Archive for the tag 'schools'

The following is a paid announcement from the MBBC/Nash Jew After School Program (330 Neptune Avenue, 3rd Floor):

after-school

MBBC/Nash Jew After School program, located at 330 Neptune Avenue, offers hands-on homework and tutoring help from certified NY teachers and assistants, as well as a slew of excellent programming to grow their world beyond the classroom. With specializations in dance, gymnastics, art, karate and more, we help children become well-rounded individuals.

Our facility also offers music and drama theater, alongside social activities like table tennis and chess. Hot, nutritious lunches are provided to every kid, including soups, fruits, vegetables and juices. We also provide transportation from schools and to homes, a big convenience for working parents.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s what one parent had to say about their experience:

MBBC/Nash Jew After School is great in all aspects. My daughter has been attending MBBC’s afterschool program for three years. Besides completing all of her homework in the program, she enjoys personalized attention from teachers and counselors. Every person working in the program greets us with a smile and positive attitude. Every day, they provide kids with different activities: gymnastics, dancing, chess, arts, and after, she can stay for additional training in a program she enjoys most. For my daughter, it’s dancing and gymnastics. All instruction is available in both English and Russian, which allows my daughter to learn Russian language and use it more. Any time I had a problem picking my daughter up, transportation was available. If she felt sick, I was called immediately. I will definitely use MBBC for years to come and recommend it to everyone.

– Natalie Chernikova – mother of Nastya Berard, student

Our programs are designed for students in pre-kindergarten to middle school, and is certified by the New York State Department of Family and Children Services.

Call (718) 891-1111 or visit our website to sign up now!

The above is a paid announcement by MBBC/Nash Jew Afterschool Program. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

Source: Weinstein's office

Source: Weinstein’s office

The following is an unaltered press release from the offices of Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein:

Thanks to Assemblywoman Weinstein, Students at P.S. 52 learning about the Holocaust and World War II during the month of May, heard personal stories of survival from local Holocaust survivors.

Contrasted with school Holocaust curriculums, the program brought members of New York Association of Holocaust Survivors to present first-person and intimate portraits of the adversities they had to overcome in order to survive. Students had plenty of questions for their guests – most, decorated Russian War Veterans – and were shocked to learn that the survivors had been close to their age when they suffered the described hardships and losses.

“There is little doubt that we are getting dangerously close to a time when we will be unable to hear these stories from the individuals who experienced them,” said Assemblywoman Weinstein. “These students need to hear these heartbreaking accounts of survival in the face of baseless hatred and violence so we can make good on our promise to ‘Never Forget’. I will continue to work with the NYS Association of Holocaust Survivors to bring this crucial program to other area schools.”

Cortez (Source: NYPD)

Cortez (Source: NYPD)

The Friday disappearance of an autistic 14-year-old student kicked off a weekend search throughout Sheepshead Bay and Manhattan Beach, ending this morning when the boy was safely reunited with his family.

Ninth-grader Elicio Cortez went missing after he wrapped up the school day at Leon M. Goldstein High School (1830 Shore Boulevard). Cops tracked his last-known whereabouts down to Voorhies Avenue, near the Sheepshead Bay subway station, where he was caught on surveillance camera.

Cortez was known to spend time in the Coney Island area, and authorities, friends and family fanned out throughout Sheepshead Bay, Manhattan Beach, Brighton Beach and Coney Island, passing out fliers over the weekend as they hoped for his safe return.

They were seen at Bayfest on Sunday, and fliers now hang on nearly every light-pole and bus station in the neighborhood.

Cortez usually takes a yellow school bus home after classes, not mass transportation, which his mother, Nancy Reavis, said he’s unfamiliar with.

The school’s bus driver was the first to tip Reavis off to his disappearance, PIX11 reports:

When his bus driver didn’t see him, she called his mom.

“She tells me, ‘Eliceo is not on the bus.’ She said, ‘[T]hey called him on the loudspeaker at school,’” the frantic mother recalled.

Reavis said she also received a call from the school’s principal who confirmed that her son was not in the school.

The Department of Education said they were assisting with the search.

“School officials are in contact with his mother and we are all deeply concerned about his well-being. Since this situation was identified on Friday we have worked and continue to work closely with NYPD in its investigation,” department officials said in a statement.

Ultimately, Cortez was found at 7 a.m. this morning near Oriental Boulevard in Manhattan Beach, according to the Associated Press. He was unharmed and reunited with his family in Flatbush. It is not yet clear where he spent the weekend.

