Archive for the tag '2601 ocean pkwy'

The following flier was sent to us from the Brooklyn Streetcar Artists Group and the Independent Committee at Coney Island Hospital:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Got a housing problem, either as a homeowner or as a renter? Brooklyn Housing and Family Services is the borough’s largest organization to help those in need to protect their property, their rights, their quality of life, and their finances.

Check out this one-on-one housing clinic at Coney Island Hospital at 2601 Ocean Parkway, at 3:30 p.m. and get informed!

baby

The labor and delivery team at Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) delivered the hospital’s first tot of 2014 at 12:22 a.m. on January 1, welcoming Madison Rae Merrill into the world.

Madison is the 7-pound-5-ounce, 19.5-inch child bringing joy to mom, Allison Zimbler, and pop, Jesse Merrill.

Congratulations and good luck to the new parents!

The following flier was sent to us from the Brooklyn Streetcar Artists Group and the Independent Committee at Coney Island Hospital:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Got a housing problem, either as a homeowner or as a renter? Brooklyn Housing and Family Services is the borough’s largest organization to help those in need to protect their property, their rights, their quality of life, and their finances.

Check out this one-on-one housing clinic at Coney Island Hospital at 2601 Ocean Parkway, at 3:30 p.m. and get informed!

Seigel with staff and volunteers during the turkey raffle.

Seigel with staff and volunteers during the turkey raffle.

A CIH community affairs member with a patient during the turkey raffle.

A CIH community affairs member with a patient during the turkey raffle.

Eleven years ago, a doctor at Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) decided to do more than heal his patients, he wanted to ensure they had full stomachs on Thanksgiving eve. So Dr. Warren Seigel, chairman of the hospital’s pediatrics department and director of adolescent medicine, kicked off an annual tradition of raising money to raffle off turkeys and halal chickens to his patients in need.

Seigel and his team raised enough money this year to distribute 102 turkeys and halal chickens before the holiday. Most of the funds came from employees at the hospital and support from Metroplus.

The tradition began 11 years ago when Seigel was surprised to find that many of his patients would not have a traditional holiday turkey. At first he thought it was a cultural difference – the hospital’s patience cover the gamut of Brooklyn’s diversity – but later learned that many couldn’t afford the holiday fowl.

Seigel, though, didn’t want to simply hold a turkey giveaway for needy patients.

“We were very sensitive to the fact that people don’t want to receive a handout,” he said. So he turned it into an event with movies, face painting and other entertainment for his adolescent patients, and held a free raffle for the turkeys and chickens as part of the event. “So it’s not like we just gave them something; they won something,” he said.

No one left the event empty-handed, he noted, saying that toys and treats were also distributed.

Although the event was born 11 years ago, this was only the 10th time they did it. Superstorm Sandy squashed the plans last year.

“When Sandy hit we had no electricity. We had no way to do this. We couldn’t even pick up the turkeys because there was no gas in our cars. It made us feel bad because it was the time when people needed it the most,” Seigel recalled.

But the return of the tradition, and the enormous amount they managed to distribute this year, signaled a welcome return to normalcy.

“It’s just wonderful. It makes [our patients] feel so wonderful and it reminds all of us how lucky we are,” Seigel said.

coney

Coney Island Hospital is deploying its dietitians and other medical professionals to help educate the community on healthy eating. As obesity continues to plague Americans, the hospital is hoping to help stem the tide and reduce rates of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases by preventing them before they happen.

Come check it out tomorrow evening, at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium on the second floor. There will be giveaways and refreshments, but we’re pretty sure no Twinkies.

Source: Gregory Maizous

Source: Gregory Maizous

I don’t know about you, but this chilly, grey weather has got me feeling such that all I want to do is curl up into a ball in the corner of my office and have myself a little cry. I’m sure I can’t be the only one.

So for those of us who suffer a little seasonal trauma or symptoms of a much deeper, darker problem, Coney Island Hospital is participating in the city’s Health and Hospitals Corporation’s Mental Illness Awareness Week with free depression screenings and counseling services tomorrow.

Twelve HHC facilities Hospital across the city including Coney Island will offer the free services tomorrow, October 10, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The confidential screenings will be conducted by mental health professionals in individual, private consultations and are designed to identify symptoms of depression and mood disorders. Patients requiring assistance will be referred to appropriate levels of treatment within each facility.

