Archive for the tag 'brighton beach'

Neptune Avenue and West 6th Street, the scene of the accident. (Source: Google Maps)

Neptune Avenue and West 6th Street, the scene of the accident. (Source: Google Maps)

A 55-year-old man is dead after being struck by an Access-A-Ride van on Neptune Avenue on Sunday.

The man, who has yet to be identified by police, was crossing Neptune Avenue at West 6th Street on Sunday at 5:44pm when the van heading eastbound on Neptune hit him.

EMS transported the pedestrian to Lutheran Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

The driver, a 30-year-old man, stayed on the scene. The investigation is ongoing, but police told reporters that no charges are expected.

Parking lot identified in BP Adams' affordable housing report.

Parking lot identified in BP Adams’ affordable housing report.

Several “underdeveloped areas” of Brooklyn can be used to build affordable housing – including municipal parking lots in Brighton Beach, Bensonhurst, and Midwood – according to a new report by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams.

The parking lots, like one facing the Riegelmann Boardwalk between Brighton 2nd Street and Brighton 4th Street, can be sold to create approximately 2,000 affordable housing units, with space leftover for shared public parking, states the report.

While praising Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 10-year plan to build 200,000 units of affordable housing citywide, Adams writes:

New York City, in general, and Brooklyn, in particular, can be models for government at its best: expanding opportunity and safeguarding community character, while being supportive, resilient and progressive. Brooklyn has the space to create entirely new neighborhoods by tapping underdeveloped land, exploring air rights and considering developing residential properties over existing rail yards and rail infrastructure. We have the capacity; all we need is tenacity!

Along with identifying sites to build the units, the report offers several ways to better connect New Yorkers with affordable housing, including partnering with the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) to create multiple tiers of income eligibility, so that a wider portion of the population can have access. Adams also proposes the HPD give preference to locals, so that residents are not forced from their neighborhoods.

The report is restating a conversation from eight years ago, and it still needs to evolve, a spokesperson for the borough president told us. When fully fleshed out, the plan will include components like doing construction in phases to ensure parking for merchants at all times, as well as building height and affordability considerations.

This is not the beep’s first bold affordable housing proposal. As we previously reported, one of the first things Adams did as borough president was explore the possibility of selling air rights in one part of the borough and using the money to to create land banks near Coney Island for affordable housing.

Read the full report here.

Source: Flickr/rene-germany

Source: Flickr/rene-germany

Thirty percent of Brooklyn households lack high-speed internet at home, keeping residents from accessing crucial resources for school, work and business, with Kensington and Borough Park being the areas in Brooklyn most lacking when it comes to the digital divide, according to a new report from city Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer’s report, “Internet Inequality: Broadband Access in NYC,” states that citywide, 27 percent of New York City households (meaning 730,000 homes) lack broadband internet, with 17 percent of households (533,000 homes) not having a computer at their residence. Bronx had the worst access compared to the rest of the city, with 34 percent of households lacking high-speed internet access, compared to 30 percent in Brooklyn, 26 percent in Queens, 22 percent in Staten Island, and 21 percent in Manhattan.

“New Yorkers who don’t have online access lack the tools they need to improve their education, employment and business opportunities,” Stringer said in a press release. “Just as the subway powered New York’s growth in the 20th century, high-speed broadband will power our City’s economic competitiveness in the 21st century.  If we are to remain the global city, we can’t allow our peers to speed by while New Yorkers are left on the shoulder of the information superhighway. Slow and steady does not win this race.”

Using data from the Census Bureau’s 2013 American Community Survey of households on broadband subscriptions and computer ownership, Stringer found that Kensington and Borough Park had the greatest number of homes, 47 percent, without high-speed internet access. Brighton Beach and Coney Island, had the second highest at 42 percent, and Brownsville and Ocean Hill had 40 percent.

