Archive for the tag 'aldi food market'

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Blink Fitness, a no-frills gym, will open in December at 3827 Nostrand Avenue, the former site of Pathmark.

Readers began sending us tips about a possible gym at the location as early as a month ago, and more frequently as fencing went up at the property indicating interior work. The item came up at last week’s Community Board 15 meeting, when it was approved for a special application to allow a physical culture establishment.

They gym already lists the location on their website, noting that it will open in late December.

It replaces the second half of Pathmark, which shuttered in 2011 amid bankruptcy proceedings. Brooklyn’s first Aldi supermarket takes up the remainder of the Pathmark footprint.

Source: katerha via flickr

Source: katerha via flickr

The City Council is planning to introduce legislation that would charge consumers 10 cents at grocery and retail stores for plastic bags if they don’t bring their own reusable bags to checkout lines. Politicker is reporting that the proposed legislation, which is aimed at reducing waste, will come to a vote on Thursday (Corrected: See below)

If customers don’t bring their own bags to stores, they will be hit with a dime surcharge that the stores will get to keep. Politicker noted that proponents of the bill have big numbers to back their insistence on the measure as well as the difference between this bill and a similar tax proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg that went unsupported by the Council:

According to the bill’s proponents, New Yorkers use approximately 5.2 billion plastic bags per year–the vast majority of which are not recycled. The city also spends an estimated $10 million a year to transport those 100,000 tons of plastic bags to landfills each year, they said.

Mayor Bloomberg had previously proposed a similar piece of legislation that would have imposed a 6 cent tax on retailers distributing plastic bags–a policy proposal that City Council Speaker Christine Quinn did not support. But Mr. [Brad] Lander made a clear distinction today between the two pieces of legislation.

“What the mayor was actually proposing was a tax,” he said. “There are some legal questions there about whether the city actually has the power to do that or whether that takes action in Albany.”

The new proposed piece of legislation would not require this oversight from the State Legislature, but would provide the same environmentally-positive impact, Mr. Lander explained.

Part of the legislation would also include fines for stores that don’t follow the new rules, and will provide distribution of the reusable bags to lower income neighborhoods:

The bill also specifies that grocery and retail stores will be precluded from charging the fee until people are given the chance to take advantage of the citywide bag giveaways.

“We’re going to target the giveaway in lower-income neighborhoods. I think we’d actually like to do a meaningful amount of that through the grocery stores,” Mr. Lander explained.

Restaurants would be exempt from the rule and stores that break the rules twice would be slapped with $250 fines.

The charging for bags practice is already in place right here in Southern Brooklyn at the new Aldi Foodmarket (3785 Nostrand Avenue). Politicker also pointed out that similar legislation is present in other cities, including San Francisco and Washington D.C.

The American Progressive Bag Alliance, which is a real lobbying group that represents bag manufacturers, unsurprisingly came out against the proposed legislation:

“New York City residents already pay among the highest taxes in the nation. A 10-cent per bag tax would be a detriment to hardworking families and businesses trying to make ends meet,” said the group’s chair, Mark Daniels. “The proponents of this bill are misinformed and largely rely on science that has been hijacked by environmental activists. A grocery bag tax pushes shoppers toward less sustainable options, like reusable bags, which cannot be recycled, are made from foreign oil and imported at a rate of 500 million annually.”

“If lawmakers are interested in protecting the environment, they should consider the facts and concentrate on meaningful legislation to boost proper reuse and disposal of grocery bags,” he said.

The question remains if the City Council bends to the will of America’s powerful bagging interests.

CORRECTION (8/22/13 10:42 a.m.): The previous version of this article suggested that there would be a vote today. The legislation is solely being introduced today and will have a hearing at a later date, possibly followed by a vote.

The hanging of the Aldi sign begins. Photo by Max Bolotov

The new Aldi Food Market (3785 Nostrand Ave) is coming alive. Photographs reveal that the low-cost food market, a sister company to Trader Joe’s, has begun to hang up their storefront signs.

Last October Sheepshead Bites was first to report on the construction of the new Aldi Food Market being built on the same spot that once occupied a Pathmark. The new food market will only be half the size of the Pathmark at 18,000 square feet and is expected to employ less people, but it’s still another shopping option for those lamenting the loss of the supermarket.

“Now I can walk the neighborhood without people asking when and where we’ll have a new supermarket,” Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein told Sheepshead Bites last October.

Thanks to Erica Sherman, Bart E. and Max Bolotov for the latest photographs of the construction efforts at the Aldi spot.

Photo by Bart E.

A Peek Inside The Construction of Aldi’s Interior. Photo By Erica Sherman

A Look At Aldi’s Customer Parking Lot. Photo By Max Bolotov

A Coming Soon Sign Pasted In The Store Window. Photo By Erica Sherman

Photo by Neil Friedman

Aldi Food Market, slated to replace the defunct Pathmark at 3785 Nostrand Avenue next October, will be only half the size of its predecessor, but local pols say that it will still fulfill their promise of bringing in a notable anchor tenant to revitalize the commercial corridor, restore shoppers’ options and revive jobs in the community.

Sheepshead Bites has learned that the former Pathmark location, which occupied 35,000 square feet, is being subdivided into two storefronts, with Aldi filling 18,000 square feet of the property. The second tenant has not yet been signed. Both will have Nostrand Avenue storefronts (as opposed to Pathmark, which had its entrance on the south side of the building), and rooftop parking will remain at the location.

Find out more details about Aldi’s move to the neighborhood, and what local leaders say in response to its smaller size.

Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein, Councilman Lew Fidler and Community Board 15 Chairperson Theresa Scavo joined with representatives of the Lefrak organization and Aldi market today to announce that the German-based grocer has signed on to replace Pathmark at 3785 Nostrand Avenue.

The storefront has sat empty since April 2011 as local elected and the landlord, Lefrak, scrambled to find a supermarket replacement – one of the top constituent demands, the pols said.

“This is a location that has hundreds of thousands of people desperate for a store they could walk to. I know because when I walk around and talk to residents, that’s the only question they want to know,” said Weinstein. “They don’t want to know what’s happening in Albany, they don’t want to know what’s happening in the budget. They just want to know, ‘When can I walk with my cart to go to the store and buy something?’”

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Photo by Erica Sherman

YOU READ IT HERE FIRST: Neighbors who want a Trader Joe’s to replace Pathmark at 3785 Nostrand Avenue may be happy to learn that Aldi, a low-cost food market owned by Trader Joe’s parent company, will soon serve up fresh produce and other groceries from the currently defunct storefront beginning late next year.

A customer service representative for the international company confirmed to Sheepshead Bites that Aldi is slated to open at 3785 Nostrand Avenue in October 2013.

Aldi, based in Germany, operates more than 1,200 stores in the United States, and is owned by the same parent company as Trader Joe’s. The company has been growing, with plans to add 80 stores this year to its roster of 75 existing operations. They opened their first two New York City locations in 2011 – first in Queens and a second in the Bronx. And, earlier this month, they celebrated the grand opening of a Manhattan location.

Keep reading to find out more about Aldi and the deal at 3785 Nostrand Avenue.