Archive for the tag 'sports'

3041-ocean2

A new premier, luxury, incredible, modern, state-of-the-art condominium development is headed to 3041 Ocean Avenue, between Voorhies Avenue and Jerome Avenue.

The former site of a medical center (minus one of those, natch), fencing went up at the site a few weeks ago, and a fancy-shmancy rendering of the site has been posted.

And, all my broker-babble derision aside, it actually looks pretty nice.

The Department of Buildings approved the plan on March 17. It’ll feature nine floors in all. The top seven stories will be home to 40-units (six on six of the floors, four on the top floor).

If you’re thinking, “Oh, great, I bet there’ll be a medical office on the first two floors,” well, you’re wrong. It looks like this developer is actually paying attention to the fact that they’re in a flood zone, and the ground level floor will be used for a lobby and garage for 30 cars and 20 bicycles, with flood-proofed storage space.

The second floor will have parking for 27 cars (including dedicated handicapped spots). This is where they’ll also be putting the mechanical equipment and boilers to protect them from potential flooding.

For those keeping track, that’s 40 units and 57 parking spaces, plus parking for 20 bicycles. Zoning for this lot requires only 20 parking spaces. So, yes, someone in this neighborhood actually put more parking than is legally required! Hell hath frozen over!

Moving on, the roof will not be dormant. The plans call for an “outdoor recreation area.”

The new owner, an LLC connected to local entrepreneur Sergey Rybak (one of the partners in the $20 million MatchPoint NYC sports development on Shell Road), bought the 12,650 square-foot lot in September 2013 for $4.1 million.

It’s too soon to say how much units here might cost. A note on the sign said more information will become available in September 2014.

3041-ocean

A Sheepshead Bay resident is one of five finalists competing for a chance to join the cast of Broadway’s Rock of Ages and sing during the Super Bowl broadcast on February 2.

The cast of Rock of Ages will perform as part of Super Bowl XLVIII’s NFL Tailgate Party, part of which will be televised live on FOX Super Bowl Sunday.

To drum up excitement for the show, Rock of Ages put together an online contest, welcoming would-be musical stars to perform a cover of Bon Jovi’s “Dead or Alive.”

Arnel Arcedo, a Filipino immigrant who lives in Sheepshead Bay, is currently in the lead with 871 votes as of this writing, just a smidge over the the second place contestant, who shamelessly employed her baby to get votes. The contest goes on until 4 p.m. today, welcoming the public to vote. You can vote here.

It would be the second dream come true for Arcedo in the past few months. After relentlessly pursuing a career in illustration, he released a graphic novel late last year that he worked on for seven years while riding the subway system. He debuted the work at New York Comic Con in October, becoming the first Filipino author and illustrator to present at the event.

Give a neighbor a boost, and go vote now!

Source: newyorksportstawk.blogspot.com

Lincoln High School’s football team, the Railsplitters (an awesome name, by the way), snagged their second title in three years with a 28 to 27 win at the PSAL City Conference championship at Yankee Stadium last week.

The team bested Tottenville Pirates for the title, despite suffering its own setback: senior quarterback Javon Moore sprained his ankle during their first offensive play. He muscled through the game before heading to the hospital after the match.

“He was a warrior and battled through and made a play when he had to,” Lincoln coach Shawn O’Connor told the Daily News.

It was a tight game, in which Lincoln pulled ahead by one point with less than five minutes on the clock. We urge you to check out the Daily News article for the dramatic play by play.

Congratulations to Lincoln High School (2800 Ocean Parkway) and the Railsplitters!

Andre Civil

Andre Civil (Source: ScarletKnights.com)

Way, way back in the halycon days of May 2008, when Sheepshead Bites had just launched, the fourth story ever published on this site was about the recruitment of Sheepshead Bay High School (3000 Avenue X) football’s defensive end Andre Civil to Rutgers University‘s Scarlet Knights (also, my alma mater.)

