Archive for the tag 'sheepshead bay rd'

The approximately footprint of the combined properties now owned by Muss Development. (Source: Google Maps)

The development site, with Voorhies Avenue to the south and Sheepshead Bay Road to the north.

The developers behind the 30-story residential tower slated for 1501 Voorhies Avenue are envisioning a luxurious haven for the area’s wealthiest residents, housed behind a gated entrance on Sheepshead Bay Road and with units starting at $700,000, Sheepshead Bites has learned.

Muss Development and AvalonBay, the development team behind the planned 280,000-square-foot, 333-foot tall proposal, briefed community stakeholders at an off-the-record, behind-closed-doors meeting a week before Sheepshead Bites shed light on the plans. Several people at the meeting shared details with this publication on the condition of anonymity, since the meeting was considered a courtesy and not required by the developer.

What emerged from their description is the first glimpse of a luxurious project that will change the physical and, potentially, the socio-economic landscape of the Sheepshead Bay Road area.

The most immediate effect of the plans is an impending demolition of a storefront on Sheepshead Bay Road at East 16th Street. Where the prior developers sought to create a street that runs through to Voorhies Avenue, Muss and AvalonBay will create a pedestrian walkway. Attendees at the meeting said renderings shared with the group showed that the walkway was a gated private entrance to the complex’s grounds.

Behind the gates was a roundabout that caps off a long driveway from Voorhies Avenue, where vehicles will enter. The 52 outdoor parking spots will be to the east, the building, with its 124 garage spots, will be on the west, abutting the subway station. It’s unclear if the Voorhies Avenue driveway will be gated or have a security booth like Muss’ Oceana Development.

The building itself will soar 333 feet into the sky at its highest point, but a portion of the building – possibly the garage – will only be a few stories tall, capped off with an outdoor common space that could have a pool and be connected to a gym and health spa. They’re considering alternative amenities for the outdoor space as well, including a dog run. The building will be pet-friendly.

Three other developments by the same architect, Perkins Eastman, for the same developer, Avalon Bay (Source: Perkins Eastman) (Click to enlarge)

Three other developments by the same architect, Perkins Eastman, for the same developer, Avalon Bay (Source: Perkins Eastman) (Click to enlarge)

The price is not for the weak of wallet. Our sources said that units are designed to be comparable to the Oceana Development, and will begin at $700,000 for a one-bedroom. One attendee told Sheepshead Bites that prices are based on a $700 per square foot rate, though this couldn’t be confirmed by others in attendance (most of the details shared here were corroborated by multiple sources). None of our sources could provide the proposed price for the building’s most expensive units, but at the Oceana they were marketed for approximately $2.1 million when the building first opened.

All of our sources say that the building will be split between rentals and owned condos, with Muss selling the condos and AvalonBay managing the rental properties. One of the sources said the bottom two-thirds of the building will be rental, while the top third will be owned condos. No proposed rates were given for the rentals.

Rental tenants and condo owners would enter using the same entrance and use the same parking lot. However, of three elevators, two will be for both renters and owners, and one will be owners only.

Each attendee that we spoke to emphasized that the developer stated that the plans are far from set in stone and are only drafts; they’re subject to change.

Our sources told us that little opposition to the plan was raised by those in attendance, which included representatives for local elected officials and members of Community Board 15. Instead, they questioned specifics of the development that could be problematic.

Multiple attendees asked about affordable housing units, and were told “absolutely not.”

Parking was also a key issue raised by the stakeholders, with some saying 176 parking spaces for 250 units plus office spaces, although the minimum required by zoning, was far from sufficient for the neighborhood.

The developer responded saying that the building’s proximity to the subway station would make it unlikely tenants would have cars. One source told us that the developer said they believed much of the parking lot would sit empty most of the time.

This was described alternately by almost all of our sources as “bullshit” and “horseshit.”