Reavis told reporters over the weekend that she feared this was a situation bound to happen. She has been urging the school to provide a bus helper to ensure Cortez gets on the school bus after classes, a request the administration has resisted.

CBS reports:

Reavis said that her son went to the train station after leaving Leon Goldstein high. She is angry and said that she has fought with school officials about getting her son a ‘para’ or bus helper to make sure that he makes it home safely.

“I spoke to his counselor and they said ‘yes, we’re gonna do something, we’re gonna do something,’” she said, “This is what has to happen so they can help me?”

cih-student-art

Associate Executive Director Robert Cooper speaks with one of the student artists.

Fifth-grade students from Manhattan Beach’s P.S. 95 (131 Irwin Street) today donated a dozen framed watercolor works they painted to Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway), and they will soon hang in patient areas to help lift patients’ spirits.

The works were produced by the students in Mr. William Lawson’s art class as part of a project called “The Art of Giving,” an annual program coordinated by the United Federation of Teachers to connect elementary school art classes with local hospitals.

cih-student-art3

Student artists pose for a photo with Cooper and teacher William Lawson.

The Art of Giving, now in its fifth year, was inspired by the late Sharon Coates, a teacher at P.S. 156.While Coates was hospitalized, she was presented with student art.

“Seeing the children’s artwork on the walls lifted my spirits,” Coates later said, according to UFT Vice President for Elementary Schools Karen Alford, who was Coates’ union representative at the time. Alford later launched the program and continues to oversee it.

cih-student-art2

A hospital staffer heaps praise on one of the student artists.

While at the hospital for the unveiling ceremony today, the students were treated to cookies and juice – as well as showered with gratitude from hospital staff including Associate Executive Director Robert Cooper and Chief Nurse Terry Mancher.

Mancher in particular was rigorously interrogated by the students, some of whom said they’d like to be doctors or nurses. She told them of the tremendously rewarding experiences she’s had, explained the difference between medical school and nursing school and clarified that, no, doctors are not bosses to the nurses.

She also talked about the vital role Coney Island Hospital nurses played during Superstorm Sandy, when much of the staff stayed on-site even as power in the facility failed, and how they assisted in the evacuation after the storm.

P.S. 255 (Source: Google Maps)

P.S. 255 (Source: Google Maps)

A report of a suspicious device or package on the third floor of P.S. 255 (1866 East 17th Street) spurred police and school administrators to take extra precautions yesterday, evacuating their building and that of Cunningham Junior High School next door.

The evacuation took place at approximately 10:45 a.m., as a large presence from the NYPD arrived on scene – including bomb squad units.

Tipster Mike G. wrote to Sheepshead Bites that kids were taken several blocks away. Adding to the chaos, the school had brought in additional teachers for the day. He writes:

all kids outside three blocks away. Today they brought in teachers from other zones/districts to check tests. As soon as they walked in this morning, the alarm went off and a ton of cops showed up.

Police searched the school but did not find any suspicious device, reports News12.

Students were back in their classrooms by noon.

UPDATE (1:50 p.m.): A parent of a student at P.S. 255 sent us a copy of the note sent home with kids yesterday:

parentnote

Click to enlarge

Source: Mooshme/Flickr

The producers of the hit-U.K. television show Supernanny are coming to Sheepshead Bay on Monday in search of the smartest kids in America with a casting event at the Brooklyn Amity School (3867 Shore Parkway)

Shed Media US is gearing up for eight-part documentary series exploring the world of highly gifted and profoundly intelligent children and their families as they power through a rigorous academic competition developed by American MENSA.  The show will feature kids with high IQs and extraordinary interests and abilities, while parents discuss how their kids’ hunger for knowledge affects their lives and share parenting tips.

The competition, to be broadcast on an undisclosed major national cable network, will take place over five weeks during summer vacation, and the winner will receive academic acclaim and an education-oriented prize.

The Monday casting event will feature quizzes and questionnaires to determine their readiness. The producers are looking for students aged 8 to 12 and their families. The search is open to any students living in the New York region.

If you’re interested in participating, contact Tessa.gogol@gmail.com or call (310) 801-6090. Walk-ins are welcome at the Monday casting call.

Location of greatness: Kingsborough’s radio station, WKRB. (Source: WKRB)

Kingsborough Community College’s radio station, WKRB, received the honor of being named the best community college radio station in the nation. The announcement was made during the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System‘s 74th annual news conference in New York City.

In 2012, the radio station completed major renovations to their recording studio. The team has been putting it to good use since then, as this award shows. The station, which claims to be “Brooklyn’s Only Dance Music Studio,” holds a series of different music hours like “Alternative Avenue” and “The Metal Meltdown.” The Intercollegiate Broadcasting System is a not-for-profit education corporation founded in 1940.

