Archive for the tag 'kingsborough community college'

THE COMMUTE: I asked if that was the case back in 2010 when I documented 14 buses in a row bypassing bus stops after loading up at Kingsborough Community College. Since then I have done numerous B1 updates documenting service problems. I have written many times to the last two directors of Bus Operations over the past five years. Each time, I promptly received courteous replies and have met with a half dozen operating personnel on about four occasions, assured that the problem would be addressed and Manhattan and Brighton Beach passengers would not be ignored . Yet the problem persists.

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Source: Wikipedia

Click to enlarge. Source: Wikipedia

Under the direction of Conductor Mark Mangini, the Kingsborough Musical Society Chorus — together with The Brooklyn Community Wind Ensemble and Concert Band, conducted by Dr. Raymond Wheeler — will be performing their annual holiday concert this coming Sunday, December 15 at 2:00 p.m.

Among the selections being performed by the chorus will be a medley from Lerner and Loewe’s “My Fair Lady,” as well as other holiday favorites.

Admission is free to the public, and parking is free on campus. No tickets are required, and seating is first come first served. The performance will be held at Kingsborough Community College’s Leon M. Goldstein Performing Arts Center, 2001 Oriental Boulevard.

For more, call the Kingsborough Community College Box Office at (718) 368-5596.

Photo from a previous BBT performance of Nutcracker.

Photo from a previous BBT performance of The Nutcracker.

by Jennifer Szulman

The 27-year-old Brighton Ballet Theater/School of Russian American Ballet (BBT) will be one of only three schools in Brooklyn this winter to perform a version of the classic ballet The Nutcracker, and theirs will offer a distinct telling featuring inspiration from the neighborhood’s various cultures.

Since 1995, BBT has remained the only dance school in Brooklyn to perform The Nutcracker. This year, however, they will be one of three local schools to perform the ballet, and will feature more than 40 young dancers alongside seasoned professionals. Cheographed by Edouard Kouchnarev, the 55-minute-long production draws nuanced inspiration from a Russian Nutcracker-inspired cartoon, and a heartwarming tale of diversity aimed at a young audience.

In this particular version, a young girl similar to Disney’s Cinderella becomes a princess. It is good to simplify an otherwise intricate plot for little children, BBT’s owner said, because they can understand what is happening. Most of the parts are danced by kids and instead of ending in The Land of Sweets, this version finishes in the Land of Cultures, where all the cultures flourish together – not unlike their adopted Southern Brooklyn community.

Founded in 1987, creating the prestigious school took perseverance, drive and the childhood dream of a young dancer.

As an immigrant from the Soviet Union, Irina Roizin aspired to open her own dance school. These dreams came to life when she saw a newspaper advertisement about a small ballet school open on Avenue M. Lessons were held in a quaint living room where three students were trained by a former student of Russian ballet teacher Agrippina Vaganova. At the time, the school had no owner and was funded by the parents of the three students. The teacher and Roizin eventually worked together to create a program for young children. In time, Roizin moved the school to Brighton Beach.

Roizin taught for nearly three decades, growing it to accommodate approximately 400 children per year.

“Our goal is to serve the community,” Roizin said. “Over 27 years, about 15 of our students became professional dancers. We do achieve our goal by bringing up professional dancers but the main thing is to give all children an opportunity to dance professional scale ballet. Even if they’re not going to become dancers, they will take something from this that they can bring to a different profession.”

For those who wish to become masters of the craft, ballet helps dancers develop a skill set used to shape not only themselves physically, but also emotionally and socially.

“This is disciplined, something that gives children an opportunity to be closer to arts, to change their personality, ideas, what music they’ll listen to,” Roizin said. “It’s not too many kids that understand classical music, can be disciplined about themselves, about what they eat. We realize that most of the kids that take ballet for a lot of years do better in school. It’s better attention, social skills and self-esteem. It helps them in a lot of ways.”

Professional dancers are invited to the school for young students to learn from, allowing the children to see what can come from their dedication and hard work.

The non-profit BBT continues to grow its services, recently opening up a pilot program for children with autism, and offers scholarships to students with need.

“We never turn a child away,” Roizon said.

