Archive for the tag 'grocery stores'

This is a paid announcement from Forces of Nature, located at 1608 and 1614 Sheepshead Bay Road.

Here at Forces of Nature (1608/1614 Sheepshead Bay Road) we have come to be recognized as Sheepshead Bay’s destination for services and products that help you maintain a healthy lifestyle. We’ve been a part of the community for nearly a decade, supplying neighbors with the best in holistic and nutritious products. Here are just a few of the things we’re known for:

  • providing quality natural and organic products delivered by a knowledgeable, caring staff;
  • providing environmentally-friendly products and actively supporting the preservation of our natural environment;
  • actively seeking out and supporting sources of locally-grown organic foods, recognizing their environmental and health benefits;
  • maintaining a clean, comfortable and attractive store;
  • selling products that reflect the community’s needs and are fairly priced; and
  • providing a source for quality products that customers wish to use for their nutritional goals and lifestyles.

Come support our independently-owned, full-service natural foods and vitamin store, offering a wide selection of natural and gourmet foods, vitamins, herbs, and nutritional supplements, as well as natural body care, and organic and local produce. We also carry many specialty diet items — gluten-free, vegan, and more.

We carefully select only the very highest quality products from the countless available, allowing you to save time, energy and money while knowing you’ve purchased the best. We pride ourselves in offering only 100 percent certified organic produce.

Print this post, or pull it up on your mobile device to receive $10 off your next purchase.

forces-coupon


Forces of Nature
, 1608 and 1614 Sheepshead Bay Road. (718) 616-9000. Follow Forces of Nature on Facebook.

The above is a paid announcement by Forces of Nature. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

seaweed

THE BITE: Today on The Bite, it’s seaweed time!

Seaweed comes in many varieties as it is an umbrella term for all species of ocean plants, and it can be prepared many ways. The one pictured here is Korean kim (or sometimes spelled gim, pronounced with a hard “g”), which is actually a type of red algae. It is harvested in cold waters usually during the winter, and is boiled and dried in big lumpy masses.

This is the same stuff that gets fried up to make Welsh laverbread, or left in big plain sheets as nori to roll Japanese sushi. The type we have here is a Korean side dish where paper-thin sheets are toasted with sesame oil, cut into little rectangles and seasoned with salt. Not only is kim a popular dish in Korea, it is also the last name of about 21 percent of the population there.

Some people, including myself at times, can be averse to seaweed because of its slimy coldness, but this is a whole different textural experience. Gim is super crispy at first bite, sometimes leaving little green flakes behind. If you eat it too slowly, the heat inside your mouth makes it seem to melt on your tongue, which can be counted as a point for or against it, depending on what you’re into.

In the same way that American bars sometimes serve free pretzels or peanuts to keep patrons thirsty, bars in Korea and Japan sometimes serve this kind of seaweed as a salty bar snack. Surprisingly delicious as it is with beer (or soda for the kids), I don’t really see this taking off as a trend at Southern Brooklyn watering holes any time soon, so if you’re interested in trying it, better to buy it at Sea Bay Seafood & Meat Market Inc. (1241 Avenue U, at East 13th Street) where this A+ brand kim comes in a 3-pack for $1.39. Crispy, sesame-flavored, and salty, this is filled with all the goodness I would expect from kim.

If the super saltiness of it gives you pause, know that it also contains a wealth of nutrients, including iodine, iron, amino acids, B vitamins, and protein, so acquiring a taste for it has some perks.

Cheers!

Sea Bay Seafood & Meat Market Inc., 1241 Avenue U at East 13th Street, (718) 382-8889.