Back then, the team was just beginning to rise after years of pitiful performance, and started making a name for itself. Fast forward three and a half years, and Rutgers University joined the Big Ten Conference, helping solidify its athletic excellence.

Civil, who took on the role of right-tackle after the NFL picked off a few of his colleagues, played a prominent role in the team’s surge in rankings, and he’s been embraced by the students and alumni, who’ve started packing the football stadium (during my years there, the school literally bribed students to go to games. On some days, it was the only place you could get a meal using the meal plan).

That spirit is a whole lot different than Civil is used to. A native of the Sheepshead Bay – Nostrand Houses, Civil notes that New York City dwellers’ indifference towards high school and college football spurred him to work harder.

The Trentonian profiled Civil, writing:

“First off, I think a lot of people don’t look at New York high school football as much,” said Civil, who mostly ran a Wing-T offense in high school. “You just kind of have a chip on your shoulder and want to show people you can play ball and compete with other states, especially New Jersey because New Jersey is known for football.”

Civil grew up right across the street from Sheepshead Bay and played football at the adjoining field. Some schools, like Flatbush’s Erasmus Hall, would have to commute through the borough just to get to practice.

He played games at noon every Saturday, like clockwork. Sheepshead Bay never played night games, despite having lights. Civil did not need them to turn on.

Check out the full profile here.

I bet Obama hates this painting, which hangs in an Indian art gallery, as much as he hates our children. (Source: ssquah.blogspot.com)

I bet Obama hates this painting, which hangs in an Indian art gallery, as much as he hates our children. (Source: ssquah.blogspot.com)

It might be the worst thing President Barack Obama has ever done.

The commander-in-chief is neglecting to make time for teenagers from Edward R. Murrow High School (1600 Avenue L), who were crowned national student chess champions, winning the title for the eighth time this April.

While Barry Obama has made time for the San Francisco Giants, the Indiana Fever, and even the 1972 Miami Dolphins, he’s got no time for pawn-pushers – even if his predecessor did meet with the team in 2004.

New York Daily News has got the scoop:

[Coach Eliot] Weiss has made numerous requests of the White House via email and post, but has been rejected each time — and each time, the White House suggests that the leader of the free world is just too busy.

“Due to the volume of inquiries and the time constraints of his schedule, the President must decline the majority of meeting requests he receives,” the White House wrote to Weiss in October. “We have reviewed your invitation, and unfortunately, President Obama will be unable to accommodate your request for a meeting.”

It’s particular distressing, Weiss said, because Murrow’s 2013 victory may have been its greatest, with the pride of Midwood besting 1,500 teams from 49 states at the tournament in Nashville, Tenn.

… As leaders themselves, Weiss’ team members know how important an Oval Office could be to their sport and their school.

“A meeting with President Obama could have a positive effect in this neighborhood and even the borough,” said Alexis Paredes, 17, a senior and star player who is originally from Moscow and ranks as an international master. “So many schools have great basketball teams or soccer teams, but not many schools can say they chess team that has won so many nationals.”

While the U.S. President isn’t saying much for himself, Brooklyn’s Borough President Marty Markowitz has a mouthful for him.

“Edward R. Murrow High School and the surrounding Midwood community are understandably proud to be home to America’s reigning ‘kings and queens’ of chess,” the borough president told the News. “Our borough has a growing tradition of excellence in ‘the royal game.’ which also includes the stars of ‘Brooklyn Castle’ in Bushwick. They are all stellar role models of mental mastery, and we here in Brooklyn celebrate their triumphs both day and ‘knight’!”

We have no idea what the president could be doing that’s more important than this.

Renaming the Redskins: Four New, Nonracist Names and Logos for D.C.’s NFL Team

Source: Washington Redskins

BETWEEN THE LINES: It’s time for the National Football League to tackle inappropriate team names, with the Washington Redskins being the most provocative.

Though most public opinion polls confirm only a small minority of Americans consider the name objectionable, the lingering matter warrants earnest deliberation from the NFL. The topic recently hurdled back into the spotlight after one high-profile opinion that recently made headlines.

