Archive for the tag '2601 ocean pkwy'

Source: Gregory Maizous

Source: Gregory Maizous

Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) nabbed Healthgrades 2014 Maternity Care Excellence Award, marking the third consecutive year it has been recongized as one of the best hospitals for mothers and their offspring during and after childbirth.

Healthgrades is an organization that evaluates and ranks healthcare services at hospitals across the nation. The rankings for maternity care are based on an analysis of complications due to vaginal deliveries and C-sections, newborn mortality rates and percentage of newborns with low birth weight.

The Maternity Care Excellence Award is given to the top 10 percent of best performing hospitals for services to mothers and for the care of their newborn babies. According to Healthgrades, patients treated at Coney Island Hospital had a 54.4 percent lower risk of complications during natural delivery, and a 77.6 percent lower risk during C-section deliveries than those treated at low-ranking hospitals. It won the same recognition in 2012 and 2013.

“We are extremely proud to receive this distinction for the third year in a row which shows our consistency of providing high-quality care for women in Brooklyn during their pregnancy and childbirth, and the care of their newborn babies,” said Arthur Wagner, Coney Island Hospital’s executive direct, in a press release.

The hospital operates a dedicated Women’s Health Center, basically a one-stop shop for in- and out-patient needs, including labor and delivery, general obstetric and gynecological care, family planing and more.

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Associate Executive Director Robert Cooper speaks with one of the student artists.

Fifth-grade students from Manhattan Beach’s P.S. 95 (131 Irwin Street) today donated a dozen framed watercolor works they painted to Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway), and they will soon hang in patient areas to help lift patients’ spirits.

The works were produced by the students in Mr. William Lawson’s art class as part of a project called “The Art of Giving,” an annual program coordinated by the United Federation of Teachers to connect elementary school art classes with local hospitals.

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Student artists pose for a photo with Cooper and teacher William Lawson.

The Art of Giving, now in its fifth year, was inspired by the late Sharon Coates, a teacher at P.S. 156.While Coates was hospitalized, she was presented with student art.

“Seeing the children’s artwork on the walls lifted my spirits,” Coates later said, according to UFT Vice President for Elementary Schools Karen Alford, who was Coates’ union representative at the time. Alford later launched the program and continues to oversee it.

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A hospital staffer heaps praise on one of the student artists.

While at the hospital for the unveiling ceremony today, the students were treated to cookies and juice – as well as showered with gratitude from hospital staff including Associate Executive Director Robert Cooper and Chief Nurse Terry Mancher.

Mancher in particular was rigorously interrogated by the students, some of whom said they’d like to be doctors or nurses. She told them of the tremendously rewarding experiences she’s had, explained the difference between medical school and nursing school and clarified that, no, doctors are not bosses to the nurses.

She also talked about the vital role Coney Island Hospital nurses played during Superstorm Sandy, when much of the staff stayed on-site even as power in the facility failed, and how they assisted in the evacuation after the storm.

The following announcement was sent to us from the office of New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer:

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The following flier was sent to us from the Brooklyn Streetcar Artists Group and the Independent Committee at Coney Island Hospital:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Got a housing problem, either as a homeowner or as a renter? Brooklyn Housing and Family Services is the borough’s largest organization to help those in need to protect their property, their rights, their quality of life, and their finances.

Check out this one-on-one housing clinic at Coney Island Hospital at 2601 Ocean Parkway, at 3:30 p.m. and get informed!

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The labor and delivery team at Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) delivered the hospital’s first tot of 2014 at 12:22 a.m. on January 1, welcoming Madison Rae Merrill into the world.

Madison is the 7-pound-5-ounce, 19.5-inch child bringing joy to mom, Allison Zimbler, and pop, Jesse Merrill.

Congratulations and good luck to the new parents!

The following flier was sent to us from the Brooklyn Streetcar Artists Group and the Independent Committee at Coney Island Hospital:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Got a housing problem, either as a homeowner or as a renter? Brooklyn Housing and Family Services is the borough’s largest organization to help those in need to protect their property, their rights, their quality of life, and their finances.

Check out this one-on-one housing clinic at Coney Island Hospital at 2601 Ocean Parkway, at 3:30 p.m. and get informed!

Seigel with staff and volunteers during the turkey raffle.

Seigel with staff and volunteers during the turkey raffle.

A CIH community affairs member with a patient during the turkey raffle.

A CIH community affairs member with a patient during the turkey raffle.

Eleven years ago, a doctor at Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) decided to do more than heal his patients, he wanted to ensure they had full stomachs on Thanksgiving eve. So Dr. Warren Seigel, chairman of the hospital’s pediatrics department and director of adolescent medicine, kicked off an annual tradition of raising money to raffle off turkeys and halal chickens to his patients in need.

