Archive for the tag '2201 neptune ave'

Photo by Maria Danalakis

The following is a press release from Coney Island Hospital, which was been rolling out services after being shuttered by Superstorm Sandy:

Coney Island Hospital (CIH) today announced the re-opening of its Women, Infants and Children (WIC) food and nutrition program made possible with a $50,000 grant from Public Health Solutions (PHS) and the Robin Hood Foundation (RHF). The two WIC offices run by Coney Island Hospital have been closed since Hurricane Sandy, affecting 5,000 participants. The grant funding will establish a temporary new WIC office in the community to serve clients from the center that was located inside the hospital campus and is now undergoing repairs, and a second center that operated out of the Ida G. Israel Community Health Center, which is permanently closed.

The new WIC temporary offices are located at Luna Park Senior Center, 2880 West 12th Street, Room 4, Brooklyn, and are open Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The new site was chosen for its easy access to public transportation and proximity to the former Ida G. Israel Community Health Center. The grant will cover the rent of the temporary location, new office furniture, supplies, and clinical equipment. The Public Health Solutions and the Robin Hood Foundation are also supporting the Coney Island Hospital WIC staff with client and community outreach, as well as client coordination in the clinic.

“We are pleased to welcome back our WIC program clients – the women and children who depend on this vital food and nutrition assistance to keep their families healthy,” said Isabel Diaz, Director of WIC programs at Coney Island Hospital. “The opening of our temporary site at Luna Park, thanks to Public Health Solutions and the Robin Hood Foundation, is a huge comfort to our patients and a major step towards our recovery after Hurricane Sandy.”

“Public Health Solutions and its Neighborhood WIC program have been glad to be a part of Hurricane Sandy recovery work,” said Louise Cohen, Vice President, Public Health Programs at PHS. “We have had a great collaboration with the Coney Island Hospital WIC program as well as with New York State Department of Health WIC, to get this program up and running again to serve families in Coney Island. We are grateful to the Robin Hood Foundation for funding this recovery work.”

The WIC Program is federally funded special supplemental nutrition program that serves to safeguard the health of low-income, nutritionally at-risk Women, Infants and Children (to age 5).

The WIC program provides:

  • Nutritious foods to supplement diets of WIC eligible participants
  • Nutrition assessment and education on healthy eating and physical activity
  • Breastfeeding support and counseling
  • Referrals for health care and other social services

Source: Coney Island Hospital

The Ida G. Israel Health Center, a Coney Island Hospital-affiliated health clinic, has been closed since Superstorm Sandy knocked it out of commission this past October. The city’s Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) has since deemed it pointless to rebuild the center on the same 2201 Neptune Avenue location and are looking for higher ground, according to a report from WNYC News.

The current location, precariously located a few blocks away from the water, treats 42,000 visitors a year, providing service for children and adults covering primary care, dentistry and drug rehabilitation. Because of the vital role the center plays in a community with a lot of low-income patients, finding a new location has become a top priority for administrators.

“With this amount of devastation, it was felt the best thing to do was relocate the clinic in the community, so this would never happen again,” Dr. John Maese, medical director of Coney Island Hospital, told WNYC. “We want to make sure this clinic stands the test of time, since it’s such a valuable resource to the community.”

Since the center’s doors have shuttered, local residents have made their way to Coney Island Hospital, a somewhat inconvenient trek for local residents without vehicles.

Dr. Maese estimates that it will take 18 months to set up a new health center, most likely to be relocated in leased office space and will cost an estimated $8 million.