They also feature student disc jockeys. One of these DJs, who is also the program director and senior college lab technician, Elissa Nieves, received the award for “Best Specialty Show” for her program Freestyle Fridays. And students Malcolm Smith and Kenya Fredericks, who host a show called The Bizzy Mizz Diversion, were finalists for “Best Talk Program” and “Most Creative Program.”

“This is not only an honor for all of the hard work that our students do throughout the year at WKRB, but a reflection of the support and dedication of the faculty and administration of KCC. It’s what makes this campus one of the best in the nation,”  WKRB General Manager Rob Herklotz said in a press release

WKRB is completely student-operated, FCC-licensed radio station. The station can be heard in Brooklyn on 90.3FM or on their website.

Congrats to the station for the recognition!

weinstein

The following is a press release from the offices of Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein:

Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein has been visiting schools to publicize the expansion of the Universal Pre-Kindergarten (UPK) program and the April 23rd enrollment deadline.

The Assemblywoman fought strongly for the expansion, with $300 million in the recently enacted 2014-15 State Budget potentially allowing for all NYC children turning 4 in 2014 with free Pre-K education if enrolled in time. Half day and full day programs will be available at Public schools and Community based organizations.

The Assemblywoman read to students enrolled in the UPK program at PS 197. The administration and teachers at the school voiced excitement about the expansion.

“Studies are showing how vital Pre-K education is for the healthy growth of a child as they head on to Kindergarten and primary school,” said PS 197 Principal Rosemarie Nicoletti. “The expansion of this program will help us reach so many more children and I thank Assemblywoman Weinstein for her continued commitment to serving the needs of her youngest constituents.”

“As successful as we were in Albany in securing this funding, the real success of this program will depend on how many children enroll,” said the Assemblywoman. “I urge parents of eligible children to apply before we hit the deadline on April 23rd.”

Parents can enroll online or by calling or visiting the Brooklyn enrollment center at 131 Livingston Street (718-935-4908). The office will be open from 8 am – 7 pm on the following dates: April 8 – 9, April 15 – 16, and April 22 – 23.

School Science Poster copy

Students from I.S. 98 – also known as the Bay Academy of the Arts and Sciences – found themselves engaged with a maze of science-related activities and exploration on March 27.

The event has been held in the school for the past five years, turning the school into a Brooklyn-style science playground that invites children to not just learn about things in a school textbook but to also make these things interesting.

“It’s a really cool event,” Irena Johnson, a science teacher at the school, said. “Everything is completely free for the families and the kids. It’s for the science enthusiast in everyone.” Johnson was overlooking a stand where her students were helping children pot soil and plants.

Presenters at the event ranged from the eggheads at the Noble Maritime Museum and the Department of Environmental Conservation, to forensic detectives from the FBI and NYPD, as well as those showing the natural wonders in National Parks to the unnatural weirdness with Ripley’s Believe It or Not.

Check out this video we put together at the event:

Teacher Alini Brito (r.) was found naked from the waist up with co-worker Cindy Mauro (l.) by a janitor in a James Madison High School classroom in 2009.

Cindy Mauro (left) and Alini Brito (right)

More than three years after being fired for an after-hours sexual tryst in a classroom, a judge has ordered the Department of Education to rehire the two Madison High School teachers who got dirty in the dark.

Cindy Mauro and Alini Brito were fired in December 2010, more than a year after reports surfaced that the two foreign language teachers were caught by a janitor “undressed” in an empty classroom. The teachers have since been fighting for their jobs back, and an appeals court decided that their termination was “shockingly disproportionate,” since both were consenting adults not at the school in an official capacity at the time of the incident.

“The penalty of termination of unemployment is shockingly disproportionate to (their) misconduct,” the Manhattan Appellate Division wrote in their decision. The five-member panel noted that “lesser penalties have been imposed where a teacher had an ongoing relationship or engaged in inappropriate behavior with a student.

Mauro and Brito’s lawyer suggested to the Daily News that they may pursue back pay as well.

Department of Education officials may appeal the decision. If they choose not to, they may still impose less sever penalties against the teachers.

The two were caught undressed in a classroom in 2009 by a janitor. It was later reported that they had a few drinks after school at a local bar, then went back to the school to watch a student performance. At some point, they headed to a darkened classroom and undressed.

At the time, Mauro said she was helping give Brito, who suffers from diabetes, an insulin shot. A state arbitrator later determined that the two were “more likely than not” engaged in a “sexual encounter.”

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