Archive for the tag 'journalism'

Author Paul Moses. Source: Random House, Inc.

As part of the Turkish Cultural Center Brooklyn’s (TCC Brooklyn) “Media Talks” series, the Amity School will host Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Marine Park resident Paul Moses, who will discuss “How to Build a Career in Media,” Monday, February 4 at 3:00 p.m. The discussion will be held inside the Amity School, 3867 Shore Parkway between Brigham Street and Knapp Street, right off the Belt Parkway.

If Moses’ name rings a bell, that’s because, in the days following Superstorm Sandy, the teacher of journalism at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism submitted to us his first local reporting piece in decades, about hard-hit Gerritsen Beach being virtually ignored both in their recovery efforts and by much of the mainstream media.

To learn more about Moses and the event, click here. RSVP by emailing rsvp@tccbrooklyn.org.

Photo by Erica Sherman

Edward R. Murrow High School’s newspaper, The Murrow Network, has been bringing scores of readers news that matters from that school’s community since 1974. Now, after 38 years in existence, the Network can officially boast that it is the “Best High School Newspaper in New York City,” according to NYC High School Journalism Collaborative and members of New York City’s press corps — an honor that would likely make the famed broadcasting journalist after whom the school (1600 Avenue L) was named pretty proud.

The Network — whose most recent stories include a feature on how the Murrow community came together for the benefit of Hurricane Sandy victims, as well as a moving remembrance of Sandy victim and Murrow alum Jessie Streich-Kest by English teacher John Faciano — earned the top honors for its “school coverage and excellent stories” during the Newsies!, an annual high school journalism conference at Baruch College, the collaborative’s sponsor.

Reporters from the Network earned individual honors as well:

Murrow senior Adelina Zhang took first place in Community News for her story on the stabbing that occurred on Ave. M last year. Graduate Sasha Williams also won first place in the National/World News category for her coverage on how the school was creating backpack care packages to give students in Indiana whose town was destroyed by a tornado. Finally Murrow graduate Zalika Cuffy-Scott finished in second place in the School News category. She wrote a story on how the cafeteria was charging for its food, which was a change from the previous year.

Reporting in and around the vicinity of your high school is as hyper-local as it gets. In these days of corporate takeovers and rampant sensationalism in the news media, we applaud The Murrow Network for keeping it real.

Paul Moses, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Marine Park resident, spoke before the Madison-Marine-Homecrest Civic Association on Thursday, discussing the media’s lackluster response to Southern Brooklyn’s disaster zones in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

“There’s been some brilliant journalism in recent days, but there was a slow start in reporting the extent of the storm’s impact,” said Moses. “I think it’s fair to say that Southern Brooklyn has gotten relatively little media attention.”

Moses said that the citywide press did some stellar reporting, exemplified by stories about the state’s and city’s role in the gas shortage, the Long Island Power Authority’s failures, and the struggles at city housing projects.

But in the first days after the storm, Moses said there were few stories that focused on Southern Brooklyn and Queens, though the press was quick to report in the immediate aftermath at locations like downtown Manhattan, Red Hook, New Jersey and Staten Island. It wasn’t until several days – and sometimes more than a week – that communities like Gerritsen Beach, Manhattan Beach and Sheepshead Bay found their way into the newspapers.

Frustrated by the problem, Moses decided to do his first local reporting piece in decades, submitting a story to Sheepshead Bites about the trials Gerritsen Beach residents faced in their recovery efforts.

But media should have been on the scene in these neighborhoods immediately after the storm, he said, in order to convey the most important and useful information for victims and those looking to help.

“In a time of disaster, the journalist’s role is to notify the public of impending danger and to give people the vital information they need, and to tell people where the damage is, and to tell the stories of the people who’ve been affected,” said Moses. “Through what we report on, the public at large finds out where the greatest needs are after the disaster and often will respond accordingly.”

“I really found the overall coverage in the first few days disappointing,” Moses added.

Whaddya Want?


As it says in the blurb to the right, Sheepshead Bites, the Bay’s first and only blog, will cover community meetings, development issues, local politics, interesting people, happenings and cool new places. But while that’s a mouthful, it’s not exactly saying much of substance. Which issues? What angle – if any – will we take on the meetings? Who are these so-called “interesting people”? What the heck is a “happening”?!

