Archive for the tag 'schools'

Source: MyTudut/Flickr

The following is a press release from the offices of State Senator Marty Golden:

State Senator Martin J. Golden (R-C-I, Brooklyn) today is announcing that he has joined forces with Catholic Charities of Brooklyn and Queens to host a back to school collection drive for local students in need.

Residents are being encouraged to donate new school supplies including notebooks, crayons, back packs, pens, pencils, crayons, rulers, highlighters, washable glue sticks, 2-pocket folders, 3 x 5 line Index cards, etc.

Senator Marty Golden stated, “As we turn the calendar on the month of August, we begin to prepare our students and families to go back to school. For some families, the need to get their kids ready to learn and participate in another school year poses a financial challenge, and so we are being asked to help out and make a donation of some essential items. This year I hope that this community will again come together to support our neighbors in need so their children can have the same opportunities this year in the classroom. I hope you will join me in making a donation.”

Those wishing to make a donation of items can drop them off on or before Friday, August 15th at either of Senator Golden’s district offices at 7408-5th Avenue or at 3604 Quentin Road. For more information, please contact the Senator Golden’s office at (718) 238-6044.

Source: flickrized/Flickr

Is your kid the next Roger Federer or Anna Kournikova? They could be, and now there are free programs at local schools to help them get there.

The New York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL) organization launched their free community tennis summer programs for kids earlier this month, and registration continues to be open.

The program provides free use of tennis racquets, qualified instructors and lessons to kids ages 5 to 18. Participants will learn the basics of tennis strokes and how to rally, and then be put to the test in competition with others of similar skill levels.

The summer season kicked off July 7, but there are no deadlines to register and no wait lists to slog through. Registration is done on-site, and parents or guardians must accompany the child during the registration process. It’s a six to eight week program which runs three to six hours a day, five days a week – although schedules vary from site to site.

Locally, kids can sign up and begin playing at the following area schools during the days and times indicated:

  • Andries Hudde Junior High School Playground2500 Nostrand Avenue – Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. – Site director: Bob Spigner
  • P.S. 238 – 1633 East 8th Street - Wednesday and Thursday from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. – Site director: Colin Clarke
  • P.S. 229 – 1400 Benson Avenue - Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. - Site director: Colin Clarke
  • McDonald ParkMcDonald Avenue at Avenue S – Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. – Site director: Gennady Shuminov

More information can be found here. The full list of sites citywide can be found here.

The Brooklyn Public Library has expanded its annual Summer Meals Program, offering no-cost lunch to children and teens ages 18 and under.

It’s a major expansion for the program, run by the New York City Department of Education with federal funds, more than quadrupling it from the six sites available last year.

The program is made to ensure that during the summer months, when kids are out of school, no child or teen will go hungry. The season kicked off June 27 and last until August 29, with lunches served every weekday from 1:15 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. at each of the libraries.

It’s a no-questions-asked policy, and citizenship status is not a factor.

The following local branches are part of the program. Those with asterisks only offer meals from Tuesday to Friday.

For the full list of participating branches, look here.

President Farley Herzek

Herzek (Source: CUNY Newswire)

Kingsborough Community College has appointed Farley Herzek, a New York City native who has most recently been leading the largest community college district in the nation out in California.

The local school has been without a president since the retirement of Dr. Regina Peruggi last summer after nine years serving the school. Peruggi was the first woman at the helm, and oversaw a period of tremendous growth at Kingsborough.

Herzek has been serving as interim president of Los Angeles Harbor College – Los Angeles Community College, and has previously served as interim president of East Los Angeles College.

“It is a privilege to come back to Brooklyn, to serve the communities and the CUNY system that gave me my start in life. I was launched into the middle class because of open access, quality educational programs and the affordability of the CUNY system,” said Herzek in a press release. “I have had an opportunity to meet Kingsborough Community College faculty, staff, alumni and administrators during the interview process and I was very impressed with their passion for doing what is best for students. My beliefs, values and leadership qualities embrace collaboration, full participation, trust, and transparency, while valuing the greatness of our diversity. With all of us of working together, I am certain we can move Kingsborough Community College to the No. 1 position in the nation.”

