Archive for the tag 'allan shweky'

Photo by Allan Shweky

I understand why the girl (center) is wearing a 1-UP shirt. (Photo by Allan Shweky)

Masters of poise and balance gathered together to ride across the city on unicycles for the third annual Unicycle Festival. Sheepshead Bites reader and “Friends of Ocean Parkway” blogger Allan Shweky sent us some wonderful pictures of talented unicycle enthusiasts wobbling away by Ocean Parkway.

Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz finally declared this past Friday “Brooklyn Unicycle Day,” as talented unicyclists took part in a three-day long-distance ride. Allan described the path of the unicycle riders on his blog:

The long distance ride starts at City Hall in Manhattan, crosses the Brooklyn Bridge, and continues to Coney Island. The total distance of the ride is approximately 13 miles.

The ride was organized the Unicycle Bridge Tour. Here are some more pictures provided by Allan. Thanks for all the great stuff!

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo by Allan Shweky

Photo courtesy of Allan Shweky

Photo courtesy of Allan Shweky

Those wacky kids at Improv Everywhere returned to the beaches of Coney Island and Brighton Beach, decked out in their best formal wear. Sheepshead Bites reader Allan Shweky, who also runs Friends of Ocean Parkway, captured some photos of the comedy group as they invaded the beach and boardwalk.

This isn’t the first time that Improv Everywhere visited the beaches of Southern Brooklyn. We last covered their madcap antics way back in 2010 as they hit the sands, applied sunscreen and splashed around the ocean in ridiculously out-of-place formal outfits. This was the fourth annual Black Tie Beach event launched by the group and it looks like everybody involved had a good, silly time.

Anyone else catch these merry pranksters this past Sunday?

Photo courtesy of Allan Shweky

Photo courtesy of Allan Shweky

Photo courtesy of Allan Shweky

Photo courtesy of Allan Shweky

Avenue Z between E. 7 St and Coney Island Avenue (Source

Avenue Z between East 7 Street and Coney Island Avenue (Photo via Allan Shweky)

Sheepshead Bites reader and Friends of Ocean Parkway blogger Allan Shweky sent us this photo of Avenue Z between East 7 Street and Coney Island Avenue with the following message:

Here’s a pic that I shot using my new telephoto lens. Sign congestion.  There are over 30 signs of every type, shape and size on both sides of Avenue Z between E. 7 St and Coney Island Avenue. Feel safer crossing CIA?

Good question Allan.

Photo by Allan Shweky via screwedontheboardwalk.com

Photo by Allan Shweky via screwedontheboardwalk.com

The city has begun the process of removing tress damaged by Superstorm Sandy. Sheepshead Bites reader Allan Shweky, who runs the Friends of Ocean Parkway posted a series of photographs on a new site of his, Screwed on the Boardwalk, showing Parks Department workers chopping down trees left dead or dying as a result of Sandy.

As we’ve previously reported, a scourge of dead and dying trees can be spotted in neighborhoods across Southern Brooklyn. The reason that so many trees died isn’t precisely known but experts have speculated that salt water dried out the roots once the summer turned up the heat.

Shweky’s photo collection shows Parks Department workers removing trees near the boardwalk entrance on Ocean Parkway and we’ve also had word that similar actions are being taken on Shore Parkway, along the Belt Parkway.

R.I.P. trees, and here’s hoping the city makes an effort to replant everything they chop down.

Photo by Allan Shweky via screwedontheboardwalk.com

Only a stump remains. (Photo by Allan Shweky via screwedontheboardwalk.com)

Tipster Allan Shweky just sent us the above photo, letting us know that a driver apparently lost control of his vehicle, driving up on the sidewalk and smashed into a U.S. Postal Service mailbox and the brickwork in front of a home. It looks like major damage was done to the brickwork.

The incident occurred after 3:00 p.m. on Avenue Z and Hubbard Street.

Shweky didn’t have any additional information.

The Brooklyn Half Marathon kicked off on Saturday, bringing a brigade of 15,000 runners to Ocean Parkway and the Coney Island boardwalk.

For many, it was a great day of fun and sun, as runners finished up before noon and chowed down at Coney Island restaurants. But drivers and residents around the parkway groaned at the inconvenience, and found the communication about road closures and detours to be lacking.

Allan Shweky, founder of Friends of Ocean Parkway, sent in the photos in this post that show both sides of marathon: runners having fun, and drivers getting screwed. He writes with the following suggestion for future years:

Traffic gridlock along the southbound service road of Ocean Parkway could have been eased on Saturday if there was a plan to find the best detour routes for drivers (probably most of them) who wanted to go to the eastbound Belt Parkway..  For example, in one of the photo drivers should have been diverted at this point to take the belt service road west to Shell road, turn left and swing back around to the eastbound Belt service road that leads directly to the onramp of the BP.  But traffic was kept in this ridiculous single file which forced drivers to go past Lincoln HS before they could turn right to find the Belt entrance to go east. Here are a few photos of gridlock on Neptune Avenue, Seabreeze Avenue, Coney Island Avenue and the Belt.  The photo of people waiting in front of Coney Island Hospital for a bus (B1,B36, or B4) without any information posted on the detour.  What happened with the “service changes” that the MTA is so diligent in posting at all affected subway stations. (I spoke to one bus driver who was just given the new route but didn’t know how to get to the Belt).   Down near the Belt the buses would get to the other side of OP by taking the Belt Pkwy. I can’t speak for bus routes further north on Ocean Pkwy.   Did you get any feedback on the marathon impact on the residents of our community?

And as far as I know only your newspaper listed the new bus routes.  Signs should have been posted on all bus shelters in the affected areas.

A real failure to communicate.

What did you think of the marathon? Could planning have been improved?

Check out the rest of Allan’s photos.

A photo of a car-less Ocean Parkway, after the 2010 Half Marathon (Source: AMRosario/Flickr)

Fifteen thousands runners will trot down Ocean Parkway from Prospect Park to Coney Island Avenue on Saturday, as a larger-than-ever Brooklyn Half Marthon takes to the streets.

The marathon will spur rolling street closures down Ocean Parkway as runners arrive on the block. They’ll reopen as the last participants come through, with every street expected to fully reopen by 11:30 a.m. The marathon ends on the Riegelmann Boardwalk, an element that, along with the street closures, drew the ire of local residents.

Along with the street closures, the following buses will be detoured from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.:

  • B1, B11, B3, B35, B36, B4, B41, B6, B68, B8, B82, B9

Full details of each detour provided after the jump.

A photo of a car-less Ocean Parkway, after the 2010 Half Marathon (Source: AMRosario/Flickr)

As organizers at the New York Road Runners plan to nearly triple the number of participants in the Brooklyn Half Marathon this year, which runs down Ocean Parkway, locals are fuming over potential traffic snarls and damage to the Coney Island Boardwalk.

Sizable changes were made to the route of this year’s Brooklyn Half Marathon to accommodate as many as 15,000 runners – up from 5,921 last year. The race, scheduled to take place on May 19, takes runners down a long stretch of Ocean Parkway, ending on the Riegelmann Boardwalk in Coney Island – sparking concern from residents and preservationists.

“What is the plan for Ocean Parkway? How will pedestrians be able to cross the street and how will traffic get around?” asked Allan Shweky, founder of Friends of Ocean Parkway. “The only other alternative is really the Belt Parkway.”

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