For parents thinking this is just a place to drop their kids off for a play date, though, Roizon points out that she aims to train the best of the best.

“When kids come and parents tell the child, ‘Okay, go have fun!’ I always say, no, you can have fun at the park,” Roizin said. “You don’t have to pay money to have fun. They come here to work and learn something. Maybe this is a little bit of a different approach. The parents who understand stay with us and understand that whatever we do, we do to help parents raise intelligent, educated children. The kids need to understand that it’s fun when they dance and wear costumes and perform, but it’s also hard work.”

BBT will perform The Nutcracker on Saturday, December 21 at 6:30 p.m. The performance will be held at the Leon M. Goldstein Performing Arts Center at Kingsborough Community College, 2001 Oriental Boulevard. For tickets, call (718) 769-9161.

Click to enlarge

THE COMMUTE: Before we talk about the anniversary, first some questions the MTA needs to answer regarding the data we presented yesterday regarding eastbound B1 service at Coney Island Avenue and Brighton Beach Avenue.
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The B1 bus, en route to Kingsborough Community College

THE COMMUTE: More about the anniversary tomorrow, but first an update regarding B1 bus service. Last Monday, I noticed a steady stream of college students, about 30 of them, walking a mile and a half from the Brighton Beach train station to Kingsborough Community College (KCC) a little past 9:00 a.m. I haven’t monitored B1 service in awhile, so I figured it was about time for an update. This past Wednesday, I decided to watch the buses arriving and leaving the station. I intended to get there for the morning peak. I know it gets very crowded just before 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. classes. However, I didn’t arrive until 9:15 a.m. Approximately eight buses left the station, just around 9:00 a.m. All of them were full or at least had a seated load. It seemed like service was running pretty well. I didn’t expect to find too many problems since it was already after 9:00 a.m. What I saw surprised me.

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KCC

KCC  (2001 Oriental Boulevard)

Like many institutions in Southern Brooklyn, Kingsborough Community College (2001 Oriental Boulevard), was wrecked by Superstorm Sandy last year. NY1 is reporting how the school has generally fared since the storm, tracking its recovery and progress in the wake of the disaster.

When the winds and waters of Sandy blasted through the area last year, the KCC Maritime Technology area located in Sheepshead Bay was left heavily damaged. While declaring that work still needed to be done, Merchant Marine Captain and Program Director Anthony DiLernia commented on the experience of trying to fix the school, and some of the remaining mess.

“We learned from the storm how to reconfigure our marina. Half the marina was destroyed by the storm,” DiLernia said.

The report noted how  the storm surge battered the campus, heavily damaging the infrastructure and buildings of the college. Despite the damage, the school reopened one week later. NY1 described how getting the school operating again ultimately helped in the recovery process for the faculty, staff and students working at the institution:

The school also went to bat for 2,500 students and faculty members impacted by the storm. Many lost their homes and belongings, including books and computers. The college set up an emergency food and clothing distribution center and started a fundraising campaign to further assist them.

“We were able to raise over $200,000 to provide financial support to these people who were in need,” [Elizabeth] Basile said. “Students can still come and request additional financial support and if it’s needed and we can provide that kind of support we will.”

In case you need a little reminder of what Sandy was like, here’s a video we ran, filmed on the school’s premises (by DiLernia, I believe) as the water came crashing through:

Despite all exhaustive and continuing recovery process, KCC still managed to rank among the best community colleges in the country. In March, we reported on Kingsborough ranking in the top four of community colleges nationwide by the Aspen Institute.

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The cast and crew of Law & Order: SVU arrived on the shores of Kingsborough Community College (2001 Oriental Boulevard) yesterday, turning the school into a Coast Guard base – and the site of a murder investigation.

Michael Goldstein, the school’s director of Enrollment Marketing and Public Outreach, tipped us off to the shoot, which used several interior and exterior locations on the campus.

The episode revolves around a murder on a Coast Guard base. It’s not totally implausible – the school used to be a military base and was the location of the Sheepshead Bay Merchant Marine Naval Base in the 1940s. Many of its “T” buildings were once barracks that have been repurposed as classrooms and administrative buildings.

