Archive for the tag 'floyd bennett field'

Map of the coverage area for this NY Rising committee. Source: NY Rising

Map of the coverage area for this NY Rising committee. Source: NY Rising

Neighbors in Mill Basin, Mill Island, Marine Park, Bergen Beach, and Georgetown are invited to a public meeting tonight, Wednesday, November 12, to hear the latest from the state-sponsored NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program and provide input on projects proposed for funding, designed to meet the community’s recovery needs. This program aims to leverage local knowledge and build upon existing efforts and plans to help storm-impacted communities become more resilient through innovative community-driven plans.

When:          Wednesday, November 12 – 7pm-9pm
Where:         Saint Bernard School Auditorium, 2030 East 69th Street, Brooklyn NY 11234
Who:            Southeast Brooklyn Waterfront Planning Committee (including Bergen Beach, Georgetown, Marine Park, Mill Basin, Mill Island), NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program
Contact:       Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery, info@stormrecovery.ny.gov

The NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program is one of several Storm Recovery Initiatives and was established to provide additional rebuilding and revitalization assistance to Communities severely damaged by Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. To facilitate community redevelopment planning and the resilience of Communities, the State has established the NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program. For additional information, check out the website.

You can learn about the specific plans being drawn up for the Southeast Brooklyn area, including the presentation and minutes from past meetings, here.

Ryan Visitor Center

Jamaica Bay remains one of New York City’s most important natural jewels, a network of marsh islands and waterways spanning from Rockaway Inlet and Sheepshead Bay to JFK International Airport.

Tonight, you can get involved and learn more about preservation and restoration efforts at the park during the Jamaica Bay Task Force Meeting at Floyd Bennet Field’s Ryan Visitor Center.

The group is a coalition of community groups, non-profits, city and state agencies and other local stakeholders. More often than not, the group meets in Queens, so a meeting at Floyd Bennett Field is an opportunity for Southern Brooklyn residents to more easily attend.

The group will discuss oyster bed restoration projects, an update on endangered features of its landscape like the marsh islands and the West Pond, marine debris removal and a progress report on the budding Science and Resilience Institute that will one day bolster research and preservation efforts in Jamaica Bay.

The meeting is today at 6:30pm, at the Ryan Visitor Center (50 Aviator Road, off Flatbush Avenue).

The Ryan Center at Floyd Bennett Field

A new institute established to bolster the social and ecological research of Jamaica Bay and the communities around it has won millions of dollars in grant money to make the critical resource more resilient, and are turning to locals for their input.

The Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay (SRIJB) seeks to be the hub for all research about the area, including the environmental, social and economic resilience of the communities that abut it, which includes Sheepshead Bay. The institute will be the center of exchange between scientists, managers, policy makers and community leaders, and is hosted by Brooklyn College.

The organization won $7.7 million for the construction of a new center and a research vessel, and another $3.6 million from the Department of Interior for projects that will help advance understanding of resilience in coastal ecosystems.

With that money on its way, they’re now turning to the public to ensure their research responds to neighbors’ needs. They institute is hosting two focus groups this Thursday following a survey of community organizations it conducted in the spring, hoping to better understand what happened during Sandy and how it affected the communities on its borders.

The focus group will take place at the William Fitts Ryan Visitor Center (50 Aviation Road at Flatbush Avenue), on Thursday, September 4. The first session will be noon to 2pm, and the second at 6pm to 8pm. They will provide a light lunch of dinner.

To sign up, e-mail Bryce DuBoise at bd333@cornell.edu. The cutoff was technically August 27, but DuBoise told Sheepshead Bites that there are still several openings for those interested. Check out the flier for more info.

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More than 300 antique automobiles rumbled over the asphalt of Floyd Bennett Field and took up their positions in front of the appropriately retro Ryan Visitor Center on Sunday, June 8, for the Antique Automobile Association of Brooklyn’s annual spring show.

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Reader Vladimir Korostyshevskiy, who has sent us photos of the event in previous years, was again on hand to capture the event. 