Well, dear readers, while we’ve got some ideas of our own, we’d much rather hear yours. So hit us up, and tell us exactly what you’d like us to cover and how you’d like us to cover it. Also, feel free to tell us about any neat-o features you’d like to see on the site, what you think of the site design, what community-related websites and papers you read, and where you think coverage is in short supply. Got nothing to say? Don’t fret! Feel free to just say hi and let us know who you are.

We can’t wait to hear from you, Sheepshead Bay!

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Answering the Call


Several years ago, as a college undergraduate, I sat in my journalism ethics class and watched as other young, idealistic students discussed the implications of a blog posting something-or-other. Heated arguments shot back and forth — back then blogging was a new term, its relationship to journalism tenuous, and its ethics questionable. After a few minutes of impassioned debate, the professor, a tough-as-nails 4-foot-high sack of wrinkles, called on me. “What do you think, Ned?”

I rubbed the groggy, glazed look out of my eyes and attempted a composed, studious demeanor — but only achieved what can best be described as a diligent apathy — and I began, “Well, if I were ever so lowly as to blog…”

And now, here we are.

Welcome to Sheepshead Bites.

Read about our mission and motivation after the jump.

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About


Prologue

Several years ago, as a college undergraduate, I sat in my journalism ethics class and watched as other young, idealistic students discussed the implications of a blog posting something-or-other. Heated arguments shot back and forth — back then blogging was a new term, its relationship to journalism tenuous, and its ethics questionable. After a few minutes of impassioned debate, the professor, a tough-as-nails 4-foot-high sack of wrinkles, called on me. “What do you think, Ned?”

I rubbed the groggy, glazed look out of my eyes and attempted a composed, studious demeanor — but only achieved what can best be described as a diligent apathy — and I began, “Well, if I were ever so lowly as to blog…”

And now, here we are.

Welcome to Sheepshead Bites.

Answering the Call

Sheepshead Bites began in response to the observation during the Third Annual Brooklyn Blogfest in May 2008 that my neighborhood, among others, are seriously “under blogged.”

Well, I’ll show them.

Unfortunately, the Brooklyn blogorati have a point. Many of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods still filled with genuine Brooklynites feature local characters and compelling, complex issues, but are going under-reported in both the established media and the nebulous Brooklyn blogroll. And while most of our neighbors sink further into either apathy or Monday morning quarterback-style governance, our communities are going on without us. They’re leaving their flair and character behind and moving forward in erratic, worrisome ways.

Now it’s time we steal from the digital toolbox, and present our neighbors with useful, well-explained information and foster debate on the issues of our day.

Our Beat

Community meetings, development issues, local politics, interesting people, happenings and cool new places — these are just some of the topics the Bite will sink its teeth into. And what will set us apart from any other great blogs in the area is our humor and irreverence, blended in with the same passion and concern that comes from our colleagues.

Why Sheepshead Bites

The name of this blog is more ambiguous than most guess at first glance. Many think it’s negative. “Bites” as in stinks, sucks, is a bore, et cetera.

But there’s also bites as in news bites – small, easy to read blurbs that keep our neighbors informed. Or bites as in what fish do. Or bites, a variation of bight – another word for a bay. It could also be in reference to the wince-inducing act of biting – a biting joke or insult, or even the biting truth.

The idea of “Bites” for this site was most inspired by the mad-looking characteristics of the fish this bay was named for, the Sheepshead, with it’s jagged grin and giant, humanoid teeth.

But back to that negative intonation of “Bites”… we’d be lying if it didn’t play a role. “Bites”, as in, this place was once called Brooklyn’s Gold Coast, as in it was once rich and thriving, a resort community hosting the finest restaurants and entertainment. “Bites” as in we once had a fishing fleet of dozens, where now there is less than 12. “Bites” as in where we’re going, compared to from whence we’ve come.

“Bites” as in a warning.

Again, welcome to Sheepshead Bites. Angling for a better Bay.

Ned Berke
Editor