Archive for the tag 'ave z'

brass-rail

The Log Cabin, one of Sheepshead Bay’s oldest bars, has slashed its storefront in half and is now going by the name The Brass Rail.

Established in 1987, the local staple at 2123 Avenue Z took up two storefronts on the corner of East 22nd Street for decades. But the owners reduced its footprint some time after Superstorm Sandy. That part, 2121 Avenue Z, is now leased by dentist Paul Markel.

The bar launched several new beer options on tap as well after years of being known to locals as the place with “several taps, all Bud.” They’ve also been doing a lot of themed events, including a pajama party, 80s party and, as seen in the photo above, a Thanksgiving Eve Party coming up in two weeks. Unfortunately, it was also one of the last bars in Sheepshead Bay with a pool table – and that is now, sadly, gone. The karaoke will go on, however, as indicated by the new line on their awning: “The Karaoke Spot”.

Best of luck to the new Brass Rail, as well as to Dr. Merkel!

cih-rendering

Rendering of proposed building, as seen from Avenue Z and East 6th Street. Designs have not yet been finalized.

Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) is slated to construct a new, resilient building to house critical services, ensuring that Southern Brooklyn’s only major medical center will continue without significant service interruptions in the case of another weather event like Superstorm Sandy

The new building, as well as a planned 1,720-foot flood wall, is being funded using part of a $923 million grant from FEMA, representing the lion’s share from a slated $1.6 billion payout Health and Hospital Corporation (HHC) announced last week.

“Few services are as critical as our hospitals during extreme weather. This unprecedented investment will make four key public hospitals much more resilient next time they need to be,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio at a press conference at Coney Island Hospital on Thursday.

The new building will be constructed in a section of the hospital campus’ parking lot near Avenue Z. It will be elevated by pillars 10- to 15-feet high, allowing water to pass beneath in the event of a future flood.

When it’s completed, the new building will be the largest investment and expansion of the hospital in more than a decade.

The hospital’s critical services – many of which were off-line for months after Superstorm Sandy – will all be housed in the new, flood-proof structure. A ramp will bring ambulances to a second-floor Emergency Room, and the medical center’s most used services – X-ray, CAT scan, MRI, pharmacy and lab departments – will all be in the same building.

“This is a big deal for the community. They should be excited about it,” said Coney Island Hospital’s Associate Executive Director for Public Affairs Robert Cooper. “This is going to shore it up and guarantee that there won’t be any disruption in their healthcare in another storm like Sandy.”

When it’s completed some four to five years from now, it’ll be the largest investment and expansion of the hospital since the completion of the  inpatient bed tower building in 2006.

The parts of the campus not currently storm-proofed, which include the tower building and the main building, which houses the emergency department, will be wrapped in a 1,720-foot flood wall, designed to protect from a storm surge on the scale of that predicted to occur only once every 500 years.

Exact specifications of the new building are not yet known. Although the hospital worked with HHC, FEMA and consultants on the proposal and have created a rendering, seen at the top of this post, the actual designs have not been finalized. The project will go out to bid shortly after funding comes through the federal pipeline.

In addition to the new building, a portion of the $923 million is being used to reimburse the hospital for repairs already made to the facility’s basements, first floor and electrical systems.

Despite being more than a quarter-mile away from the waterfront, the hospital suffered severe flooding during Superstorm Sandy, devastating its basement and first floor. The hospital was evacuated after the storm and its emergency department was shuttered until February 2013. It did not see all services restored until later in the spring, and its temporary closure caused overflows at other hospitals that stretched resources thin.

Video tour of damage after Sandy, filmed in November 2012:

Some improvements have already been made to make the campus more resilient, including the elevation of electrical systems and the acquisition of temporary flood barrier systems that can be deployed before another storm.

Coney Island Hospital is the only major public hospital in Southern Brooklyn, and the only HHC facility in Brooklyn damaged during Sandy. Officials also announced on Thursday that Bellevue Hospital will receive $376 million, Metropolitan Hospital will receive $120 million, and Roosevelt Island’s Coler Specialty Hospital will receive $181 million as part of the same grant through FEMA’s 428 program for resiliency.