President Barack Obama, apparently with more on his mind than Mideast turmoil, the debt ceiling and the government shutdown, added his two cents to the lingering issue in an interview with the Associated Press, when he said he would “think about changing” the name if he owned the Washington team.

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Source: WFAN via nydailynews.com

Source: WFAN via nydailynews.com

Russ Salzberg, more affectionately known as “The Sweater,” has been a New York City sportscasting mainstay for 25 years. A New York Daily News report reflected on Salzberg’s success and his humble Sheepshead Bay roots.

Those most familiar with the 62-year-old Salzberg know him for his work on New York Giants and Yankees post-game reports and for his local special event television sportscasting activities. Despite all his success, including a long run working the mid-morning show with legendary WFAN host Steve Summers in the 1990s, Salzberg credits all his success to his father Lou, Brooklyn and the streets of Sheepshead Bay.

“I’ve been there 25 years since…What you see is who I am. I’m just Russ Salzberg from Avenue V and this is how I see it. I owe everything, all my success, to Brooklyn,” Salzberg told the Daily News.

In touring the area, Salzberg recounted his memories of the neighborhood that shaped him:

And it all started here in “V Park,” next to 2886 Avenue V of the Sheepshead Bay projects where he was raised and learned to play the sports that became his life.

“My old man was a track worker for the Transit Authority,” he says, walking into the park. “And all my pals here were working-class. Tough, funny, street-smart, loyal, no BS.”

He stands in the asphalt softball field, gazing at this Brooklyn laboratory where he created a helluva good life. “I played softball, stickball, football, hockey here,” he says. “We shot hoops over there. We met girls there on the benches at night. I learned all there was to know about life right here.”

Sometimes he would come here alone, imagining he was a big leaguer, and do a play-by-play aloud. “‘The count is 3-and-2 with two out in the bottom of the ninth with Salzberg at the dish. And here comes the pitch…’”

Salzberg also remembered how his father helped build the Amity Little League fields located at Knapp Street and Avenue V.

“My old man built these fields. He graded the earth, planted the grass, put up the fence. It was called Bedford Bay Little League then. He’d get up at 6 a.m. on a Saturday morning, come down, cut the grass, chalk the lines, and by 8 he was coaching my team. And then because my brother was mentally handicapped, he created a league just for handicapped kids. My father was hard as nails, with a heart of pure gold,” Salzberg said.

Tragically, Lou Salzberg died at age 47, three years after the Transit Authority forced him to retire over his bad heart. Salzberg reflected how difficult his father’s loss was for him:

Voice cracking, he smooths his natty suit and shrugs. “He died at 47,” he says. “That wasn’t his worst day. That came three years earlier when the TA forced him to retire because of his bum ticker. Lou Salzberg was a very proud guy. Take away his job and it ripped out his soul. I learned my work ethic from him.”…

Any regrets?

“Just one,” he says. “That my old man never got to see me succeed. Because of all the great people I’ve met, my father was my one true hero.”

This was a great piece by the Daily News and really interesting for people obsessed with listening to WFAN like I am. Growing up in the 90s, I remember fondly listening to humorous antics of the “Sweater and the Schmoozer” on summer days before the Mike and the Mad Dog took over at 1 p.m. To check out the rest of the story, which includes Russ’s story of how he broke into broadcasting, click here.

docgoodenNew York Yankees baseball legend Dwight “Doc” Gooden will be in Sheepshead Bay this Saturday, signing photos and copies of his memoir to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Sheepshead Bay’s Ridgewood Savings Bank (2520 East 17th Street).

The feared pitcher, who played for both the Mets and the Yankees, as well as other teams, during his 16-year MLB career will dole out autographed photos for free to those who stop by the event. The youngest player to appear in an All Star Game, Gooden was known for his 98 mph pitch and curveball.

