Archive for the tag 'jewish holidays'

Source: Ephox Blog

Alternate side of the street parking regulations for street cleaning purposes will be suspended tomorrow and Thursday, June 4 and June 5 in observance of the Jewish holiday of Shavuos. All other regulations, including parking meters, shall remain in effect.

You can also check out the rest of the 2014 parking calendar here.

Source: Dara Skolnick/Flickr

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Monday and Tuesday for Passover.

All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can download your own 2014 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar from the NYC DOT’s website.

Source: Dara Skolnick/Flickr

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Tuesday through Friday, April 15 to 18 for Passover, Holy Thursday, and Good Friday. Wednesday is the anniversary of the Rush-Bagot Treaty, establishing the border between the United States and Canada, and we think the Department of Transportation is also looking to honor this, although they have not said so.

All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can download your own 2014 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar from the NYC DOT’s website.

The burning of the chametz. Source: Dudy Tuchfeld / Flickr

The burning of the chametz. Source: Dudy Tuchfeld / Flickr

Beginning next week, in advance of the Jewish commemoration of Passover, there will be special Sanitation collections for residents who live within Community Board (CB) 15. You can find out if you live within the boundaries of CB15 by clicking on this link.

Next Monday, April 14, all of CB15 will receive regular garbage and recycling collection. You should place all your garbage out for collection on Sunday evening, April 13, after 5:00 p.m. Recycling and regular garbage need to be separated.

For your convenience, a public Dumpster will be located at the following locations on the morning of Monday, April 14, and will be removed before nightfall:

  • James Madison High School Sports Field on the south side of Quentin Road between East 27th Street and East 28th Street
  • In front of 2810 Nostrand Avenue, corner of Kings Highway and Nostrand Avenue

Burning Chametz

People in charge of burning Chametz (food deemed unkosher for Passover), either in front of a home or a synagogue, must ensure that the fires are small and controlled so that the Fire Department does not need to be called to respond to an “out of control fire.” Here are some rules that must be observed for the burning of chametz.

  • All fires must be supervised by a mature, responsible adult
  • No paint thinner, aerosol cans, sprays, lighter fluid or any other flammable liquids are to be used to ignite the fire. These items have caused accidents and are extremely dangerous
  • Water, fire extinguishers, or sand should be readily available at the site of the chametz burning
  • Do not burn chametz enclosed in aluminum foil
  • Chametz should be put at the curb in plastic bags. This will eliminate the necessity for retrieving and washing out garbage cans
  • Do not park cars on smoldering embers

Your cooperation in following the schedule and observing these safety precautions will expedite the pickup. The chametz burning should end at 11:36 a.m., Monday, April 14.

A traditional Passover seder plate. Source: Wikipedia

A traditional Passover seder plate. Source: Wikipedia

For the fifth year in a row, the Be Proud Foundation will host its annual Passover Food Distribution Event, tomorrow, April 10, from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Aqua Health Rehabilitation Center, 2753 Coney Island Avenue.

More than 600 people of limited means will join Be Proud and its friends at the annual event. Recipients will be able to take home kosher food packages for Passover, including matzah, the “bread of affliction” and symbol of salvation and deliverance.

This event is made possible because of the generosity of private donations.

“Passover is the best time for us to show that we care about our neighbors. By giving out food we are going to share our happiness with the people who count on us more than ever in this current economic climate,” said Raisa Chernina, executive director of the Be Proud Foundation.

A previous Kings Bay Y Purim Carnival (Photo by Erica Sherman)

Let the Purim festivities begin! The Jewish holiday is just around the corner, kicking off Saturday evening and ending on Sunday. Celebrating the story of Esther, who rose to become queen of Persia, and who foiled the evil Haman’s plans to eradicate the Jews, it’s a time for the children of Israel to boogie down with food, drinks and costumes – as well as gifts to the needy.