As for the rest of Brooklyn, the percent of households without broadband connection at home are as follows:

  • Bedford-Stuyvesant – 38.7 percent
  • Crown Heights North and Prospect Heights – 34 percent
  • Bushwick – 33.4 percent
  • East New York & Starrett City – 32 percent
  • Flatbush & Midwood – 31.6 percent
  • Greenpoint & Williamsburg – 29.6 percent
  • East Flatbush – 29 percent
  • Crown Heights South & Prospect Lefferts – 26.9 percent
  • Sheepshead Bay & Gerritsen Beach – 25.3 percent
  • Bensonhurst & Bath Beach – 24.9 percent
  • Sunset Park & Windsor Terrace – 23.1 percent
  • Bay Ridge & Dyker Heights – 21.5 percent
  • Canarsie & Flatlands – 21 percent
  • Brooklyn Heights & Fort Greene – 17 percent
  • Park Slope, Carroll Gardens & Red Hook – 14.7 percent

Other findings included that individuals with a bachelor’s degree or more had far greater access to high-speed internet, with just 11 percent of college graduates lacking broadband access compared to 40 percent of individuals with less than a high school education.

The comptroller also noted that 27 and 26 percent of black and Hispanic households, respectively, lack broadband at home, compared to 21 percent of white households and 15 percent of Asian households. Younger people also appear to have greater access, with 21 percent of New York City youth (0-18 years) lacking broadband at home, compared to 45 percent of individuals over the age of 65.

Much of the lack of access stems from financial reasons, according to the report, with the Comptroller noting in a press release that consumers in cities across the country and around the world—from Seoul and Paris to Kansas City and Chattanooga—can spend less than $70 per month for a one gigabit connection, but the top speed available for most consumers in New York City is half the speed of those cities (500 megabits), at a cost of more than four times that ($299.99 a month).

Stringer’s report was released just before the Franchise & Concession Review Committee held a hearing on Monday on Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to convert pay phones across the five boroughs into free Wi-Fi kiosks. While a number of civic and tech leaders have thrown their support behind the plan, others, including Stringer and the city’s borough presidents, previously criticized the proposal, saying they were concerned it would unequally provide high-speed Wi-Fi, with more attention being paid to Manhattan than Brooklyn or Queens – as well as allocating very few resources to the Bronx.

It does, however, appear that some of these concerns have been addressed in the interim between a Daily News report that said the mayor’s plan would shortchange poorer neighborhoods and yesterday’s hearing. The Gotham Gazette reported that, “a representative from Stringer’s office read a statement from the comptroller at the hearing which mentioned—without going into specifics—some ‘flagged issues,’ but including that his office was ‘working with City Hall to resolve’ them. He did not recommend voting against the contract.”

The Franchise & Concession Review Committee will meet tomorrow, December 10, to vote on the Wi-Fi plan.

Photo by Ned Berke

Photo by Ned Berke

by Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz

Back in 2008, my Assembly colleague, Alec Brook-Krasny, and I were able to secure $10 million in capital funding for the repair of the Riegelmann Boardwalk. The purpose of this money was to give the Boardwalk the rehabilitation it deserves and ensure that generations of New Yorkers will have the opportunity to enjoy this iconic wooden structure.

One thing this money was not supposed to do was destroy the Boardwalk as we know it. That’s why I’m outraged by the city’s decision to rebuild the Boardwalk out of concrete and plastic, effectively turning our Boardwalk into a sidewalk. To repurpose the money and change the scope of the project is an underhanded misuse of funds by this administration, and it’s something I won’t tolerate.

Since the start of this new Mayoral administration I have attempted to open a dialogue and stress the need to rebuild the Boardwalk out of wood. Unfortunately, the city has chosen instead to fast-track the destruction of our iconic landmark and has been unwilling to listen to the people of our communities. We’re the ones who have a vested interest in the Boardwalk. We’re the people who know how badly the concrete sections were damaged during Sandy. Clearly this is not a material that promises flood resiliency.

The contract for the funds I allocated is set to expire on December 31, 2014. The city is hoping to extend this contract but I have other ideas. I am committed to doing everything in my power to block the extension of the contract and rescind the money that was allocated.

