Archive for the tag 'snowstorms'

A great photo by Roman Kruglov of the last snow storm to hit Sheepshead Bay.

A great photo by Roman Kruglov of the last snow storm to hit the area.

Was anyone else caught off guard by today’s snow? I mean, I knew it was going to snow, but I wasn’t prepared for the wall of white we woke up to today.

Here’s the rundown of what you need to know:

Weather conditions

As of right now, it appears there’s about three inches on the ground. It’s expected to hit between 5 and 8 inches throughout the day, and then turn into snow and freezing rain at night and into morning. The heaviest snowfall is expected to come between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.

Currently, we’re under a winter storm warning until 7 p.m. tonight, when the warning eases up into a winter storm watch through the night and into morning.

The difference between a winter storm warning and a winter storm watch is that a warning means that a hazardous winter event is occurring and likely to pose a threat to life and property. A watch is less severe, and indicates that a significant weather event is expected, but not imminent.

The current warning covers all five boroughs, Nassau County and parts of New Jersey.

Road conditions

Because the snow began with a light rain mixture, and will finish off tonight with a freezing rain, streets and sidewalks will be slippery throughout the day, night and tomorrow.

Making matters worse, visibility is significantly reduced. So try to stay off the roads if you can, and if you can’t, drive slowly and with consideration for others on the road.

If you must drive, the city recommends using major roadways and highways as these will be plowed first.

Alternate side parking rules are suspended, but payment at parking meters remains in effect.

Pedestrian and public safety

Remember to shovel a path in front of your home, but avoid overexertion when shoveling, and stretch before you go out (a major cause of death in the winter is heart attacks caused by overexertion while shoveling).

Keep dry, and watch for signs of frostbite, which includes the loss of body heat and white or pale appearance in extremities.

Mass transit

As far as mass transit, the MTA is not reporting snow related delays or problems in the subway system, but says that buses are running on a delayed schedule. Customers are urged to walk, and not run on staircases or platforms and to hold on to handrails when boarding and alighting from buses.

Public schools and  garbage collection

Non-District 75 public high schools are closed for students but open for staff; all other public schools open. Field trips and after school programs have been canceled.

Useful links

Here are some links to keep track of local conditions and city service statuses.

Did we miss something you think is important? Have a question we didn’t answer? Let us know in the comments!

This was not yesterday’s snow. This was much worse.

When it snowed in the beginning of the month – the first challenge of the new de Blasio administration – we received a slew of e-mails, phone calls and social media comments claiming that the city was botching the job and streets remained unplowed.

When it snowed yesterday, we heard nary a peep from our readers.

On the surface it would seem that residents appeared more satisfied with the city’s response to yesterday’s snow than they had been to the previous winter storm. But the New York Post disagrees. On the front page of the paper today, an all-caps headline reads “SHAMBLES! Turmoil as Blas botches ‘early’ snow.” The story claims that the Sanitation Department was caught off guard because the snow fell earlier than predicted, and zeros in on “tony” Upper East Side residents who claim they were neglected because they didn’t vote for Bill de Blasio. At the core of that claim is the Sanitation Department’s plow tracker map, which showed that the neighborhood had not received timely plowing. The New York Post, being the New York Post, neglected to mention the huge swaths of the outerboroughs that showed the same thing. (The Sanitation Department claimed that it was due to a broken GPS, and the Upper East Side had indeed been plowed. That’s comforting, right?).

Here in Southern Brooklyn, major streets were plowed regularly and side streets less frequently, as is the routine. As anyone who put shovel to concrete yesterday knows, it took about five minutes for the snow to again completely blanket the sidewalk. On our little side street, we did see the plows running regularly, even if it didn’t make much of an impact, but we haven’t seen any salt spreaders which would be useful in ridding ourselves of that last two inches of impact snow on the asphalt.

So our take is this: we’ve seen worse snow, and we’ve seen worse management of the snow. It could be better – more regular plowing and some salt would be nice, as would enforcement of laws requiring homeowners and businesses clear their sidewalks.

What do you think? Where does the city’s snow management need improvement?

Hmm. I never noticed the directory in which the National Weather Service kept its weather advisories in. Think they're trying to tell us something?