Local pols are praising the investment in resiliency for local healthcare services.

“We must do all that we can to minimize future impacts to public health facilities like this vital Southern Brooklyn institution that serves thousands of people,” said Councilman Mark Treyger via press release. ” We can’t afford having Coney Island Hospital and others lose power and shut down emergency room access, when so many in our vulnerable residents rely on our public hospitals.”

“In the crucial months following Hurricane Sandy, residents were transported and referred to nearby hospitals. In a medical emergency, seconds can mean the difference between life and death,” said Councilman Chaim Deutsch in a statement.

Source: mikey k/flickr

Source: mikey k/flickr

Cops believe the same man is behind a handful of incidents in Sheepshead Bay in which the suspect posed as a police officer, flashed a gun and demanded property before running off.

The suspect is described as a black male, approximately 35 years old, 5’7″ tall and approximately 160 lbs, and is believed to have struck at least three times in five days.

The first incident occurred on October 1 at Brown Street near Avenue Z. The suspect went up to a delivery man at approximately 7:10pm, pushed a silver gun to his chest and said, “I’m the police, give me your ID,” according to police. The suspect then took his wallet, which contained cash, and fled on foot.

Two days later, on October 3 at approximately 6:45pm, the victim was waiting for an elevator inside the lobby of a building at Avenue V and Batchelder Street. The suspect entered and flashed a gun, saying “Stop, police, you’re selling drugs. Let me see your driver’s license and ID.” The phony cop took the ID and fled on foot.

Then, on October 5, at approximately 12:30pm, the suspect walked into a Rite Aid at Kings Highway and East 18th Street where his ruse got more elaborate. He told an employee that two men would enter the store and remove merchandise, and then he, a cop, would arrest them outside. The worker wasn’t fooled and asked for identification. The suspect fled.

No one was hurt in any of the incidents.

Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477).  The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

Rendina (Source: Facebook)

Rendina (Source: Facebook)

A woman is in critical condition after being struck by a hit-and-run driver while she was attempting to save her dog, which was struck moments earlier by another hit-and-run driver.

Kristin Rendina, 31, was hospitalized after the Friday night incident at West 2nd Street and Avenue Z. The dog, a miniature pinscher named Pasquolino, died at the scene.

The dog was hit first by a vehicle heading south on West 2nd Street. Rendina came into the street and was kneeling by the dog when a car raced down Avenue Z and struck her without stopping.

The vehicle that hit the woman was a black Jeep Wrangler. Neither driver has been apprehended.

“They have her sedated for the weekend,” Rendina’s mother told the Daily News. “She has massive chest injuries and her lung collapsed. The doctor couldn’t tell me more than that.”

Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477).  The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

armed-robbery

Cops are hunting a man that they believe is responsible for four muggings at gunpoint in Sheepshead Bay, Gravesend, Gerritsen Beach and Mill Basin.

Police say their man is a black male in his mid-20s, between 6’0″ to 6’2″, with a light complexion and last seen wearing rectangular eyeglasses. He was slightly unshaven, and may drive or have a co-conspirator who drives a white Acura TL.

The four robberies police believe him responsible for are:

  • On September 6, at 3:45pm, the 67-year-old  male victim was parking his car in his Marine Park garage, near Stuart Street, when the suspect put a gun to his head and demanded his watch, ring and cellphone. After getting the goods, the robber ran north on Gerritsen Avenue and then jumped into a waiting white Acura TL on Avenue R.
  • On September 10, at 10:55am, in front of 325 Whitman Drive in Mill Basin, the 35-year-old female victim was getting out of her car when the man came up to her. He pointed a gun at her and forced her to hand over her watch and wallet, which contained $300 and credit cards. He fled on foot.
  • On September 14, at 9:35pm, approached his victim near West 1st Street and Village Road South in Gravesend as the 56-year-old man walked out of his driveway. He flashed a gun and pulled off his wedding ring and his watch before running off to a car and driving away.
  • A 78-year-old man and 74-year-old woman were robbed next, on September 17 at 9pm, on the corner of Avenue Z and Batchelder Street. The two were walking when the man approached, flashed his gun and took a watch before fleeing.