Here’s some information about depression from the HHC’s news release:

Depression is a common yet serious medical condition, characterized by pervasive low mood; loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities; and significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning. Other symptoms can include difficulty concentrating, loss of energy, trouble sleeping, changes in weight, feelings of worthlessness and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, each year, depression affects more than 400,000 (8 percent) adult New Yorkers, but only one-third of these individuals receives treatment. Early detection and treatment can reduce suffering and improve quality of life. Depression can worsen the course and complicate the treatment of other health conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. In its most serious and tragic form, depression can lead to suicide.

Feel free to contact Coney Island Hospital with any questions or concerns: Coney Island Hospital; 2601 Ocean Parkway; (718) 616-3000.

Source: Gregory Maizous

Source: Gregory Maizous

Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) is taking part in the city’s Take Care New York campaign in an effort to battle obesity, and provide health screenings and flu shots. According to a press release, the event is being organized by the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) and will run throughout the month of October.

The focus of the event centers around fighting obesity. The HHC press release detailed the harrowing statistics that point to the seriousness of the obesity problem:

In New York City, over 50 percent of adults and 40 percent of children are overweight or obese. The obesity epidemic strikes hardest in communities already suffering from health and economic disparities, particularly black, Latino and low-income communities where the rate of overweight and obesity reaches 70 percent in some neighborhoods.

Senior director of HHC’s Office of Healthcare Improvement, Dr. David Stevens, detailed the scary risks of living with obesity and noted how the Take Care New York campaign is looking to educate people with the aim of helping them lead healthier lives.

“Adults and children who are overweight are at increased risk for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, arthritis and cancer. HHC hospitals and health centers can help New Yorkers commit to be fit in just a few simple steps. Eating right, exercising and losing weight can improve your health and decrease the risk of chronic disease. A few minutes of preventive care save a life,” Stevens said in the release.

If you are interested in attending, the Take Care New York campaign screenings will take place in the main lobby of the Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) on October 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. For more information on the event, click here.

Source: Gregory Maizous

Coney Island Hospital (Source: Gregory Maizous)

Workers who were contracted to clean up three New York hospitals, including Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) received thousands of dollars in back wages, after their employer initially stiffed them. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Signal Restoration Services, a Michigan-based company, underpaid workers toiling in New York City hospitals post-Sandy.

Signal Restoration Services is said to have paid their 500 employees $12-$15 an hour, compared to the prevailing wage of $16.99 an hour and $25.49 an hour for overtime. The Journal described the terms of the settlement:

The Troy, Mich.-based company that contracted to clean up Bellevue Hospital, Coney Island Hospital and Coler-Goldwater Memorial Hospital in New York City has agreed to pay $466,000 in back wages, $25,000 to the attorney general’s office and $46,000 into an escrow account. The agreement was signed this week.

Good news. Those workers, as well as the staff of Coney Island Hospital in general, had a heck of a job to do after Superstorm Sandy flooded the facility and left Southern Brooklyn’s only major medical center out-of-order. Their work helped get the hospital back online as quick as it did, and they deserve the money they earned.

61st Precinct police station located at 2575 Coney Island Avenue. (Source: Google Maps)

61st Precinct police station located at 2575 Coney Island Avenue. (Source: Google Maps)

A prisoner, arrested on charges of drug possession, used his shirt to hang himself in the 61st Precinct police station (2575 Coney Island Avenue). According to a report in the New York Daily News, the prisoner was taken to Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) but died there this past Thursday.

The 29-year-old prisoner, who remains unidentified, was arrested on August 30 when police discovered he had ketamine, a hallucinogenic drug, stashed in his car. After his arrest, he was found hanging in his cell at 5:45 a.m. The Daily News described the subsequent investigation that is now to be taken place:

Internal Affairs is looking into whether cops followed the rule that requires them to check on prisoners every 30 minutes.

“I can tell you that we do an in-depth investigation any time anything like this happens, and that is precisely what’s going on now,” Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said.

“So we are looking at that aggressively, Internal Affairs division along with the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office.”

Source: mikey k via flickr

Source: mikey k via flickr

A 43-year-old man rammed a stolen SUV into the support pillars holding up the Q train at West Brighton Avenue and West 2nd Street in Brighton Beach, killing himself and injuring his girlfriend. The New York Daily News is reporting that the victim was just released from the mental ward of Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) days prior to the accident.

The Daily News provided more details to this peculiar story which happened early yesterday morning, at 2 a.m.:

The man, whose name was not immediately available, died at the scene. His girlfriend, who was in the back seat of the stolen vehicle, was brought to Lutheran Medical Center with a black eye, sources said.

The SUV’s owner did not know the vehicle was missing until contacted by police after the accident, sources said.

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