Hmm. I never noticed the directory in which the National Weather Service keeps its weather advisories. Think they’re trying to tell us something?

The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Storm Watch for all five boroughs, saying that a winter storm is becoming increasingly likely to strike the area on Tuesday.

The storm watch remains in effect from Tuesday afternoon through late Tuesday night, with as much as eight inches of snow expected to blanket the city and its surroundings, including parts of Connecticut, Westchester, Long Island and New Jersey.

The agency says that snow will be accompanied by wind gusts as strong as 30 miles per hour, and temperatures will drop to the single digits at night. Snowfall is expected to begin in the early morning and continue all day and night.

To prepare for the possible snow, the city has issued a snow alert, sending the signal to the Department of Sanitation to begin preparation, including loading 365 salt spreaders, attaching plows, preparing tire chains and notifying personnel that they may have a tough day ahead of them.

Drivers and pedestrians beware: it’ll be hazardous conditions with low visibility to try and get around in, and the high winds could contribute to frost bite.

Dress warm, and drive safely. If taking mass transit, pay attention to service alerts and give yourself extra time to travel.

Be sure to keep the following links handy tomorrow to get all the most important information as the storm comes through:

skiing

Sure, it started out as a warm, wet Monday. But as the day has gone on, the thermometer’s mercury has steadily crept downward as we experience one of the steepest temperature drops in New York City history. Tonight will see a low of nine degrees, edging only slightly upward with a high of 12 degrees on Tuesday.

What better way to get you ready for that bitter chill than to show you photos of snow? We usually do a photo gallery from the first major snow day of the season, but most of these photos came in too late on Friday… and I was on vacation, enjoying someplace warmer than this. So here are some of the great photos we received last week, and if you see something that particularly captures tonight’s and tomorrow’s cold spell, snag a photo on your cell phone or other camera and send it over to nberke [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

In the meantime, stay warm and check on your neighbors!

Check out the photos.

The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for all of New York City, lasting through today and tomorrow morning, with eight inches of snow and 40 mile-per-hour wind gusts predicted.

It’s the first snowstorm of the year, and is forecast to have near-blizzard conditions and single-digit temperatures.

The snowstorm will deliver its biggest blow to New York City this evening, during the rush hour commute, when the heavier snow is expected to fall.

The Sanitation Department has already gone into snowstorm mode, loading salt spreaders at facilities across the facility.

Alternate side parking is suspended for today. Parking meters remain in effect.

Here are a few tips for weathering the storm and staying warm and safe:

  • Avoid unnecessary travel – Wet or icy roads are dangerous enough. But also avoid going out on foot or any other means. Strong winds could dislodge tree limbs or other debris, which can turn deadly.
  • Prepare for power outages – Charge all of your mobile devices and any other electronics you may need, and make sure you have fresh batteries in your radios and alarm clocks. Con Edison infrastructure is still vulnerable following Superstorm Sandy, and power lines can be knocked out.
  • We hate telling people to stock up on water, gasoline and other such supplies, but if you can, you should.
  • Check on your neighbors, especially if you live next to senior citizens or disabled people.
  • When shoveling, don’t overexert yourself, and be aware of utilities. Don’t cover up fire hydrants in mounds of snow.

The progress of snow plows can be monitored PlowNYC, set up after complaints from the 2010 blizzard.

Turn to Sheepshead Bites for the latest information from government authorities and utility companies, school, transit and road closures, as well as on-the-ground reports from readers around the neighborhood.

And remember to save our e-mail address (tips [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com), phone number (347-985-0633) and Twitter account (@sheepsheadbites) into your phone. If you see downed trees or power lines, flooding, or anything else, snap a photo with your cell phone and e-mail, text or Tweet it over.

Oh, and send all your pretty snow photos over to photos [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

I am literally – literally – foaming at the mouth of the thought of spring. I’m so eager for the warm weather that when I first stepped outside this morning, into the 50+ degree weather, I said “hot diggity ” and stripped down to my boxers, mixed up some mojitos and sat in a lawn chair in front of my house.

Then I realized there were no babushkas around me, the younger gals weren’t yet in their, uh, more amenable attire, and the sound of school kids at Homecrest Park weren’t echoing through the side streets. I must have jumped the gun on spring.

