Archive for the tag 'lundys'

Cherry Hill-Lundy's Grand Opening

Cherry Hill opened in 2009. Photo by Ray Johnson.

(UPDATE: 3:30pm): We were just informed that Cherry Hill has been removed from the agenda for Monday and will be pushed back until January.

Original post: 

Community Board 15 is meeting Monday, December 15, at 7:00 p.m. at Kingsborough Community College  (2001 Oriental Boulevard) in the faculty dining room. The meeting is more than a week earlier than their regularly scheduled meeting so that it will not conflict with the holidays.

Among other items, the Board will consider an application for a zoning text amendment from the City Planning Commission to permit food stores with no limitation within the landmarked Lundy’s building (1901 Emmons Avenue) – an alteration requested by Cherry Hill Gourmet Market. The business currently operates in violation of the Sheepshead Bay special zoning district, which dictates the kind of businesses that can operate along the Emmons Avenue waterfront.

Food markets are currently prohibited, and the business opened in 2009 with initial plans to have both a market and restaurant. Though there is a cafe, the restaurant – which was slated to take up 70 percent of the floor space, including the second flood – never materialized. According to owners, that’s because local groups and community leaders including former State Senator Carl Kruger opposed the market use, eventually earning a Stop Work Order that impeded construction.

After five years of operation in violation of zoning, the business is now asking that their food store be allowed. They say they remain one of the building’s only viable tenants and bring jobs to the area, and the change in use will allow them to move forward with plans of establishing a second-floor restaurant. Opponents say, nice as the market may be, legalizing the use would reward a business owner who disregarded the law, and also further weaken the Sheepshead Bay special zoning district intended to preserve the waterfront for recreational use.

Aside from the Cherry Hill Gourmet Market, other items on the Board’s zoning agenda include:

  • 2311 Quentin Road - An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 1963 McDonald Avenue  – An application to legalize a variance for floor area, lot coverage, rear yard and open space regulations.
  • 1620 Shore Boulevard - An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 2018 East 7th Street – An application filed for “Revocable Consent” due to the open steps and garden wall encroaching 5.1 ft beyond the lot line at the front of the property.

In addition to the zoning items, the board’s chairperson and district manager will deliver their monthly reports. There will also be time to hear residents’ concerns and discuss various committee reports, and elected officials may be in attendance.

You can view the full agenda here. Refreshments will be served.

lundys

First they survived Superstorm Sandy’s wrath, and now they’re surviving a fire that drew a massive response of more than 100 firefighters, and left one fireman with minor injuries.

We headed over to the historic Lundy’s building (1901 Emmons Avenue) on Saturday to check in on how the businesses were doing. We’re ecstatic to report that the FDNY response made it seem much worse than it was – and all the businesses on the first floor are back up and running.

Masal Cafe, Cherry Hill Gourmet Market, and Momo – the new name for Momoyama – were all serving patrons this weekend (and, we’re told, Masal and Momo reopened the same day as the fire). Cherry Hill is left with a smokey smell, but the market area appeared largely untouched. The fire began in an air duct in Cherry Hill’s kitchen, and firefighters unfortunately had to tear through the walls around it to extinguish the flames.

That means Cherry Hill’s kitchen is still offline, keeping their cafe and cooked goods area closed. A manager told us on Saturday that hope to partially reopen the kitchen in the next few days, and expect a full return to business in a week or so.

The second floor of Lundy’s was a different story. Home to a couple of medical and law offices, as well as a salon, all the businesses were shuttered on Saturday. It’s unclear if it’s because of damage or just because it was a weekend. The elevator was out of order and in the process of being repaired when we stopped by, and some scars from the fire – primarily holes poked in the ceiling by the FDNY – remain, as you can see in the photo below.