From CUNY’s press release:

President Herzek’s appointment to Kingsborough is a homecoming for him as a first-generation American who grew up in the Canarsie section of Brooklyn and who was the first in his family to graduate from college. A product of New York City public schools including P.S. 115 and Isaac Bildersee I.S. 68, as well as a graduate of Canarsie High School, President Herzek began his college career at Brooklyn College and earned his Bachelor of Science degree from The City College of New York. He completed his Master of Arts degree and Teaching Credential in Technology Education at California State University, Long Beach, and his Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential from the University of La Verne. President Herzek is also the past Chair of the National Legislative Committee for the Association of Career and Technical Education.

Colgan (Source: P.S. 254)

Colgan (Source: P.S. 254)

Teachers, students and faculty gathered in the cafeteria of P.S. 254 (1801 Avenue Y) yesterday to honor the passing of a longtime school aide by renaming the facility Mary Colgan cafe in her memory.

Colgan served 43 years in the New York City school system, first at P.S. 52 on Nostrand Avenue, and then at P.S. 254, where she stayed for more than 33 years. She passed away from cancer on September 21, 2013.

The beloved school aide was born May 13, 1935, and grew up with a large family of 11 brothers and sisters. She married Ronald Colgan in 1955, and had two children, Donna and Ronald, who she raised in Sheepshead Bay. In addition to her six grandchildren, Colgan found herself with an even larger extended family – that of the entire P.S. 254 community – which grieved her passing.

The Tuesday ceremony featured student performances in her honor, while colleagues, students and her family shared recollections. In addition to renaming the cafeteria, the school is launching the “Mary Colgan – You Have to Believe Award,” which will be given to a student leader who fosters a positive attitude.

Here’s the statement from the school:

Mary Colgan’s NYCDOE Start of Employment was January 1, 1970 at PS 52, and then start of employment in our school, PS 254 was September 8, 1980. She worked in our school for over 33 years. She devoted a great amount of her life to providing the BEST opportunities to students in our school community. From ensuring a safe morning arrival, supervising breakfast being served, requesting busing for school/class trips, monitoring student daily attendance, to calculating after school snacks, calling parents, distributing/receiving/organizing important legal school documents to directing an Extra Curricular After-school program for the Greater Sheepshead Bay; she did it all and then some!

Mary Colgan’s face, spirited voice, and her passionate work mostly took place in our school cafeteria each day. She ensured the safety of our students who arrived early on the school bus, that those students who needed to eat breakfast, did so, timely and that they had enough recess-time before morning line-up at 8am.

Mary was an active, outspoken member of several school committees such as: the SLT, Safety/BRT, Attendance and subcommittee member for various school Performances, such as a Ticket Agent/Distributor and Collector, Ice Cream Purchaser and School Trip Coordinator. She also believed in the importance of UNITY. She diligently represented and supported school DC37 Union members as their Shop Steward. These are just few titles and duties Mary Colgan upheld to the best of her ability however, she did WAY MORE than just maintain these responsibilities.

Mary added joy and sometimes a sprinkle of humor to the school’s Main Office as she sat at her desk situated at the very front counter. She welcomed concerned parents, visitors of many titles; from Mom, Dad, Sibling or Relative to Superintendent, District Representative, Salesperson, Prospective Educator, Substitute or Teaching Observers completing their Educational Prep Courses. Mary was the First Impression of the Heart of our school. She demonstrated the general pulse of the school without hesitation as guests arrived. She always remembered that she herself was a Mother, Sister, Aunt, Grandmother, and Wife and therefore treated our guests as if they were a member of this school family. She never hesitated to help ANYONE or to give a SWEET TREAT to someone in our school community.

Her passion was for the child who needed it the most. Whether their needs included: nurturing, daily structure, routine, a commanding voice, a soft voice with a Grandma-like hug telling them that they are special, a coat, supplies, or some extra food; Mary gave it to them! At times she may have said “I don’t care!” The reality is, she DID care and sometimes she cared so much that she was frustrated with the limited outcomes or results she saw in short time periods. She ALWAYS gave to those special students that may have been looked at as needing a little more than the norm because they held a special place in her heart as she did in theirs!!!!

Mary rarely missed work unless she had to go shopping for more matching JETS or METS apparel to wear on T-Shirt Tuesday. However, on a more serious note, Mary worked through her colds, coughs and illnesses. She truly LOVED coming to our school each and every day. She was frustrated and saddened when she took ill and just couldn’t beat the discomfort she was in. Each day, she attempted to continue to walk the 12 blocks to and from home to get to work. She finally gave in and accepted car rides from her colleagues at least on the days of inclement weather. Mary fought through and made her impact on all of us in our school community, all the way up to the very last day of the 2012-13 School Year.