No one was injured in any of these incidents. Using descriptions from the witnesses, cops were able to make the sketch above.

Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477).  The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

Photo by Victoria K.

Photo by Victoria K.

Ocean Warehouse Liquors & Wine is setting up shop at 2965 Ocean Avenue, just north of Avenue Z.

The new business put signs up a week or two ago, but hasn’t yet rolled up its gates to customers. It replaces Kamron, a relatively short-lived Eastern European market, which itself replaces Ocean Bagels. That business took over the spot when Bagel Boy moved to its current location near the subway station.

Na zda-ró-vye, Ocean Warehouse!

kastattoo

Ink-lovers take note, KasTattoo, formerly of Coney Island Avenue, has been resurrected in a new storefront  on Avenue Z, half a mile away from their previous location.

The new location, at 2103 Avenue Z, opened less than a month ago. It replaces the offices of ZRealty Services.

The owner, Kas Vilkas, wrote to tell us to say that “everybody’s welcome.”

His previous location at 2631 Coney Island Avenue opened in 2009. It shuttered in 2012, and was replaced by Tattoo Kulture.

Welcome back, KasTattoo, and good luck!

supermoon

C’mon, it was either “out of this world” or “stellar.” Maybe “cosmic”? Whatever spacey word choice you prefer, it’s awesome.

Local photographer Jeff Newman captured this photo of last night’s supermoon, assisted by Kim Patrick Clow, who submitted it to us. Supermoons occur when the moon, while full, swings closest to Earth in its orbit, and Sunday’s was the brightest and closest to earth in 20 years. While it’s set to happen again on September 9, yesterday’s was the biggest and brightest it will appear for another two decades.

To get the photo, Newman set up his tripod and camera on the small, triangular greenspace on East 13th Street and Avenue Z. They pointed the camera east, towards the moon’s rise.

For the photo wonks out there, this was shot using a Nikon D810 at 300 mm, ISO 100, shutter speed of 1/125 and an aperature at f/5.6.

Did anybody else get some snazzy shots of the supermoon? Send them over to editor@sheepsheadbites.com.

It’s not the first time we’ve asked that question, and the answer we’ve gotten in the past from readers and local officials is “No.”

Yet, following the mid-July meeting between Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz and Department of Sanitation Borough Superintendent Joe Lupo, in which the pol said Lupo agreed “immediate action needs to be taken,” it seems the only action taken so far is the removal of a handful of public litter baskets. 

There’s this one at Avenue Z and East 17th Street that we were keeping an eye on. It was overflowing the day Cymbrowitz had his meeting, and despite the “immediate action” it stayed overflowing for nearly a week, with debris blowing into the intersection.

Photo by Vickie P.

Photo by Vickie P.

And then when they finally emptied it, they took the can away as well:

Submitted by reader.

Submitted by reader.

And while people who would normally litter continue to litter, those who are responsible are the ones burdened by the removal of these trash cans.

“Had to carry doggy poop for blocks because apparently their solution to the overflowing garbage situation was to remove the garbage can,” the reader who submitted the above photo said.

We also noticed fewer cans on Sheepshead Bay Road.

Now, we have shown in the past that removing a bin can lead to less litter on a corner, but more pickups would have the same effect without inconveniencing anybody.

And before we hear this “budget cut” nonsense, it’s worth noting that except for one year, the budget of the Department of Sanitation has increased every year for the past five years. Womp womp.

We had quite the dramatic storm yesterday, chock full of sudden downpours, dramatic clouds and a hell of a thunder and lightning show.

Local videographer Bona Weiss filmed in time-lapse the menacing clouds as they rolled over his apartment, not far from Avenue Z and Ocean Avenue.

Pretty cool video, though we wish some of that lightning could have made a cameo. But cool nonetheless.

Next »