– Sonia Rapaport

The Bite is Sheepshead Bites’ weekly column where we explore the foodstuffs of Sheepshead Bay. Each week we check out a different offering from one of the many restaurants, delis, food carts, bakeries, butchers, fish mongers, or grocers in our neighborhood. If it’s edible, we’ll take a bite.

pastry

THE BITE: One recent morning, I walked into Sheepshead Bay Fruit & Vegetables Market, also known as Sheepshead Bay Gourmet Market, and while the newly added fresh meats display did entice me with it’s array of pink-gray veal and tongue, it was, as I’ve mentioned, early in the day. Making a note to come back at a later hour, I continued past to the pastry section to start my day off right with a good dose of sugar.

The pastry case was full of all the regulars: danishes, turnovers, black and white cookies. I apathetically grabbed an almond croissant, which looked more like a frosting covered almond stick. Regardless, I paid my $1.25 for it and was on my way.

Feeling content enough to have kept my breakfast budget low, I unexcitedly bit into my “croissant.” The bits of frosting and crunchy almonds that encrusted it came cascading down my clothes immediately, but the messier the meal, the better, right?

It was pretty fresh-tasting, doughy and a bit buttery, which I hadn’t expected from a plastic-wrapped grocery-bought pastry. And yet another surprise awaited me: somehow the baker had managed to fit two stripes of almond paste into the center of this pastry. I hadn’t particularly planned on mentioning this purchase to anyone, let alone writing about it, but c’mon, marzipan is big news!

Brought up by a European family, anywhere marzipan turns up in American-bought foods, even in an Eastern European store, surprises and delights me. I know there are other brands of almond croissants out there that also feature a marzipan filling, but I’ve often been disappointed either by a lack of filling whatsoever, or by an overly sweet white paste trying to pass for marzipan. Not here. You could see the brown flecks of almond in the filling, indicating actual ground nuts and not just artificially flavored goop.

This was a great way to start the day.

I also should note that the picture only shows about 40 percent of the length of this pastry. That’s right, I ate more than half of it before I regained my wits and took a picture.

Check out our previous review of Sheepshead Bay Gourmet Market’s spinach bourek.

Sheepshead Bay Gourmet Market, 1717 Avenue Z at East 17th Street, (718) 891-8449.

– Sonia Rapaport

The Bite is Sheepshead Bites’ weekly column where we explore the foodstuffs of Sheepshead Bay. Each week we check out a different offering from one of the many restaurants, delis, food carts, bakeries, butchers, fish mongers, or grocers in our neighborhood. If it’s edible, we’ll take a bite.

Cherry Hill Gourmet Market at Lundys in Sheepshead Bay

Photo by Ray Johnson

Cherry Hill Gourmet Market opened its doors to the public for the first time last Tuesday, and you can barely tell floodwaters ever entered its storefront in the historic Lundy’s building (1901 Emmons Avenue).

“We were working night and day, day and night, 24-seven, to get back on our feet,” said owner David Isaev at a grand opening party last week, attended by Assemblymembers Steven Cymbrowitz and Helene Weinstein, Councilman Michael Nelson, and Community Board 15 Chairperson Theresa Scavo.

During the worst of Superstorm Sandy, several feet of water rushed over the Bay’s walls and barreled into the building – ruining the building’s interior, alongside tens of thousands of dollars worth of items and equipment. Cherry Hill provided the video below to Sheepshead Bites, showing the damage after the water receded.

Keep reading and view the video, featuring a cameo with Paul Randazzo or Randazzo’s Clam Bar.

List Of Open Supermarkets


Many readers have been asking about open businesses, especially restaurants, supermarkets and pharmacies. Later today we’ll publish a post about the area’s small businesses hit by the storm, but for now we’re asking for your help compiling a list of open supermarket and grocery stores.

Please put in the comments any supermarkets and grocery stores you know of that are open. Please do not post anything else in the comments here, or it will be deleted.

Photo by Neil Friedman

Aldi Food Market, slated to replace the defunct Pathmark at 3785 Nostrand Avenue next October, will be only half the size of its predecessor, but local pols say that it will still fulfill their promise of bringing in a notable anchor tenant to revitalize the commercial corridor, restore shoppers’ options and revive jobs in the community.

