Coney Island Hospital, 2601 Ocean Parkway. (Source: Gregory Maizous)

Coney Island Hospital, 2601 Ocean Parkway. (Source: Gregory Maizous)

Earlier this week we brought you the news that Coney Island Hospital will construct a new elevated tower structure for all critical services, keeping them out of reach of flood waters in a future storm. Now, the hospital – the only major medical facility in Southern Brooklyn – has announced the completion of a $21 million project to make existing buildings more resilient and energy efficient.

The project, done in conjunction with the New York Power Authority and National Grid, includes new, flood-ready boilers as well as modernized windows. The hospital and the power experts say that it will cut the amount of greenhouse gases emitted by the institution by more than 7,000 tons per year, as well as save taxpayers as much as $1.2 million annually on the public hospital’s heating bill.

The entire thing started as an energy efficiency project prior to Sandy to replace 80-year-old oil-based heating equipment. But the planners went back to the drawing board before forging ahead on the new, natural gas-based boilers to make it more storm-proof by elevating and waterproofing equipment.

The work is explained in the video below, which also features some of the hospital’s unheralded heroes from Superstorm Sandy – engineers, groundskeepers and others who made split second decisions on October 29, 2012, that ended up  reducing the damage done during the storm.

wolf-cave

Photo by Bob De Thomas

Emmons Avenue has a new restaurant in Wolf Cave, a decked out eatery and lounge on the corner of Batchelder Street.

Located at 3099 Emmons Avenue, the business opened its doors to diners about two weeks ago. They’ve yet to launch a website, but a waiter told us the menu includes salads, sandwiches, barbecued meats and sushi. In sum, he described it as “American-style barbecue.”

Photos on their Facebook page show a fairly cozy, almost hunting-themed restaurant. It’s decked out with warm colors, murals of wolves and trees, a fireplace and even a mounted deer head.

It’s also got a fairly rad, yet familiar, logo, seen on the awning above, which also declares Wolf Cave to be the place for “Good Natural Food”. They have live music in the evenings, Thursday to Sunday, which the waiter described as Russian-American.

The location has gone through a number of iterations the past few years. It housed a sushi spot, a Ukranian restaurant, and then, most recently, an Italian – Turkish pizza joint.

We wish Wolf Cave more success than their forbears, and hope to stop by soon to check it out!

Source: Flickr/mad-czech

Source: Flickr/mad-czech

Don’t bike and text at the same time. Seems pretty obvious, right? Apparently not to everyone.

Councilman Mark Treyger recently discovered that there is no actual law in New York City preventing people from biking and texting, after witnessing an near-crash on Stillwell Avenue. A biker was fiddling with his cellphone, when he suddenly veered into oncoming traffic causing several cars to screech to a halt.

After doing some research, Treyger found that not only doesn’t New York have a law preventing biking and texting, but the city doesn’t even offer bike safety classes.

“I think it’s great that more New Yorkers are biking, but we all play a role [in bike safety],” Treyger tells us. “There is no question that motorists play a role, but what I witnessed on Stillwell Avenue could have led to a very serious incident that could have included fatality.”

Today, Treyger will propose bike safety legislation that would make it illegal to ride a bike while operating a handheld device, following cities like Chicago, as was first reported by DNAinfo. If caught using a cellphone, bikers could expect to be fined $50. However, if the incident doesn’t cause injury of property damage, then the cyclist can take a bike safety class instead.

“The measures that I have recommended are the least punitive in the country,” Treyger says. “We want to promote education, responsibility, and safe bicycling.”

This legislation has the support of Bike New York, a bikers advocacy organization, as well as the chairman of the Council’s Transportation Committee.

Photo by Robin Michals

Photo by Robin Michals

Photo by Robin Michals

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

AndrewDiceClayOfficial.com

AndrewDiceClayOfficial.com

On the eve of the release of his new memoir, Sheepshead Bay native Andrew Dice Clay sat down with the Village Voice and recounted how he got his start in comedy.

The foul-mouthed comedian never intended to be a funnyman; he was a theater geek aiming to be an actor. But to warm up to the stage, he decided to tackle what he called “the toughest club in the country” – Sheepshead Bay’s Pips Comedy Club, formerly on Emmons Avenue.

Here’s what he said about the 1978 experience, and how it led Andrew Silverstein to become the Diceman:

That night would change my life. September 13, 1978. When I went on for the first time at Pips, that became my home until I came out to L.A. But I was very prepared to go on at Pips because I came up as a musician, as a drummer, and singer and entertainer. I was more into theater, so when I was thinking about getting on a comedy stage, it was more about having an act already. I didn’t want to “go up there and see what happens,” and I prepared a certain kind of act. I would come onstage as Jerry Lewis’s character from The Nutty Professor and take my magic formula, and turn into the John Travolta character from Grease.