Thank you for your letters, emails, tweets and calls. My confidence is strengthened with the knowledge that I have the support of my community and activists like you.

Please remember that I’m here to help you with any issue or problem and I’d like to hear your thoughts and ideas. My district office is located at 1800 Sheepshead Bay Road and we’re open Monday through Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Fridays until 5 p.m. Feel free to call me at (718) 743-4078 or email cymbros@assembly.state.ny.us.

Steven Cymbrowitz is the 45th District’s representative to the State Assembly, representing the Sheepshead Bay, Brighton Beach, Manhattan Beach and Gravesend.

1070 Ocean View Avenue (Source: Google Maps)

1070 Ocean View Avenue (Source: Google Maps)

Responding to a 911 call, police arrived to a gruesome scene early this morning: a 59-year-old man was stabbed to death in his apartment on Ocean View Avenue; outside the building, the crumpled body of his 30-year-old stepson was splayed on the pavement with severe trauma; and just a few blocks away, the pregnant sister of the younger man, a 29-year-old woman, was found bleeding from stab wounds to her back, wrist and forehead.

The female victim phoned 911 at approximately 2:30am. The 59-year-old, Voclodymyr Yeushchenko, was pronounced dead by EMS inside his 1070 Ocean View Avenue apartment building, just across the street from elementary school PS 225.

The 30-year-old, Kostyantyn Proskurnyak, who lived in the same apartment, was rushed off to Coney Island Hospital, where he too was pronounced dead.

His sister, the 29-year-old, was picked up by first responders at Brighton Beach Avenue and Coney Island Avenue . She was taken to Lutheran Medical Center, where she is listed in stable condition.

The investigation is ongoing, but cops told the Daily News that they believe Proskurnyak got into a heated argument with his stepfather, Yeushchenko. It escalated until he drew a knife and stabbed him in the neck. Proskurnyak’s sister tried to intervene when she was stabbed in the head, back and wrist.

The sister darted out of the apartment to safety, where she phoned cops, according to the News. The New York Post adds that the woman is pregnant.

As Yeushchenko bled to death, cops believe Proskurnyak went to an upper floor or the roof, where he took his life in a suicidal leap.

The investigation is ongoing, according to police.

Leonid Fridman (Source: Handout via DailyNews.com)

Leonid Fridman (Source: Handout via DailyNews.com)

The boss of a Brighton Beach-based construction firm was convicted of ripping off his own workers, failing to pay them required wages on a job at JFK Airport, and will now have to dole out $200,000 in backpay as part of his sentence.

Leonid Fridman, 60, owns Millenium Commercial Corporation, located at 200 Brighton 15th Street. The company was hired as a subcontractor for tile restoration in the renovation of the TWA Flight Center at John F. Kennedy Airport in 2009 and 2010, where he was required to pay employees prevailing wages on the taxpayer funded project – $50 per hour for laborers and $70 for tile setters. Instead, he doled out as little as $10 per hour, according to Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

To hide the deceit, Fridman made phony documents, including payroll reports and fake paychecks.

“Mr. Fridman is being held accountable for stealing wages from workers who renovated parts of JFK,” said Schneiderman in a statement. “My office will continue to take strong action, including filing criminal charges, against employers who violate New York’s labor laws, steal taxpayer dollars and violate the public trust.”

Fridman pleaded guilty to grand larceny in the second degree, and agreed to pay $200,000 in restitution. He’s also banned from working on public works projects for five years, and is sentenced to five years of probation.

 

gorelik

Keep an eye out for neighbor Natan “Nate” Gorelik, a 28-year-old graphic designer last seen in Brighton Beach.

Gorelik left his grandmother’s home Tuesday in Brighton Beach Tuesday evening, wearing black rolled up pants. Friends and family have reached out to Sheepshead Bites about his disappearance, and are posting fliers around the neighborhood.