To help you find your party, here’s a list of local Purim events this weekend, with some for the kids and families, and some for adults eager to cut a rug to celebrate their people. L’chaim!

Purim and Costume Party At Congregation Israel of Kings Bay Saturday, March 15, 8:00 – 3903 Nostrand Avenue - The party kicks of with the Megillah reading at 8:20 p.m., followed by celebration at 9:00 p.m. Hamantashen, graggers, Purim bags, prizes and raffles! Donations suggested. Call (718) 934-5176 for details.

Purim Party at Chabad of Sheepshead Bay Saturday, March 15, 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. – 1315 Avenue Y - A kids Purim party with Megillah reading, magic show, free cotton candy and popcorn. Admission: $5/child, free for adults. For more information, call (718) 934-9331.

Purim Carnival at Kings Bay YSunday, March 16, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. – 3495 Nostrand Avenue – A community celebration with free hamantashen, giveaways, kosher food, music and fun. There will be rides for children, carnival games and other entertainment. Admission: free. Contact: Alina at 718-648-7703 ext. 224 or info@kingsbayy.org.

Purim Celebration at Shorefront Y - Sunday, March 16, 2:00 p.m. – 3300 Coney Island Avenue - Costume contests, delicious treats and kid’s activities. There will also be a performance of “A Poppy Seed Purim,” a lighthearted musical of the Biblical story of Esther. Admission is $8 per person, and free for kids under three. Call 718-646-1444 for more information.

Purim Party w/Circus Entertainment at Chabad of Kings Highway Sunday, March 16, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. – 815 Kings Highway, third floor - Amazing acrobats, hot dogs and hamantashen, live music and face painting. Come in costume for this celebration! Admission: free w/RSVP or $5 at the door ($10 for families). Call (718) 998-5394 to RSVP.

Western-Style Purim - Sunday, March 16, 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. – Produced by Chabad of Sheepshead Bay, hosted at S.L.C. Social Hall, 805 Avenue T - A western-themed party, where attendees will help “rustle up all the Haman bandits.” Guests should come in Western attire, enjoy a buffet dinner, a reptile show, live music and Megilla reading. Admission: $36/adults, $15/children. Call (718) 934-9331 for reservations. Must RSVP by March 13.

Purim Night Out for Young Professionals & Parents - Sunday, March 16, 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. – 10007 4th Avenue – Leave the kids at home, or, for free, with Kings Bay Y’s child caretakers, and go party your ‘tashen off. Kings Bay Y is organizing this night out at Cats Club in Bay Ridge. Admission gets you two glasses of wine, valet, discount on future drinks, live DJ and finger foods. Admission in advance: $40/person, $70 for couple. Admission at the door: $45/person, $80/couple. For more info or to reserve, contact Angela at (718) 648-7703 ext. 223.

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A fraylichen Chanukah!

The Shorefront Y (3300 Coney Island Avenue) ushered in the festival of lights with a community celebration this past Sunday, December 1. Hundreds of community members attended the free event that celebrated the Jewish holiday, and featured fun, food and entertainment for all.

There was an incredible puppet show, children’s book readings in a custom-made Dr. Seuss reading room, and arts and crafts. Children’s Scholastic books were also on sale to help raise money for the institution’s special needs children, seniors and early childhood programs.

Check out the photos below, courtesy of the Shorefront Y.

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Source: mehjg / Flickr

Source: mehjg / Flickr

Alternate side of the street parking regulations for street cleaning will be suspended Thursday and Friday, September 26-27 in observance of Shemini Atzereth and Simchas Torah. All other regulations, including parking meters, shall remain in effect. You can download your own 2013 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar — in English, as well as in ChineseHaitian Creole, Italian, Korean, Russian or Spanish (all PDFs) — from the NYC DOT’s website.

Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

Click to enlarge

There will be at least two — count ’em, two — Sukkot events for the community this Sunday, both of which promise tons of food, entertainment, music, dancing, and much more.