Here’s to wishing all of these businesses a speedy recovery. Make sure to head over there  in the next few days and spend a few bucks to help the businesses along!

lundys-2

lundys-fire-4

Fire broke out at the historic Lundy’s Building (1901 Emmons Avenue) just before 9:30 a.m., drawing a heavy response from the FDNY and leaving one firefighter with a minor injury.

The fire was brought under control after more than an hour of battling the blaze, which appeared to be smoldering on the second floor and in the ventilation shafts along the roof. To accommodate the heavy response, which included FDNY units from as far away as Red Hook, Emmons Avenue was closed to traffic between East 19th Street and East 21st Street, and Ocean Avenue was closed from Emmons Avenue to Shore Parkway north of the Belt Highway.

The FDNY will investigate the cause of the fire, but the preliminary theory is that it was caused by grease in the kitchen of Cherry Hill Gourmet Market, and spread into the kitchen’s air vents which carried it through the building. Flames were visible erupting from the roof of the building.

“I’m not sure when I’ll be back in my office. We don’t know anything yet,” said Dr. Preston Schaffer, a dentist whose office abuts the second-floor kitchen of Cherry Hill. “Thank god the building was built 100 years ago, with all concrete walls.”

Firefighters shattered the windows of his personal office as well as the windows of the market’s kitchen. The responders were also seen along the roof, tearing holes to look down into the building and cutting open the ventilation ducts to extinguish the fire.

One of the first firefighters on scene was left with a minor injury to his back, but is expected to recover. The building was evacuated, and there have been no other injuries.

Electricity and gas to the building were turned off.

As of 11:20 a.m., a large presence remains on the scene, although some units have departed. The public does not yet have access to the building.

View photos, and the on-the-scene updates we made to the original story.

Photo courtesy of Bruce Brodinsky

Photo courtesy of Bruce Brodinsky

It looks like Momoyama, the Japanese hibachi restaurant located in the Lundy’s building at 1901 Emmons Avenue, is opening again soon. Sheepshead Bites reader Bruce Brodinsky sent us the following picture which promises a return to business, nearly a year after Superstorm Sandy closed their doors.

We last checked in on Momoyama in November, when waters from Sandy flooded the establishment nearly six feet high. At the time, the grills were seen flipped over and rusting while the chairs were strewn all over the floor. As we pointed out on the plus side, the famous birthday drum was thankfully spared Sandy’s wrath.

It’ll be good to have Momoyama open again, the sooner the better. Thanks to Bruce B. for the photo.

Momoyama, the Japanese hibachi joint inside the hard-hit Lundy’s building at 1901 Emmons Avenue, only just began their cleanup efforts on Friday.

When we stopped by, workers were there getting wooden boards up to secure the location, after Sandy’s flood waters battered the door. Like other establishments in Lundy’s ground level, Momoyama received upwards of six feet of water.

And it shows.

The restaurant’s table-sized grills, where so many of us have gathered for high school friends’ birthdays, were flipped and rusting on the floor, and chairs were scattered about. Although the water drained, it still had the musty-meets-salt-water smell we’ve gotten used to around here.

On the upside? The birthday drum on the wall seems to have survived unscathed. When they get back on their feet, we’ll be sure to visit and pretend it’s our birthday.

Source: qualityolstuff via Ebay

An original table menu holder from Lundy’s Restaurant came on the buyer’s block on eBay.

The famous seafood restaurant opened in 1934 or 1935 to 1977 or 1979, and then again from 1997 to early 2007. Currently, Cherry Hill Market has taken over the old Lundy’s space at 1901 Emmons Avenue.

The menu holder is marked on both sides with the letters “F.W.I.L.,” standing for “Frederick William Irving Lundy.” The bottom is stamped by the maker, M. Goldberg Coney Is. Wear-Bright.

It sold for $51.16 after three bids. The lucky winner gets to have a piece of local history. Wish I had placed a bid!

Bay Improvement Group President Steve Barrison spoke at last night’s Sheepshead Bay / Plumb Beach Civic Association meeting, explaining the importance of the neighborhood’s Special Purpose District, and urged residents to join in protecting it.