Parking wasn’t the only vehicle-related issue raised. Voorhies Avenue is often at a standstill during the day, especially at that location where vehicles stop to pick up or drop off commuters at the train station, and a constant flow of cars depart the Belt Parkway at the exit ramp directly across from their proposed driveway.

The developer told attendees they’re working with the Department of Transportation to figure out the best road configuration to accommodate vehicles entering and exiting the property’s driveway. A Stop Sign on the property is being considered.

Sound and vibrations from the subway, just feet away from the property, was also discussed. The developers told attendees that the building would have special windows to block out the sound.

Among other concerns that came up was the additional stress that the highrise would place on sewage infrastructure, already criticized by some as deficient to handle the number of homes and businesses in the area. The developer said they’re conducting an environmental impact study. One source said the developer completed the study and found that there would be no problems to the infrastructure, but this was contradicted by another source. Other sources could not recall.

The building’s plans are still being reviewed by the Department of Building, and one source said they expect it that it will be put to a more vigorous process than most – although it will likely pass. The building is as-of-right and completely within zoning, so it will not need approval from the Community Board.

The developer told attendees they expect to begin construction by spring 2015 if all goes smoothly.

Demolition of the Sheepshead Bay Road storefront will happen within the coming days.

The approximately footprint of the combined properties now owned by Muss Development. (Source: Google Maps)

When developers proposed a 22-story development at 1501 Voorhies Avenue, the community balked at the sheer scale of the project. After sitting silent for five years and a change in ownership, new plans have been filed for a whopping 30-story residential development.

Muss Development and AvalonBay submitted the plans to the Department of Buildings yesterday outlining a 333-foot tall building, with 266,244 square feet of residential space spread across 250 units. At 30 stories, it will be approximately four times taller than anything else in the area except the St. Mark Church belltower.

The building will have a lounge, playroom, bike storage, and outdoor recreation space, according to plans filed with the agency. There will be 14,530 square feet of office space and parking for 124 vehicles inside a split-level garage, and another 52 spaces available outside.

The building’s basement level will be used for storage in addition to parking, with mechanicals and utilities elevated to the first floor to protect against flooding. The lot was overwhelmed with water during Superstorm Sandy.

The plans are being designed by the architecture firm Perkins Eastman, a top-tier outfit that has done a number of ultra-modern luxury apartment developments in New York City and elsewhere. They previously teamed up with AvalonBay to build Avalon White Plains and Avalon Riverview North in Queens.

Avalon White Plains (Source: Eastman)

Another development by the same architect and developing company, Avalon White Plains (Source: Perkins Eastman)

And if Muss Development sounds familiar, it should. Muss made a name for itself in outerborough residential development when it built Brighton Beach’s Oceana Condominium complex. It appears they’re trying to replicate that success with luxury market-rate apartments in Sheepshead Bay.

As we previously reported, Muss and AvalonBay snatched up the 110,028-square-foot lot in July for $20.2 million. Originally it appeared the lot was split in two, with the former Verizon parking lot taking up 87,500 square feet and a commercial strip along Sheepshead Bay Road at East 16th Street comprising the rest. The latest plans appear to indicate that the development will encompass both sites, but it’s still unclear.

The land was sold by Acadia Realty Trust, which purchased them for $20.3 million in 2008. Acadia, in partnership with PA Associates had planned a two-building complex dubbed Station Plaza that included a 22-story mixed-use tower. There was to be mall with four floors of shopping, a new public street that cut through the property at East 16th Street, and more than 650 parking spaces – anchored by 16 floors of residential condominiums.

The plans are currently under review to see if they exceed zoning. We’ll keep you posted.

Addition (September 25): The development was also covered by Yes In My Backyard (YIMBY).

summerstroll-19

Whereas the first Sheepshead Summer Stroll ushered in the summer in June, this second one, held this past Sunday, capped off the season.