Gooden struggled over the years with alcohol and drug abuse, an experience he eventually overcame and detailed in his 2013 autobiography Doc: A Memoir. Signed copies of the book will be available at the event for $20, with all proceeds from the sale going to support the Bay Improvement Group.

The signing event will kick off at noon and last until 2:00 p.m.

Kings Bay fields, just after Sandy. (Source: Kings Bay Little League)

Kings Bay fields, just after Sandy. (Source: Kings Bay Little League)

Kings Bay Little League, one of Sheepshead Bay’s only Little League organizations, took a beating during Superstorm Sandy, when water tumbled past the Belt Parkway and submerged its below-street-level fields.

Now, they’re receiving some relief, scoring a home run of $15,200 in grant funding from the Baseball Tomorrow Fund and the New York Mets.

The grant went to restoring the fields at Coyle Street, between Voorhies Avenue and Shore Parkway, which sat under four feet of water for more than a week after the storm. Money also went to funding a new scoreboard, pitching machine, storage lockers and utility vehicle – all lost during Superstorm Sandy.

Baseball Tomorrow Fund and the New York Mets announced in May that they would donate up to $1 million to youth baseball and softball organizations impacted by Sandy, and soon after chose Kings Bay as a recipient. The new scoreboard was unveiled in August, and celebrated during a barbecue outing at the fields earlier this month.

“Thanks to the Baseball Tomorrow we were able to replace most of the items lost or damaged due to Sandy. Our facility is fully operational now and is hosting numerous little league games,” said Kings Bay leadership in a press release.

View more photos of the flooded fields after the jump.

Source: ebbandflowphotography via flickr.

Source: ebbandflowphotography via flickr.

In 2010, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his administration raised the fees for residents looking to use City-run recreational facilities, including ball fields and tennis courts, looking for a bump in revenue. According to an exhaustive report by the Independent Budget Office (IBO), the increased fees not only failed to increase revenue but drove down membership across the city.

The numbers laid out by the IBO starkly portray the failure of Bloomberg’s bet that increased membership fees would increase revenues. The City was projecting that increasing fees would lead to $6.3 million in extra revenue but in the end, they only ended up with $1.1 million in extra revenue and decreased athletic facility activity across the city. The IBO laid out the specifics:

• With considerably higher fees at the start of the 2011 tennis season, the number of adult seasonal tennis permits sold by the city fell from 12,774 in 2010 to 7,265 in 2012, a decline of 43 percent. Single-play permits fell 46 percent, from 23,512 to 12,755 over the same period.

• Despite the decline in the number of adult permits sold, there was an increase in revenue because fees doubled for these permits. The city collected a total of $2.1 million from the sale of adult, junior, and senior tennis permits in 2012, but the revenue fell $1.3 million short of the projected increase.

• The number of recreation center memberships sold in 2012 declined by 52 percent to 46,047 with the doubling of membership fees for adults and seniors at the start of the fiscal year.

• With the decline in memberships, recreation center revenue remained flat in 2012 at $4.8 million, about $4.0 million below the Bloomberg Administration’s expectations.

• Although the number of permits sold for ballfields also fell in 2012 in response to the rise in fees, the resulting increase in revenue exceeded expectations by nearly 5 percent.

The full IBO report, which you can read in detail by clicking here, presents the fascinating insight into how the fee increase, in their opinion, ultimately ran counter to Bloomberg’s much publicized health initiatives:

The parks department raised its fees for tennis permits, recreation center memberships, and the use of ballfields as part of a citywide effort to close projected budget shortfalls. While anticipating some fall-off in usage, the city still projected that the new fee schedules would raise $6.3 million in additional revenue in 2012. The decline in sales of tennis permits and recreation center memberships was far steeper than expected, however, and the gain in revenue totaled roughly $1.1 million—a fraction of what had been expected.

Perhaps equally troubling, the sharp drop-off in parks usage runs counter to the Bloomberg Administration’s anti-obesity and other health policy initiatives.

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