Seigel and his team raised enough money this year to distribute 102 turkeys and halal chickens before the holiday. Most of the funds came from employees at the hospital and support from Metroplus.

The tradition began 11 years ago when Seigel was surprised to find that many of his patients would not have a traditional holiday turkey. At first he thought it was a cultural difference – the hospital’s patience cover the gamut of Brooklyn’s diversity – but later learned that many couldn’t afford the holiday fowl.

Seigel, though, didn’t want to simply hold a turkey giveaway for needy patients.

“We were very sensitive to the fact that people don’t want to receive a handout,” he said. So he turned it into an event with movies, face painting and other entertainment for his adolescent patients, and held a free raffle for the turkeys and chickens as part of the event. “So it’s not like we just gave them something; they won something,” he said.

No one left the event empty-handed, he noted, saying that toys and treats were also distributed.

Although the event was born 11 years ago, this was only the 10th time they did it. Superstorm Sandy squashed the plans last year.

“When Sandy hit we had no electricity. We had no way to do this. We couldn’t even pick up the turkeys because there was no gas in our cars. It made us feel bad because it was the time when people needed it the most,” Seigel recalled.

But the return of the tradition, and the enormous amount they managed to distribute this year, signaled a welcome return to normalcy.

“It’s just wonderful. It makes [our patients] feel so wonderful and it reminds all of us how lucky we are,” Seigel said.

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Coney Island Hospital is deploying its dietitians and other medical professionals to help educate the community on healthy eating. As obesity continues to plague Americans, the hospital is hoping to help stem the tide and reduce rates of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases by preventing them before they happen.

Come check it out tomorrow evening, at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium on the second floor. There will be giveaways and refreshments, but we’re pretty sure no Twinkies.

Source: Gregory Maizous

Source: Gregory Maizous

I don’t know about you, but this chilly, grey weather has got me feeling such that all I want to do is curl up into a ball in the corner of my office and have myself a little cry. I’m sure I can’t be the only one.

So for those of us who suffer a little seasonal trauma or symptoms of a much deeper, darker problem, Coney Island Hospital is participating in the city’s Health and Hospitals Corporation’s Mental Illness Awareness Week with free depression screenings and counseling services tomorrow.

Twelve HHC facilities Hospital across the city including Coney Island will offer the free services tomorrow, October 10, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The confidential screenings will be conducted by mental health professionals in individual, private consultations and are designed to identify symptoms of depression and mood disorders. Patients requiring assistance will be referred to appropriate levels of treatment within each facility.

Here’s some information about depression from the HHC’s news release:

Depression is a common yet serious medical condition, characterized by pervasive low mood; loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities; and significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning. Other symptoms can include difficulty concentrating, loss of energy, trouble sleeping, changes in weight, feelings of worthlessness and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, each year, depression affects more than 400,000 (8 percent) adult New Yorkers, but only one-third of these individuals receives treatment. Early detection and treatment can reduce suffering and improve quality of life. Depression can worsen the course and complicate the treatment of other health conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. In its most serious and tragic form, depression can lead to suicide.

Feel free to contact Coney Island Hospital with any questions or concerns: Coney Island Hospital; 2601 Ocean Parkway; (718) 616-3000.

Source: Gregory Maizous

Source: Gregory Maizous

Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) is taking part in the city’s Take Care New York campaign in an effort to battle obesity, and provide health screenings and flu shots. According to a press release, the event is being organized by the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) and will run throughout the month of October.

The focus of the event centers around fighting obesity. The HHC press release detailed the harrowing statistics that point to the seriousness of the obesity problem:

In New York City, over 50 percent of adults and 40 percent of children are overweight or obese. The obesity epidemic strikes hardest in communities already suffering from health and economic disparities, particularly black, Latino and low-income communities where the rate of overweight and obesity reaches 70 percent in some neighborhoods.

Senior director of HHC’s Office of Healthcare Improvement, Dr. David Stevens, detailed the scary risks of living with obesity and noted how the Take Care New York campaign is looking to educate people with the aim of helping them lead healthier lives.

“Adults and children who are overweight are at increased risk for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, arthritis and cancer. HHC hospitals and health centers can help New Yorkers commit to be fit in just a few simple steps. Eating right, exercising and losing weight can improve your health and decrease the risk of chronic disease. A few minutes of preventive care save a life,” Stevens said in the release.

If you are interested in attending, the Take Care New York campaign screenings will take place in the main lobby of the Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) on October 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. For more information on the event, click here.

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