Building on that, Goldstein said the producers put some extra touches to bring the base to life.

“We had about 50 extras dressed in Coast Guard uniforms, two SUV’s with Coast Guard insignias, and they made up the whole college including the North Gate and T-7 building” to look the part, Goldstein said. He added that they built a brig/jail cell as well, as shown in the accompanying photos.

“It’s history repeating itself, from the Sheepshead Bay Merchant Marine Naval Base of the 40′s to today,” he mused.

Most of the show’s star cast members were on hand, including Ice-T, Mariska Hargitay and Dan Florek, and took photos with students and faculty.

I’m just peeved I missed two opportunities: 1) to fulfill my dream of being an extra on SVU and 2) to pitch a new spin-off series, Law & Order: Munch.

Enjoy the photos.

View the photos.

Authorities fished the unconscious body of Vladislav Cheloudko, 41, out of the Rockaway Inlet behind Kingsborough Community College yesterday afternoon, in what appears to be a boating excursion gone bad.

Police arrived at the Manhattan Beach-based school (2001 Oriental Boulevard) at approximately 5:00 p.m. Sunday. He was rushed to Coney Island Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

DNAinfo reports:

Police are investigating Cheloudko’s death, but said it was possible the man had been kayaking or sailing and lost control of his vessel, a spokesman said.

The medical examiner will determine his cause of death.

Cheloudko, a Brooklyn resident, was pulled from the waters behind Kingsborough’s Marine Center. According to News 12, he was unconscious at the time of his removal from the water, and police attempted CPR before transporting him to the hospital.

Daily News reports that he was “found upside down in the waters.”

Photo by Erica Sherman

Photo by Erica Sherman

Kingsborough Community College (2001 Oriental Boulevard) was rewarded with millions of federal dollars today thanks to the efforts of Senator Charles Schumer. According to a press release, Schumer secured $3.8 million for the award-winning institution for the purposes of helping the college continue its mission to train students for the jobs of tomorrow.

This isn’t the first time that KCC has been on the winning end of a financial windfall. In March, we reported that the college was awarded $100,000 by the Aspen Institute after being named the one of the top three community colleges in the nation. The praise also came from the 2012 Digital Community Colleges Survey, which in October, named KCC as one of the top community colleges to implement technology.

Schumer’s release described where the grant money came from:

The grants are part of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grant Program, which promotes skills development and employment opportunities in fields such as advanced manufacturing, transportation and healthcare as well as science, technology, engineering and math careers through partnerships between training providers and local employers.

In his comments, Schumer reflected on the importance of funding institutions like KCC and Laguardia Community College, which also received $3.1 million:

“Training our young people today for the jobs of tomorrow will pave the path to keeping New York City at the top of the heap for generations to come. These grants are a game-changer for Kingsborough Community College and LaGuardia Community College because the funds will now provide much-needed career training programs for our New York City students,” said Schumer. “New York City’s Silicon Alley is in need of individuals who excel in math, science, engineering and technology and I am confident that this $7 million investment will be beneficial to New York’s economy and the future of these students.”

sunken-ship

It’s amazing how quickly nature takes its toll on man-made objects. And even more amazing how long it takes to clean it all up.

The photo above was sent to us by Michael Goldstein, director of Enrollment Marketing and Public Outreach at Kingsborough Community College (2001 Oriental Boulevard).

Goldstein said that the vessel sank during Superstorm Sandy and, nearly a year later, has yet to be pulled from the Bay’s muck. In just the past year, algae has sprouted all over it and chunks have rotted away, with barnacles attaching themselves to what remains. It’s also proven quite the home for fish to take refuge in, although they’re not as safe as they think: Goldstein witnessed an unidentified bird dive into the water to scoop its lunch out.

Goldstein wrote to us:

Took this one of a sunken ship from Sandy in Sheepshead bay-by the Kingsborough Marina. You should see the Barnacles all over it. A very small school of fish was swimming in and out of it and a bird brown with a long beak was diving down and chowing on them.

He added that as FEMA money begins pouring in, the school will begin rebuilding the docks destroyed by Sandy soon.

Anyone know of any other boats sunken by Sandy still wallowing in the murky depths of the Bay?

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