Police have been notified and are assisting in the search. On Thursday, some of Gorelik’s belongings were found on Plumb Beach, including his wallet, a phone, book bag, guitar, shoes and jacket.

If you have information about Gorelik’s whereabouts, or have seen him since Tuesday night, please call 911.

This is a paid announcement from American Fine Craft Show:

crafts

Two weeks from now, the American Fine Craft Show will hit the Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern Parkway between Washington and Underhill Avenues) for the second year–and with it, handmade pieces from 90 US artists, including talented neighbors from Brighton Beach and beyond.

From 12-6pm on Saturday, November 22 and 11am-6pm on Sunday, November 23, attendees will be able to browse an enormous range of stunning jewelry, clothing and other fiber arts, furniture, sculpture, ceramics, and more in the museum’s two-level Beaux-Arts Court. There’s also an exclusive Brooklyn Museum members’ preview from 11am-12pm on Saturday for those who can’t wait to see the beautiful crafts available.

In addition to a selection of carefully curated items including glass vessels from neighbor Nick Leonoff and fiber art from Jean Lugrin Ferlish, archguitar player Peter Blanchette will provide a live score for the event.

Tickets for Saturday’s preview hour, regular admission for students, and regular admission for Brooklyn Museum members is $6; regular admission for adults is $12 (discounted to $10 if purchased before November 15); regular admission for seniors is $11, and kids under 10 get in free. While student and senior tickets are only available for purchase with cash and a valid ID at the show’s door, you have the option of reserving standard adult tickets ahead of time here. Tickets also include admission to the rest of the museum.

Images via the American Fine Craft Show

Suspect-Ravshan-Saibnazarova]

Police arrested a man Saturday night who they say stabbed his estranged wife multiple times in Brighton Beach.

Ravshan Saibnazarov, 30, approached his 22-year-old victim from behind as she walked to the subway station on Brighton Beach Avenue near Brighton 6th Street on Friday, November 7 at around 2pm and stabbed her, cops said.

The woman, who had a restraining order against her husband, stumbled into a nearby Starbucks (607 Brighton Beach Avenue) and was taken to Lutheran Hospital, where she she was treated for several neck wounds. She remains in stable condition.

Saibnazarov was charged with assault in the first degree. He has past arrests related to domestic violence, according to reports.

Brighton 5th Court and Brighton 6th Street (Source: Google Maps)

Brighton 5th Court and Brighton 6th Street (Source: Google Maps)

A brawl between students from rival high schools sparked yesterday’s shooting that hospitalized a mom on her way to pick up her son from a nearby elementary school, sources say.

A source briefed by police on the violent outburst said that the fight broke out on Brighton 6th Street between students from nearby Lincoln High School and Grady High School. One of the students opened fire, with the stray bullet striking Safia Bibi, 34, at 2:21pm, as she made her way to pick up her two sons from P.S. 253 (601 Oceanview Avenue), just a block away.

Police confirmed to Sheepshead Bites that two groups were involved in a dispute. The victim heard a shot and felt pain in her arm. No arrests have been made and the investigation is ongoing, but the police declined to provide additional information or confirm that students from the high schools were involved..

The victim’s family told NBC New York that fights between the high school students are common.

“She’s scared, everyday scared to get the kids, it’s crazy,” Bibi’s Niece, Kainat Yasin, told the news outlet.

Bibi said the fighting teens Wednesday afternoon filled the block and she couldn’t get around them. Then three shots rang out, one of which hit her. She was treated at a nearby hospital and released with her arm in a sling Wednesday night.

“This is dangerous,” said Yasin. “If there from Grady how come the school doesn’t know they have a gun?”

No other injuries resulted from the shooting.

News reports describe the suspect as a black male, approximately 18 years old, wearing grey sweatpants and with dreadlocks.

“I am appalled by this tragic incident where an innocent bystander was shot in the arm.  I am in contact with the NYPD and I am confident that they will apprehend those responsible,” Councilman Chaim Deutsch said yesterday evening. “My prayers are with the victim and I wish her a full and speedy recovery. “

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