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The annual spring show brings auto collectors from around New York City, New Jersey, Long Island and Connecticut for a “friendship meet,” free to car owners and spectators alike. It’s organized by the group’s president, Leonard Shiller, who owns a fleet of  58 automobiles dating from 1924 to 1968. Most of his cars are kept in a warehouse near his Park Slope home. He recently opened up the warehouse to the public as part of a fundraiser to fight Methodist Hospital’s expansion plans.

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Thanks to Korostyshevskiy for sending over these great photos!

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SkyRocketsLogoA new professional sports team is headed to Brooklyn – and no, we’re not talking about the Islanders.

The semi-pro American Basketball Association has announced the formation of a new team, the Brooklyn SkyRockets, to be based out of the Aviator Sports Center at Floyd Bennett Field. The team will begin playing this November and is currently recruiting players.

Floyd Bennett Field has been without a sports franchise since the Brooklyn Aviators disbanded amid financial crisis in 2012, just three years after it debuted.

If the American Basketball Association sounds familiar to you, it’s because it’s the same name as a a previous league founded in 1967. That league rivaled the NBA and included the New York Nets among its roster, until the NBA and the ABA merged in 1976. The new, semi-pro ABA was founded in 1999 and leases its name from the NBA. Other than that, it has no affiliation with the original ABA.

Here’s the ABA’s press release regarding the SkyRockets’ launch:

The American Basketball Association (ABA) www.abalive.com today announced the Brooklyn SkyRockets will begin play in November. “We are absolutely thrilled to be coming back to Brooklyn,” stated ABA CEO Joe Newman. “We really thought we would have a team there this season, but it just didn’t work out. In Dylan Gioia, we have a great young owner with a terrific background in sports management, economics and marketing. He should have no problem being very successful there.”

An avid basketball fan, Dylan was born and raised in Brooklyn and has degrees in Sports Management and Business Economics from SUNY Cortland. He has worked with the Walt Disney World Resort, cityHUNT Team Building and manages the family business, Key Advertising.

“I will be personally running the Brooklyn Skyrockets,” added Gioia. “The name was chosen to celebrate the rich aviation history of Floyd Bennett Field, where home games will be played. Two ABA programs that are of great interest to us are Fast Break for Reading that helps with children’s literacy – and Proud to Serve America, that honors our veterans, police, firefighters and teachers. We are very excited.”

The ABA also signed a broadcast deal this year, with 40 games airing on ESPN3 beginning in September.

The team is currently recruiting with events around Brooklyn through June and July. For details on how to tryout, check out the Brooklyn Game’s write-up.

The team has already signed free agent players Keenan Belle, Deylon Bovell, and Cyrano Providence. All three are accomplished players scouted from community college teams, including Providence, who played for Kingsborough Community College.

Aerial shot of Floyd Bennett Field. Source: Wikipedia

Aerial shot of Floyd Bennett Field. Source: Wikipedia

Join American Littoral Society naturalist Mickey Maxwell Cohen and discover birds, early wildflowers and hidden World War II military bunkers in the developing maritime woodlands of Floyd Bennett Field, Sunday, April 20 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Meet at the Ryan Visitor Center. There will be at least two miles of walking, so prepare for moderate exertion. Reservations are not required and anyone is able to attend.

To learn more, call (718) 318- 4340.

A Douglas A-4B Skyhawk Attack Jet inside of Hangar B. Source: Gateway National Park

A Douglas A-4B Skyhawk Attack Jet inside of Hangar B. Source: Gateway National Park

Children on spring break are invited to attend “Flights of Discovery,” this Wednesday, April 16 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Floyd Bennett Field’s Ryan Visitor Center, where they can learn about airports and planes of the past.

Kids can design their own pilot wings and receive a passport to adventure. Then, visit Hanger B where Floyd Bennett’s Historic Aircraft Restoration Project (HARP) volunteers are restoring vintage planes.

Anyone can come and reservations are not required.

To learn more, call (718) 354-4606 or check out Gateway National Park on the web.