Sheepshead Bites has learned that the former Pathmark location, which occupied 35,000 square feet, is being subdivided into two storefronts, with Aldi filling 18,000 square feet of the property. The second tenant has not yet been signed. Both will have Nostrand Avenue storefronts (as opposed to Pathmark, which had its entrance on the south side of the building), and rooftop parking will remain at the location.

Find out more details about Aldi’s move to the neighborhood, and what local leaders say in response to its smaller size.

Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein, Councilman Lew Fidler and Community Board 15 Chairperson Theresa Scavo joined with representatives of the Lefrak organization and Aldi market today to announce that the German-based grocer has signed on to replace Pathmark at 3785 Nostrand Avenue.

The storefront has sat empty since April 2011 as local elected and the landlord, Lefrak, scrambled to find a supermarket replacement – one of the top constituent demands, the pols said.

“This is a location that has hundreds of thousands of people desperate for a store they could walk to. I know because when I walk around and talk to residents, that’s the only question they want to know,” said Weinstein. “They don’t want to know what’s happening in Albany, they don’t want to know what’s happening in the budget. They just want to know, ‘When can I walk with my cart to go to the store and buy something?’”

Continue Reading »

Photo by Erica Sherman

YOU READ IT HERE FIRST: Neighbors who want a Trader Joe’s to replace Pathmark at 3785 Nostrand Avenue may be happy to learn that Aldi, a low-cost food market owned by Trader Joe’s parent company, will soon serve up fresh produce and other groceries from the currently defunct storefront beginning late next year.

A customer service representative for the international company confirmed to Sheepshead Bites that Aldi is slated to open at 3785 Nostrand Avenue in October 2013.

Aldi, based in Germany, operates more than 1,200 stores in the United States, and is owned by the same parent company as Trader Joe’s. The company has been growing, with plans to add 80 stores this year to its roster of 75 existing operations. They opened their first two New York City locations in 2011 – first in Queens and a second in the Bronx. And, earlier this month, they celebrated the grand opening of a Manhattan location.

Keep reading to find out more about Aldi and the deal at 3785 Nostrand Avenue.

As the closing nears, shelves are emptying.

After 30 years in business, Brighton Beach’s Met Foods supermarket is closing its doors in just two more weeks, leaving neighborhood seniors distressed about future food-shopping endeavors.

The supermarket, located at at 100-120 Brighton Beach Avenue, is being replaced by a modern two-story office and retail complex. Rather than housing a different convenience store, the new complex will be open to a variety of vendors that will be able to sublet office-sized space, with retail on the ground floor.

But Brighton Beach locals are unenthusiastic about the change. Many Met Foods customers are worried about the inconvenience that this close will cause on the elderly population residing in the community.

Continue Reading »

The family of reader Saul Braksmajer in front of his grandfather’s grocery at 144 Neptune Avenue. Photo courtesy of Saul Braksmajer

After we posted a photo for the Morning Mug by reader Saul Braksmajer, he was kind enough to send us in a couple more images, with some local historical significance. Saul’s grandfather ran the grocery store, pictured above, at 144 Neptune Avenue, between Gray Court and East 11thStreet.

Saul tells us:

“The first picture is my grandparents, my dad, and my uncle in front of the store my grandfather ran in 1962. The second picture (Ed. — below) is the same spot, 50 years later (note the giant tree that grew in that time!).”

144 Neptune Avenue today. Photo courtesy of Saul Braksmajer

What I love about the top photo is that you can see that they have advertisements for Green Stamps in the window, as well as products such as White Rose Tea; Schaefer, Schlitz and Rheingold beers, and — something I’ve never heard of — dual filter cigarettes. They also sold giant Lipton mushrooms, which, as I previously mentioned, I’m not much of a fan of.

Does anyone recall shopping at this grocery store? Share your memories in the comments!

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