When we think of Mary Colgan… we think of a STRONG-MINDED, PASSIONATE WOMAN, who was a DEDICATED, ORGANIZED, HARD WORKER, with PRIDE and CONFIDENCE. She was a SPORTS FAN, DAILY NEWS Reader, SMOKER, LOUD & OUTSPOKEN, TELL-YOU-LIKE-SHE-SEES-IT kind of woman. She was SELFLESS and GENEROUS, THOUGHTFUL, THOROUGHLY ENCOURAGING, SUPPORTIVE and truly a GREAT FRIEND! We were very fortunate to have had her in our school community for such a long period of time.

Mary Colgan is and will always be missed at PS 254 but she will remain in our hearts and memories.

The following is a paid announcement from the MBBC/Nash Jew After School Program (330 Neptune Avenue, 3rd Floor):

after-school

MBBC/Nash Jew After School program, located at 330 Neptune Avenue, offers hands-on homework and tutoring help from certified NY teachers and assistants, as well as a slew of excellent programming to grow their world beyond the classroom. With specializations in dance, gymnastics, art, karate and more, we help children become well-rounded individuals.

Our facility also offers music and drama theater, alongside social activities like table tennis and chess. Hot, nutritious lunches are provided to every kid, including soups, fruits, vegetables and juices. We also provide transportation from schools and to homes, a big convenience for working parents.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s what one parent had to say about their experience:

MBBC/Nash Jew After School is great in all aspects. My daughter has been attending MBBC’s afterschool program for three years. Besides completing all of her homework in the program, she enjoys personalized attention from teachers and counselors. Every person working in the program greets us with a smile and positive attitude. Every day, they provide kids with different activities: gymnastics, dancing, chess, arts, and after, she can stay for additional training in a program she enjoys most. For my daughter, it’s dancing and gymnastics. All instruction is available in both English and Russian, which allows my daughter to learn Russian language and use it more. Any time I had a problem picking my daughter up, transportation was available. If she felt sick, I was called immediately. I will definitely use MBBC for years to come and recommend it to everyone.

– Natalie Chernikova – mother of Nastya Berard, student

Our programs are designed for students in pre-kindergarten to middle school, and is certified by the New York State Department of Family and Children Services.

Call (718) 891-1111 or visit our website to sign up now!

The above is a paid announcement by MBBC/Nash Jew Afterschool Program. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

Source: Weinstein's office

Source: Weinstein’s office

The following is an unaltered press release from the offices of Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein:

Thanks to Assemblywoman Weinstein, Students at P.S. 52 learning about the Holocaust and World War II during the month of May, heard personal stories of survival from local Holocaust survivors.

Contrasted with school Holocaust curriculums, the program brought members of New York Association of Holocaust Survivors to present first-person and intimate portraits of the adversities they had to overcome in order to survive. Students had plenty of questions for their guests – most, decorated Russian War Veterans – and were shocked to learn that the survivors had been close to their age when they suffered the described hardships and losses.

“There is little doubt that we are getting dangerously close to a time when we will be unable to hear these stories from the individuals who experienced them,” said Assemblywoman Weinstein. “These students need to hear these heartbreaking accounts of survival in the face of baseless hatred and violence so we can make good on our promise to ‘Never Forget’. I will continue to work with the NYS Association of Holocaust Survivors to bring this crucial program to other area schools.”

Cortez (Source: NYPD)

Cortez (Source: NYPD)

The Friday disappearance of an autistic 14-year-old student kicked off a weekend search throughout Sheepshead Bay and Manhattan Beach, ending this morning when the boy was safely reunited with his family.

Ninth-grader Elicio Cortez went missing after he wrapped up the school day at Leon M. Goldstein High School (1830 Shore Boulevard). Cops tracked his last-known whereabouts down to Voorhies Avenue, near the Sheepshead Bay subway station, where he was caught on surveillance camera.

Cortez was known to spend time in the Coney Island area, and authorities, friends and family fanned out throughout Sheepshead Bay, Manhattan Beach, Brighton Beach and Coney Island, passing out fliers over the weekend as they hoped for his safe return.