A Ranger educates the public at the Ryan Visitor Center. Photo by Ned Berke

A Ranger educates the public at the Ryan Visitor Center. Photo by Ned Berke

Two exciting, historical presentations will be taking place this Sunday, December 15 at Floyd Bennett Field’s Ryan Visitor Center.

  • Famous First Flights: Jamaica Bay has had its fair share of famous first flights taking off and landing from its shores. Join a park ranger from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. for a slideshow about these flights, and many others.
  • Civil War or Civil Rights – A Century of Change: Explore the major events of the civil rights continuum during the pivotal years from 1863 to 1963, from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Anyone can come to both events — reservations are not required. To get there by public transportation, take the Q35 bus [PDF].

For more information, call (718) 354-4606.

Source: Williams

The controversial natural gas pipeline, proposed to run underneath the Rockaways, through Jamaica Bay, and into Floyd Bennett Field National Park, has been plodding along the approval process for several months, with the latest news being the issuance of an apparently favorable draft statement by the federal government.

(Read our ongoing coverage of the Jamaica Bay pipeline.)

The Rockaway Wave reported last week on the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Rockaway Delivery Lateral Project, an offshoot of Williams’ Transcontinental Gas Pipeline (Transco):

In its draft EIS, [the Federal Energy Regulatory Committee (FERC)] gave a favorable report for Transco and came to a conclusion that the environmental impact wouldn’t be so bad. The “construction and operation of the Projects would result in limited adverse environmental impacts that would mostly occur during construction,” the EIS said. Overall it says that the limited adverse impacts “would be reduced to less-than-significant levels with the implementation of Transco’s proposed mitigation and the additional measures recommended in the draft EIS.”

Critics, though, remain unswayed, saying that the agency has been too lenient in its review of the research, which was provided by Williams, and say more information should be required:

While Williams is pleased with the report, environmentalists are not satisfied. Dan Mundy, president of the Jamaica Bay Ecowatchers says the “report downplays the significance of the environmental impacts.” Mundy explained concerns over the fact that Transco hasn’t stated exactly what fluids will be involved with the project, which is significant as they will likely wind up in the water and may affect marine life. He also says that the company hasn’t released a modeling report which would show where sediments would go when the company trenches the ocean to install the pipeline. Mundy explains that sediment could impact an important artificial reef off the coast of Rockaway. Transco has been asked to release the sediment report for several months.

“The EIS report, as it’s done right now, is downplaying that significant impact and we’re concerned by that,” Mundy said. “It doesn’t include critical data.” He went on to say that the project should be put on hold. If it does go through and causes the mentioned environmental impacts, Mundy hopes the company considers restoring the areas that are impacted.

FERC didn’t give it all a free pass, though. The agency is recommending additional mitigation measures to reduce impacts on wildlife, habitat, and the historic character of the Floyd Bennett Field hangars that will be used in the project. The agency is proposing the requirement of 27 site-specific mitigation measures if the project goes forward.

The draft report can be found on the FERC website.

The agency is holding two public hearings to hear concerns about the project. The first will be held Tuesday, October 22, at 7:00 p.m. at the Knights of Columbus Rockaway Council 267 (333 Beach 90th Street, Rockaway Beach). The second will be held Wednesday, October 23, at 7:00 p.m. at Aviator Sports & Events Center in Floyd Bennett Field (3159 Flatbush Avenue).

Additionally, comments can be made electronically through the eComment or eFiling features of the website under “Documents and Filings.” When writing a comment, refer to docket number CP13-36-000 for the Rockaway Project. Written comments can also be sent to Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Room 1A, Washington, DC 20426.

Photo by Ned Berke

Photo by Ned Berke

Sorry for the short notice, but if you’re looking for a fun and educational activity for your four- or five-year-old this afternoon, head on over to the Golden Age Discovery Room in the recently restored Ryan Visitor Center at Floyd Bennett Field from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Home to New York City’s first municipal airport, children can learn all about airplanes during a fun story teaching session. The event is free — anyone can come — and reservations are not required. To get there by public transportation, take the Q35 bus [PDF].

For more information, call (718) 354-4606.

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