Hosted by Empower Sheepshead and the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, and sponsored by Sheepshead Bites, Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, and the Kings Bay Y, the Sheepshead Summer Stroll closes down Sheepshead Bay Road to traffic and allows businesses to turn their storefronts inside-out for shopping, dining and entertaining – and a bunch of family friendly activities.

Take our photo tour of the Summer Stroll.

bagels

Bagels Road, the new name for Bagels R Us, is now open at 1424 Sheepshead Bay Road, next to the subway station.

Bagels R Us shuttered back in July after then-owner Edwin Grichanik sold it to an employee from Delmar Pizzeria. Though we were told at the time that they would reopen in a few days, nearly two months went by as it underwent a few interior renovations (now more seating!).

For the most part, the staff remains the same, as does the bagel selection. The are sporting a new menu, heavily focused on deli sandwiches and signature items like “Dory’s Catch” – cured salmon filet with scallion cream cheese, sliced cucumbers and tomator – or the “Emily Waits” – grilled honey maple turkey with melted muenster cheese, spinach, tomato and apple butter sauce… though we can’t help notice that these are items pulled straight from Toasties’ signature line.

Regardless, best of luck to the new owners, and we hope they can avoid any, you know, issues.

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, a member of the Assembly's Health Committee, greets participants during his annual health fair. Source: Cymbrowitz's Office

Source: Cymbrowitz’s Office

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz is hosting a free Cholesterol, Glucose, and Blood Pressure Screening at his district office, 1800 Sheepshead Bay Road between Emmons Avenue and Shore Parkway, this Friday, September 5 from 10:00am to 1:00pm

Appointments are required.

Cymbrowitz, a member of the Assembly’s Health Committee, is co-sponsoring the event with Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn Medical Center.

For more information, or to make an appointment, call Cymbrowitz’ office at (718) 743-4078.

sheepsheadstroll-33

A contestant at the June competition.

Get ready! Get set! Get gluttonous!

Sheepshead Bay’s staple deli, Jimmy’s Famous Heros (1786 Sheepshead Bay Road), is looking for competitors for a sandwich eating contest to take place this Sunday at the Sheepshead Summer Stroll.

Owner Victor Spadaro said he was looking to crown a new chow champ after a four-way tie broke out earlier this year during the first Summer Stroll.

And there will be cash prizes. The person who crams the most sandwiches into his or her ravenous maw in just a few short minutes will win $100 cash. Second place will take home $50, while third place will get $25.

There are 20 seats to fill at the contest this weekend, and it’s open to men and women aged 21 and up. There is no entry fee and water and sandwiches will be provided by Jimmy’s.

The competition was one of the banner events at the first Sheepshead Summer Stroll in June, and it’s looking to be even larger this time around with a dedicated stage. The Stroll will see Sheepshead Bay Road packed with games, giveaways, live entertainment and food from local restaurants on Sunday, September 7, from noon to 5 p.m. The event takes place from Emmons Avenue to East 15th Street, turning the entire walk from the subway to the water into an action-packed pedestrian mall.

To register as a contestant in Sunday’s eating competition, call the store during business hours at (718) 648-8001. The registration deadline is Friday, September 5.

Polina Groman and her husband Elliot. Source: SpinGreen via Forbes.

Polina Groman and her husband Elliot. Source: SpinGreen via Forbes.

While the city is in the middle of grappling with the explosion of for-profit, often shady, clothing donation bin companies, one Sheepshead Bay-based company is getting recognition for doing it right.

SpinGreen, based at 1733 Sheepshead Bay Road, was profiled by Forbes magazine yesterday for their work in the space, challenging the growing notion that the bins are nothing but a nuisance.

SpinGreen manufactures, distributes, and maintains bins for both indoor and outdoor use that are rust, graffiti, and bedbug proof. While it is illegal to place these containers on public land, [owner Polina] Groman, 34 and originally from Ukraine, works with private property owners. For example, Trump Village, a complex in Brooklyn with about 3,500 residents, hosts a bin.

