Archive for the tag 'bullying'

Above is the fourth of four videos, in which NYPD Community Affairs officers give tips to the community. In this video, officers give several crime prevention tips, including a rundown of several programs offered at all local precincts to help you protect your property.

The videos come from a recent event in which NYPD officers from the 60th Precinct, 61st Precinct, 62nd Precinct, 70th Precinct and Brooklyn South’s Community Affairs Unit converged on Tzar Restaurant (2007 Emmons Avenue), for the first ever Community Awareness Meeting organized by the Be Proud Foundation and the Brighton Beach Business Improvement District.

Click here to see their video on bullying.
Click here to see their video on preventing cell phone theft.
Click here to see their video on identifying drug use among kids.

Last week we brought you the first two NYPD Community Affairs Unit’s safety tips videos. This is the third of four, in which the officers talk about drug use among children and teens, and how parents and educators can spot bad habits.

The videos come from a recent event in which NYPD officers from the 60th Precinct, 61st Precinct, 62nd Precinct, 70th Precinct and Brooklyn South’s Community Affairs Unit converged on Tzar Restaurant (2007 Emmons Avenue), for the first ever Community Awareness Meeting organized by the Be Proud Foundation and the Brighton Beach Business Improvement District.

Click here to see their video on bullying.
Click here to see their video on preventing cell phone theft. 

Yesterday we brought you a video of NYPD Community Affairs officers providing tips to prevent cell phone theft. Today we have a video for parents on how to identify and prevent bullying, regardless of whether their child is the bullied or the bully.

The videos come from an event last Thursday in which NYPD officers from the 60th Precinct, 61st Precinct, 62nd Precinct, 70th Precinct and Brooklyn South’s Community Affairs Unit converged on Tzar Restaurant (2007 Emmons Avenue), for the first ever Community Awareness Meeting organized by the Be Proud Foundation and the Brighton Beach Business Improvement District.

Bullying and showing respect for all students will be on the agenda of Community Education Council 21’s next public meeting from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m., March 21, at Public School 209 – The Margaret Mead School, 2609 East Seventh Street between Avenue Z and Manor Court, just off Coney Island Avenue.

Sara Carvajal, executive director of Strategic Leadership, will deliver the Superintendent’s Report, followed by a number of guest speakers including Frank Laghezza of the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office, who will discuss bullying, and Brooklyn Cyclones Marketing & Promotions Manager Dan Pecoraro, who will share some of the anti-bullying initiatives made by the Brooklyn Cyclones organization.

Additionally, City Councilman Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. will present certificates to the winners of the “Respect for All” student essay contest.

Other items on the meeting’s agenda will be the council president’s report, discussion on turnaround schools, Parent Association Quarterlies delivered by Presidents Council President Heather Fiorica, as well as a round-up of important dates and activities.

Members of the community are invited to attend, as there will also be a public speaking time. There will be door prizes and light refreshments.

To learn more about CEC 21, call (718) 333-3885, email cec21@schools.nyc.gov, go to www.cecd21.org, or find them on Facebook.

Source: saveteenrapp.org

A program that helps 11,800 teens each year might be terminated by July of this year if funding is allowed to be slashed, and a local councilman says he’ll be fighting for its restoration.

Teen RAPP — Relationship Abuse Prevention Program — has been running in 62 host schools throughout New York City. The program provides preventative measures for teens facing bullying and dating or domestic violence, using  prevention classes, intervention counseling, staff development and training and community outreach.

But, in cutting all of its $3 million in funding, Mayor Bloomberg’s new budget gives the axe to a program that advocates believe is proven to be effective.

“We see a direct correlation between RAPP and reducing abuse in schools,” said Caitlyn Brazill, a representative for the CAMBA, a nonprofit that helped create and oversee the program. “Cutting RAPP could lead to an increase of abuse in schools.”

It’s not the first time the program has faced budget cuts. Just last year the program was slashed, but managed to regain its funding after a fierce struggle pitting education and political advocates against the mayor’s office.

But the latest loss of funding could mean a decrease in peer mentors, according to CAMBA, which would mute the program’s success at a time in which bullying appears to otherwise be on the rise.

City Councilman Lew Fidler, who serves as chair of the Youth Services committee and has been a vocal advocate for anti-bullying measures, is blasting the proposed cuts, pointing out that early prevention is key in abuse and domestic violence cases.

“I’ve fought repeatedly to protect our City’s children and most vulnerable citizens,” said Fidler. “This is part of that fight. The school-based teen RAPP program, through counseling and support, teaches needed skills and promotes healthy relationships.”

 

The meek, the relentlessly picked on, and the emotionally tormented are breathing a sigh of relief as bullies will now have lesser recourse for abusing their victims, both online, and on school grounds, thanks to comprehensive anti-bullying legislation passed by the New York State Senate and City Council.

Cyber-bullying legislation sponsored by Lew Fidler was signed into law this week by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, while, up in Albany, State Senator Marty Golden managed to push a bill through the State Senate. Both bills target bullying – online and off – through schools.

Keep reading about the legislation and how it protects children.

Lewis A. Fidler

Source: council.nyc.gov

I read this and thought, “Where was Lew Fidler when I was growing up?”

Since the widely publicized suicide last year of Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi shocked the nation, after his private homosexual tryst was publically broadcast by his tormentors over Twitter, the councilman is urgently trying push through a bill he introduced this week that would make anti-bullying programs mandatory in New York City schools.

During a Committee on Civil Rights hearing earlier this week, members agreed that, while city children are being bullied every day, “Gay, lesbian and immigrant kids are most at risk of being pushed around in city schools,” noting that cyberbullying is yet another channel for the bullies to use to make the lives of their victims more intolerable.

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