And how could I forget that just three days ago – three! – it was a white winter, with a heavy, wet snow blanketing the neighborhood (if only for a moment). Luckily, some of our friendly neighborhood photographers sent over what they got from Friday’s snowfall to remind me just how darn far away warm weather really is. There’s also one from the Church Avenue Q line station that was just nifty.

Thanks guys: Robert Fernandez, Roman Kruglov and Ella Rabinovich.

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Nemopocolypse came and went, and while it was historic snowfall for other areas, Sheepshead Bay saw just nine inches of snow – making it a fairly routine blizzard.

Department of Sanitation did a fantastic job clearing the roadways quickly, and transit workers and management kept the system on track with little incident.

Responsible neighbors woke up Saturday morning, donned warm clothing, shoveled their properties, and dug out their cars. For the most part, it was a perfect snow; a blanket of white followed by warm temperatures and clear skies that made cleanup a breeze.

After taking care of my own property, I struck out Saturday morning to capture the neighborhood engulfed in white powder – and so did many of our readers. Below is a photo gallery of my photos, as well as those of the following contributors: Karen Hill, Cookie Ann, Sasha, Kathleen Higgins, Randy Contello, Katerina and Lelde, Brian Hoo, Melissa K., Igor G., Iris and Jake Rubinsky. Thank you for all of your submissions!

View the photo gallery.

Soruce: weather.com

There was a time when I enjoyed snow and snowy days. There used to be a thrill in getting off from school, or work, and then adventuring out into the fluffy white stuff and frolicking around.

Those days are gone for me. I hate the winter and its frozen air, shutting us in our homes and whipping our faces with cold when we try and walk around outside. Sadly, it looks like we are about to get a big dose of winter this weekend, as Nemo blows into town.

According to the Weather Channel, Nemo could be a storm of historic proportions. I think I speak for about eight million people when I say this city has had its fill of historic storms recently and the promise of a new one does nothing but fill me gloom.

On the bright side, barring a miscalculation from the weather experts, Nemo will hit hardest in New England, burying Connecticut, Massachusetts and Maine with two to three feet of snow while New York will only be dealing with about a half a foot of snow; annoying, but manageable.

So, just in case we get a taste of what is expected to be dumped on New England, it might be a good time to stock on groceries, reassess any serious weekend traveling and prepare for potential power outages caused by high speed damaging winds.

Best of luck and stay safe.

Doggie photo taken this weekend, submitted by Yelena K.

The weekend came and went and we finally saw the first semi-serious snowfall of the season, with approximately four inches blanketing Sheepshead Bay.

It looked pretty, and was just the right texture that made shoveling a breeze. As for the government, they stayed ahead of the curve, canceling planned track work on the subways, suspending alternate side of the street parking, and kept their new Severe Weather website relatively up-to-date.

And now, two days later, warm weather and light rains are clearing out what was left behind.

Not too shabby. We only wish more snowfalls and responses unfurled like this.

But that’s not to say things were perfect everywhere. Some blocks were not plowed as quickly as residents would like, and some homeowners and small businesses preferred to slack on shoveling rather than to do their duty as neighbors. Also, it was cold. Who the hell likes the cold? Not I, not I…

So, we’re acknowledging the good stuff. Tell us about the bad… or, you know, about anything else, since it’s an open thread and all.

 

From Notify NYC:

Notification issued 01/20/12 at 4:10 PM. Due to impending snow, The New York City Department of Transportation has suspended Alternate Side Parking Regulations Citywide for Saturday, 01/21/12. Parking meters and all other posted parking restrictions will remain in effect. For more information visit: http://www.nyc.gov/html/oem/html/home/home.shtml

Also, most planned subway service disruptions have been cancelled for the weekend, including disruptions on the Q line. Brooklyn service should be operating as usual.

The Office of Emergency Management also issued the following alert:

The NYC Office of Emergency Management (OEM) has issued a Hazardous Travel Advisory for late Friday night through Saturday night as three to five inches of snow is expected in the city Saturday morning.

OEM strongly recommends those traveling use mass transit and avoid unnecessary driving during and immediately after the storm.

Visit the City’s Severe Weather Website or call 311 for information about the City’s response to the storm.

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