They were seen at Bayfest on Sunday, and fliers now hang on nearly every light-pole and bus station in the neighborhood.

Cortez usually takes a yellow school bus home after classes, not mass transportation, which his mother, Nancy Reavis, said he’s unfamiliar with.

The school’s bus driver was the first to tip Reavis off to his disappearance, PIX11 reports:

When his bus driver didn’t see him, she called his mom.

“She tells me, ‘Eliceo is not on the bus.’ She said, ‘[T]hey called him on the loudspeaker at school,’” the frantic mother recalled.

Reavis said she also received a call from the school’s principal who confirmed that her son was not in the school.

The Department of Education said they were assisting with the search.

“School officials are in contact with his mother and we are all deeply concerned about his well-being. Since this situation was identified on Friday we have worked and continue to work closely with NYPD in its investigation,” department officials said in a statement.

Ultimately, Cortez was found at 7 a.m. this morning near Oriental Boulevard in Manhattan Beach, according to the Associated Press. He was unharmed and reunited with his family in Flatbush. It is not yet clear where he spent the weekend.

Reavis told reporters over the weekend that she feared this was a situation bound to happen. She has been urging the school to provide a bus helper to ensure Cortez gets on the school bus after classes, a request the administration has resisted.

CBS reports:

Reavis said that her son went to the train station after leaving Leon Goldstein high. She is angry and said that she has fought with school officials about getting her son a ‘para’ or bus helper to make sure that he makes it home safely.

“I spoke to his counselor and they said ‘yes, we’re gonna do something, we’re gonna do something,’” she said, “This is what has to happen so they can help me?”

cih-student-art

Associate Executive Director Robert Cooper speaks with one of the student artists.

Fifth-grade students from Manhattan Beach’s P.S. 95 (131 Irwin Street) today donated a dozen framed watercolor works they painted to Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway), and they will soon hang in patient areas to help lift patients’ spirits.

The works were produced by the students in Mr. William Lawson’s art class as part of a project called “The Art of Giving,” an annual program coordinated by the United Federation of Teachers to connect elementary school art classes with local hospitals.

cih-student-art3

Student artists pose for a photo with Cooper and teacher William Lawson.

The Art of Giving, now in its fifth year, was inspired by the late Sharon Coates, a teacher at P.S. 156.While Coates was hospitalized, she was presented with student art.

“Seeing the children’s artwork on the walls lifted my spirits,” Coates later said, according to UFT Vice President for Elementary Schools Karen Alford, who was Coates’ union representative at the time. Alford later launched the program and continues to oversee it.

cih-student-art2

A hospital staffer heaps praise on one of the student artists.

While at the hospital for the unveiling ceremony today, the students were treated to cookies and juice – as well as showered with gratitude from hospital staff including Associate Executive Director Robert Cooper and Chief Nurse Terry Mancher.

Mancher in particular was rigorously interrogated by the students, some of whom said they’d like to be doctors or nurses. She told them of the tremendously rewarding experiences she’s had, explained the difference between medical school and nursing school and clarified that, no, doctors are not bosses to the nurses.

She also talked about the vital role Coney Island Hospital nurses played during Superstorm Sandy, when much of the staff stayed on-site even as power in the facility failed, and how they assisted in the evacuation after the storm.

P.S. 255 (Source: Google Maps)

P.S. 255 (Source: Google Maps)

A report of a suspicious device or package on the third floor of P.S. 255 (1866 East 17th Street) spurred police and school administrators to take extra precautions yesterday, evacuating their building and that of Cunningham Junior High School next door.

The evacuation took place at approximately 10:45 a.m., as a large presence from the NYPD arrived on scene – including bomb squad units.

Tipster Mike G. wrote to Sheepshead Bites that kids were taken several blocks away. Adding to the chaos, the school had brought in additional teachers for the day. He writes:

all kids outside three blocks away. Today they brought in teachers from other zones/districts to check tests. As soon as they walked in this morning, the alarm went off and a ton of cops showed up.

Police searched the school but did not find any suspicious device, reports News12.

Students were back in their classrooms by noon.

UPDATE (1:50 p.m.): A parent of a student at P.S. 255 sent us a copy of the note sent home with kids yesterday:

parentnote

Click to enlarge

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