The presentation came as Barrison and others seek to unite and fight off plans to exempt Cherry Hill Gourmet Market from the district’s mandates, though the market inside the historic Lundy’s building was never specifically named during the meeting.

Continue Reading »

Cherry Hill Gourmet Market at Lundys in Sheepshead Bay

Photo by Ray Johnson

We’ve long covered the struggles of Cherry Hill Gourmet Market and its owners, who dumped millions into renovating the space in the historically landmarked Lundy’s building (1901 Emmons Avenue) only to face opposition from local leaders about zoning and preservation violations.

To sum it up: some local leaders and activists bristled that Cherry Hill’s owners gave more floor space to its grocery store than its restaurant, in violation of the Sheepshead Bay Special Waterfront District that permits only waterfront and recreational use. Then, some of their renovations were called into question, including pulling Lundy’s historic metal signs and ripping out the sidewalk insignia (the signs were later cleaned and replaced; the insignia is preserved in storage). And, most recently, the operators went before the Landmarks Preservation Committee to settle fines, and agreed to make minor changes, including a barrier around mechanical units that violated the LPC rules. And we noted then that the owners still need to approach the City Planning committee and fight for a change in zoning to legalize its usage as a supermarket.

A costly nuisance to the business owner? Definitely. A tough fight? Surely. A bloody 11-year “nation-building” battle with a death toll in the thousands? Well, according to Cherry Hill’s business owner, that hits the mark.

Read what Cherry Hill’s owner had to say, and why we think this isn’t an ethnic battle as the Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Cherry Hill Gourmet Market at Lundys in Sheepshead Bay

Photo by Ray Johnson

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Committee approved an application by the owners of Cherry Hill Gourmet Market to legalize a series of alterations they made to the landmarked Lundy’s building during an August 2 hearing, tying no strings to the landlord despite outrage from community leaders.

The hearing reviewed Cherry Hill Gourmet Market’s (1901 Emmons Avenue) alterations, which include several changes made during the property’s renovation two years ago to convert it from a restaurant space to a market. Preservationists hoped that the owner, David Isaev, would be forced to pay to undo changes and restore it into compliance, but the committee gave the greenlight to all the changes, including the most contentious ones – the installation of a large external air conditioning unit adjacent to the back wall, and changes to the sidewalk.

Now Bay Improvement Group President Steve Barrison is slamming the decision, calling it a disgrace and saying it weakens landmark preservation laws citywide.

Read Barrison’s strongly-worded letter regarding the LPC decision.

Cherry Hill Gourmet Market at Lundys in Sheepshead Bay

Photo by Ray Johnson

New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Committee announced late last week that they’re going forward with a public hearing tomorrow, August 2, regarding violations at the landmarked Lundy’s building by Cherry Hill Gourmet Market, outraging local activists who say they’re being left out of the process.

The hearing will review Cherry Hill Gourmet Market’s (1901 Emmons Avenue) move to legalize alterations to the building currently in violation of the property’s landmark status. The alterations include several changes made during the property’s renovation two years ago to convert it from a restaurant space to a market, including signs in the windows, a large external air conditioning unit adjacent to the back wall, changes to the sidewalk and parts of the building removed for the installation of awnings. If the move fails to garner approval from the LPC, the business owner – David Isaev – could be required to pay to undo the changes and restore it to compliance.

But after waiting nearly two years to challenge the legalization attempt, at least one local group is saying the LPC’s short notice cuts out the community.

“This is an outrage. This is the first we hear of a hearing,” said Bay Improvement Group President Steve Barrison, whose civic group helped fight for Lundy’s landmark status in 1989 and has helped take care of the property during its neglected years. “Our members have called 311 to complain [about the violations] for over a year. I have called to LPC and never received a call back. I have emailed LPC and never received a response.”

Find out what’s at stake, and the entire Lundy’s-Cherry Hill back story.

Next »