Archive for the tag 'sheepshead bay plumb beach civic association'

The following is from the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association:

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The following meeting announcement has been sent to us from the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association:

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The following meeting announcement has been sent to us from the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association:

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The following meeting announcement was sent to us by the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association:

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With the motto, “No Neighbor Left Behind,” the Bay Improvement Group, along with Sheepshead Bay Plumb Beach Civic Association, Occupy Sandy and volunteers, has called another 7 p.m. Block Captains meeting for this Wednesday, December 5, at Roll ‘n’ Roaster (2901 Emmons Avenue).

The purpose of the meeting is to bring the “needs of Sheepshead Bay residents affected by Hurricane Sandy to the attention of public and private sources of support, and accelerate the pace of relief and recovery.”

They write on their announcement, “Please come if you would like to represent your block, relay the needs of your neighbors, and bring info back to them.”

Those who cannot attend but wish to make their situations known are asked to complete a survey that assesses the status of homes and any immediate needs for demolition, trash removal and any other services. The form can be found here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CKXSTLG.

 

As we reported last week, the Army Corp of Engineers began the process of restoring Plumb Beach by pumping more than 127,000 cubic yards of sand into the eroded stretch.

The video above shows you exactly what you’d expect sand pumping to look like, with a motorized plume of sand exploding onto the coastline in a near continuous stream. The sand itself is coming from Ambrose Channel, one of the city’s navigational waterways that serves commercial vessels coming and going from New York Harbor.

The process of pumping sand onto the beach is part of effort’s first phase, which should be completed in November.

The restoration of Plumb Beach, which was nearly destroyed by Hurricane Ida in 2009, is expected to be completed in 2013 at a cost of $6.5 million dollars.

The parking lot is temporarily closed to visitors.

Plumb Beach Bike Path Destroyed By Hurricane Ida

The Plumb Beach bike path after Hurricane Ida swept through in 2009.

The Army Corps of Engineers will begin hotly-anticipated long-term repairs to Plumb Beach today, dumping the first of 127,000 cubic yards of sand on an eroded stretch of the coastline.

The first phase of the project will see sand pumped onto Plumb Beach, brought here from Ambrose Channel – a navigational waterway that serves many of the commercial vessels entering and exiting New York Harbor. The Staten Island-based Great Lakes Dredge and Dock won the $3.5 million contract, and they will also place temporary geotube groins to prevent against any further erosion during the construction.

“Plumb Beach is being saved. The Belt Parkway is being saved. It is a good day for our community,” said Councilman Fidler.

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Meeting announcement from the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association:

 

While the New York City Department of Transportation reconsiders the community’s request for increased traffic safety measures at the intersection of Emmons Avenue and Bedford Avenue for the umpteenth time, yet another accident occurred over the weekend.

Reader and Sheepshead Bay / Plumb Beach Civic Association member Tom Paolillo sent us the photos and the following:

Sunday morning, September 9th 2012….awakened by BANG..the sound of crunching metal and screeching skidding tires….this time the occupants of the small Toyota were injured when they were hit broadside by the van…The Toyota obviously could not see the approaching van while attempting to turn left onto to Bedford Ave.

A picture is worth a thousand words…

Indeed.

The Sheepshead Bay / Plumb Beach Civic Association has been demanding safety improvements to the intersection for several years. Most recently, they renewed their calls at their meeting last week, saying the site needs a left turn signal on the eastbound side of Emmons Avenue, and daylighting – a setback of parking to improve visibility – on the median.

Community Board 15 Chairperson Theresa Scavo put a new request in to DOT last week, but the agency has denied similar requests for the location multiple times before.

The scene of an April 2011 accident on Bedford Avenue and Emmons Avenue.

Community Board 15 sent a request to the Department of Transportation yesterday, seeking a left turn signal and daylighting at the accident-prone intersection of Emmons Avenue and Bedford Avenue.

The corner, as we reported yesterday, is the site of frequent collisions, according to residents. Cars making a left from eastbound Emmons Avenue onto Bedford Avenue are forced to make a blind turn, as parked cars along the median block the view. We’ve reported on several accidents at the intersection.

The request went in after yet another accident this weekend, spurring members of the Sheepshead Bay / Plumb Beach Civic Association to renew their calls for the turn signal and daylighting, a safety measure that sets parking back several feet in order to increase visibility for oncoming traffic.

But Community Board 15 Chairperson Theresa Scavo said that residents shouldn’t hold their breaths for DOT action.

“How many times have we requested this? This is not the first time we’ve requested this,” Scavo said. “Every now and then we get a call, ‘We need a left turn signal there.’ Fine. But we put in this request several times and it’s always been rejected.”

Scavo added that it can take up to four months for the agency to make their determination. DOT inspectors visit the site and count the number of vehicles making the left turn, as well as look at the intersection’s accident history, and take action dependent on internal criteria.

That leaves residents with little recourse for action, except repeating their request every few months.

“There’s nothing that [neighbors] can do. DOT goes there and does the study. If there is not a certain percentage of cars making that left, they wont do it,” Scavo said. “It doesn’t matter how many people they get letters from, it’s a DOT study and they have criteria and if it’s not there it’s not there.”

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