… The partnership requires little work for property owners since the bins have a weight sensor technology and GPS tracking that ensures the containers never overfill, and SpinGreen also has a 24/7 customer service line in case of emergency. Each owner is also provided with $2 million liability insurance.

Groman and SpinGreen are constantly battling the negative perception clothing bins are gaining. Community leaders and neighbors have been blasting the bins for adding squalor to the streets, and for their illegal placement on public property. Some of the operators also appear to imply the “donations” are going to a charitable cause, when in reality they’re being sold overseas.

The controversy has led one City Council member to introduce a bill that would get the bins tossed from public lands and the operators fined, while having legal bin operators register with the city and provide data on collections. That bill has overwhelming support and is likely to pass following hearings next month.

SpinGreen is combating this by working with reputable charities, donating all wearable items (about 10 percent of its haul) to partners instead of selling it overseas. The remains are sold to recyclers who process it for reuse in materials like industrial wiping rags or furniture padding. A portion of the proceeds of those sales go back to the property owners who host the bins, and a portion goes to charity, the owner told Forbes.

For Groman, the biggest challenge she faces isn’t the unscrupulous competition, it’s simply getting people to understand the positive impact of recycling. More than 13 million tons of textiles goes to U.S. landfills every year, with Americans recycling only about eight percent. Groman hopes to change that.

 Groman was inspired to launch an educational component to her business — an effort that would contribute to establishing a good social enterprise reputation and also increase her customer base. She said she sees education and awareness, not competition, as her biggest challenge. “Not everybody recycles cans. That’s the reality. But you know that blue bin is for recycling,” Groman said. She created a nonprofit called the Barefoot Foundation that provides free after-school programs on recycling for local schools and foundations.

Source: Cymbrowitz' Office

Source: Cymbrowitz’ Office

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz is hosting a free document shredding day for the entire community, this Wednesday, August 27 between 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.

Look for the Shred-Up truck in El Greco’s parking lot, 1821 Emmons Avenue, right off of Sheepshead Bay Road.

  • Safely destroy unwanted records, bills and documents
  • Prevent identity theft
  • Securely de-clutter your home

If you need additional information, contact the Assemblyman’s office at (718) 743-4078 or email cymbros@assembly.state.ny.us.

Assemblyman Cymbrowitz, a member of the Assembly’s Health Committee, greets participants during his annual Health Fair. Source: Cymbrowitz’ Office

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz is teaming up with Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn Medical Center to host a “Nutrition Talk,” Wednesday, August 20 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Cymbrowitz’ District Office, 1800 Sheepshead Bay Road.

Learn to eat a well-balanced diet, how to accurately read food labels and see what foods offer the best source of much-needed vitamins.

Reservations are required. To reserve your place, call (718) 743-4078 or email cymbros@assembly.state.ny.us.

Photo by Robert Fernandez

Photo by Robert Fernandez

A new hair salon for men is slated to open at 1629 Jerome Avenue, just off of Sheepshead Bay Road.

Signs for Bosphorus Hair Salon for Men went up at the storefront over the weekend, according to our super tipster Robert Fernandez. It replaces Merin Corsetiere, the long-lived women’s apparel business that went out of business earlier this year.

For those interested in history and geography, Bosphorus is the name of the strait that connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara. It forms part of the boundary that splits Europe and Asia, and it cuts through Istanbul, Turkey.

According to Greek mythology, the strait’s name means “ox passage,” in honor of nymph priestess Io, who had to cross the water to be restored to her human form after Zeus made her a cow because he wanted to get all up in that and that makes sense. She then had some of Zeus’ babies, who had some more babies, and then they had some babies and so on and so forth until one of those babies’ babies had children with great-great-whatever-granddad Zeus and Kevin Sorbo was born. He then suckled too hard on his dad’s-actual-wife-but-not-his-real-mother’s teet, causing her to jump away and fire off some boob booze into space, thereby creating the Milky Way.

Can you believe they teach this stuff in elementary school?

Anyway, hey, new hair salon!

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