  • Congregation Israel of Kings Bay: Congregation Israel of Kings Bay invites the Jewish community to their annual Simchas Bais Hashoava, a celebration — and in this case, a pizza party — held during the intermediate days of Sukkos. The party will be held September 22 at 7:30 inside Congregation Israel of Kings Bay, 3903 Nostrand Avenue, corner of Voorhies Avenue. For information, call (718) 615-1549 or (718) 934-5176. The event is free, although a donation is suggested.
  • Chabad of Sheepshead Bay: Chabad of Sheepshead Bay invites the invites the community to join them at their Annual Sukkos Street Festival, featuring a 4D theater, arcade games, laser tag and U:launcher (Ed. — Whatever that is), pony rides, face-painting, popcorn, hotdogs, and more. All the fun takes place September 22 from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on East 14th Street between Avenue X and Avenue Y. Be sure to stick around for the magic show at 4:30 p.m. To learn more, including prices, click to enlarge the flier above, or go to www.chabadsheepsheadbay.com.
Photo by PayPaul

Photo by PayPaul

This evening marks the first night of Sukkot, and observant Jewish families across the community are erecting booths – called a sukkah – where they will gather, eat and (in some cases) sleep for the next seven days.

Some neighbors, however, are irked by one storefront congregation’s sukkah, which bulks out into the middle of the sidewalk.

Congregation Bnei Shelomo Vyaffa at 1305 Gravesend Neck Road has set up a sukkah that takes as much as two-thirds of the sidewalk, leaving less room for pedestrians to slip by.

Reader PayPaul sent us the following e-mail, expressing his displeasure:

Could this Jewish Temple on Neck Road and East 13th Street shown some more tact and respect towards their neighbors by informing them in advance of their installation of a Sukkot tent that blocks the sidewalk considerably in front of their East 13th Street entrance? They could have at least apologized for the inconvenience in advance. That would have gone a long way in ameliorating any upset people.

You and others have to see it for yourselves. I even asked them about it. First they claimed to have a permit and then changed their story to say the 61st precinct told them it wasn’t worth the time as it would take too long to process. Meanwhile I know their next door neighbor is very upset over it. Imagine some elderly or handicapped people trying to get by this obstacle?

Another person took to Reddit to say the same:

It’s that time of year again! Sukkot. My friend took this picture of a Sukkot Tent outside of a business in Brooklyn. I live in Midwood so I see these everywhere but it’s usually on residential property and not always out on the sidewalk like this.

I know that certain laws have variances and loopholes for religious observance but I’m not sure this qualifies as legal. IT’s a pretty unsafe obstruction! My dad used to get tickets because he had a SIGN on the Sidewalk by the Curb. This just can’t be legal can it?

Anyone have more info on the issue?

We reached out the Department of Buildings to find out if there are any regulations concerning this. They said they do not oversee the construction of structures this small, but that we should reach out to the Department of Transportation to see if they have any policy’s regarding the sidewalk use. We haven’t yet heard back from them.

We could not find contact information for the congregation to seek their input.

Until we hear back, we ask our readers to remember that New York City’s greatness is predicated on its diversity. The city government makes occasional, understandable exceptions to accommodate the various religious, ethnic and cultural needs of its residents. Sometimes, a balance needs to be struck between meeting those needs and the needs of the bustling masses at large.

It’s not for us at Sheepshead Bites to say whether this sukkah is too large, or poses a danger to those with disabilities (in fact, I’m more bothered by the garbage against the utility pole, which, if it were not there, would give far more space for passersby). If neighbors are bothered by the structure, we hope they continue to politely press the issue with the congregation, and in the future the congregation look to make adjustments to address those concerns.

Who knows? Sukkot is a holiday in which those who celebrate are encouraged to invite neighbors and friends to their sukkah for food, drink and celebration. Maybe if you politely mention your concerns, you’ll be invited inside for a drink, and then it won’t seem large enough.

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Photo by Lisanne

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