Archive for the tag 'candidates night'

The Staten Island Ferry. Photo by Erica Sherman

The Staten Island Ferry. Photo by Erica Sherman

THE COMMUTE: This past week, transit news focused on what seemed like a series of unrelated events — most notably the resumption of Rockaway “A” Train service.

“A” Train Service Returns

“A” train service, between Howard Beach and the Rockaways, which was suspended seven months ago due to Superstorm Sandy, finally resumed on May 30. Due to the destruction of the trestle near Broad Channel, the suspension forced residents to resort to unreliable and overcrowded bus service. Months ago, a fleet of R-32 cars were trucked to Rockaway to at least provide subway shuttle service within Rockaway but it was in no way adequate to meet residents’ needs. If you think transit service is poor in Sheepshead Bay, you should be aware of the two-hour plus commutes and hour waits for buses, which Rockaway residents were forced to endure, with the trestle out of service.

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Republican State Senate contender David Storobin told attendees of a civic meeting this week that he supports implementing term limits for members of the state legislature, and explained that his proposal to give tuition vouchers for private school students would be funded by “existing revenue streams.”

Storobin appeared before the Manhattan Beach Community Group on Wednesday, February 29, as part of the civic’s Candidate’s Night – although his Democratic opponent was forced to cancel for health reasons. Storobin took questions for about 40 minutes, touching on issues including his thoughts on job creation, reducing regulations and fees affecting businesses, and his support for charter schools.

The Republican candidate didn’t elaborate more on what he meant by funding tuition vouchers with existing revenue streams, though he did say that the tuition vouchers would match per-child spending in public schools, and hinted that – if parents remove their children from the public school – the funding would come out of city and state education spending.

“Every child at this point gets a certain amount of money – which is about $18,000 … When it comes to that money, the parents would get it and they would be able to have a choice of what to do with that,” he said. “If they want the student to go to public school, they would get the same exact budget they got before.”

Many residents were appalled when State Senator Carl Kruger’s former challenger in the Democratic Primary dropped out. They were even angrier when he turned around and endorsed Kruger.

It looked like voters would be denied a choice.

And then Avrahom Rosenberg stepped into the ring, running on the Conservative Party ticket. The young, first-time candidate has the backing of Ed Koch’s New York Uprising, a campaign to kick out the worst of the state legislators.

Rosenberg made his first appearance in Sheepshead Bay yesterday, during the Sheepshead Bay / Plumb Beach Civic Association meeting’s Candidate Night. Of all the politicians in the room, he was the only challenger present and spoke for the shortest amount of time – about three minutes. He spoke little about Kruger, instead depicting his run as an attempt to inspire more youths to be involved in politics. A glimpse of his political leanings came out when he briefly discussed the new healthcare bill and what he thought were unfair costs to be passed along to his generation. Rosenberg is from Midwood.

In a rare civic association appearance, the senator himself showed up. He spoke before Rosenberg and left immediately afterwards (In the video above, we chose to reverse the order in which they appeared). He never mentioned the elections, instead touting his flu shot program and launching into a 10-minute question-and-answer session.

Kruger discussed the KamaSutra sex shop, saying that city agencies would make sure they comply with local laws, and that resident’s efforts were best spent convincing friends and family not to visit. He also decried the MTA for cuts in bus service to the area. Regarding the Voorhies Avenue mosque, he said the government was constrained in the actions it could take because of laws protecting houses of worship. But he noted that the DOB, DEP and other agencies would ensure it is built and operated according to code.