At the time, Travolta was just the biggest star in the world. I mean, he was coming off the heels of [Saturday Night] Fever. We’d resembled each other since he was in Welcome Back, Kotter. We really looked similar; I could do a dead-on Travolta. But when I saw Grease at the Brighton theater in Brighton Beach and I saw him sing and dance, I said, “I have the act. I know what I can do.”

To perfect the act, Dice rehearsed at Kings Highway’s Fly Studios, then watched Grease and Fever over and over again, jotting down notes on the dance cues. He continues:

And that night when I went on at Pips, I came onstage as Jerry Lewis. My whole family was there: my parents, my sister, my grandmother, my friend Johnny. It was amateur night, and when I went on as the Nutty Professor, they’re booing me because I’m this nerd: “Get the fuck off the stage!”

But the club owner knew when to shut the light when I was doing my transition, took my magic formula. When I turned around as Travolta, they went ballistic, like it was Travolta. They were throwing tables over. You talk about a 90-seat club, with the air conditioning right in the ceiling: the toughest club in the country to play. When that would click on it was like a tractor going on. And I got hired to headline that weekend. The owners come over and they go, “Who’s your manager?” I look over at my father and go, “He is.” And that was it. I never came offstage for 10 years, until I made it.

Apparently, the comedian, who will also play a ’70s radio-station magnate in an upcoming Martin Scorsese series for HBO, feels Brooklyn is even worse than the bad, old days of the 1970s.

Brooklyn was a different world back then, and today it’s even worse. ‘Cause today it’s more bullies. That’s all you read about. And I always hated bullies. I wasn’t a bully in any way. I was tough, I could fight, but I wasn’t with the 15 guys coming over to one guy to terrorize him and kick him in the face. I hate that attitude.

Anyone remember Dice from the old ‘hood? Tell us about his performances at Pips!

Source: Youtube/Global Ambassador NYC

Source: Youtube/Global Ambassador NYC

Oh, Taylor. First you released that terrible, terrible single about our beloved city. Then we learned that it was just a publicity stunt for your new role as the “Global Welcome Ambassador” for New York City’s tourism department.

Well, some folks are not impressed with Taylor Swift’s shiny informational videos (such as this Tribeca-centric NYC vocabulary lesson). In a hilarious parody site (with a perfect domain: www.globalambassador.nyc), three native New Yorkers give the singer some pointers about what New York is really about.

“Brooklyn is not a bunch of bearded hipsters eating kale salad. It’s just good, working-class people in a lot of places,” Paul Bomba, 35, the writer and producer behind the site, told us. “I think Taylor Swift was chosen as a symbol of gentrification.”

Bomba, who grew up in Gravesend, was shocked when he learned that Swift was selected as Welcome Ambassador. So he decided to do something about it. He registered the NYC domain name and put out a casting call for native-born New York actors.

Queens-born Tommy Ray and Inwood-native Brianne Berkson responded, and last week the trio shot three videos on the rooftop of a Bushwick apartment building. Within days, Bomba had edited the footage and loaded them onto the site.

Bomba says his goal is to make people laugh and highlight the ridiculousness of the city’s choice of Swift.

“I just don’t think she gets it yet,” said Bomba. “Yes, New York City has more millionaires than any other city in the U.S. At the same time, there are eight million other people who don’t just show up in New York and can buy whatever apartment they want.”

“I’ve been here my entire life and I still have a lot to learn about the city,” he added.

Bomba has no hard feelings towards Swift, though.

“If she reaches out to me, I’d love to meet her and take her out for a slice of pizza at L&B Spumoni Gardens,” he said.

h/t Village Voice

Map of the coverage area for this NY Rising committee. Source: NY Rising

Map of the coverage area for this NY Rising committee. Source: NY Rising

Neighbors in Mill Basin, Mill Island, Marine Park, Bergen Beach, and Georgetown are invited to a public meeting tonight, Wednesday, November 12, to hear the latest from the state-sponsored NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program and provide input on projects proposed for funding, designed to meet the community’s recovery needs. This program aims to leverage local knowledge and build upon existing efforts and plans to help storm-impacted communities become more resilient through innovative community-driven plans.

When:          Wednesday, November 12 – 7pm-9pm
Where:         Saint Bernard School Auditorium, 2030 East 69th Street, Brooklyn NY 11234
Who:            Southeast Brooklyn Waterfront Planning Committee (including Bergen Beach, Georgetown, Marine Park, Mill Basin, Mill Island), NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program
Contact:       Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery, info@stormrecovery.ny.gov

The NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program is one of several Storm Recovery Initiatives and was established to provide additional rebuilding and revitalization assistance to Communities severely damaged by Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. To facilitate community redevelopment planning and the resilience of Communities, the State has established the NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program. For additional information, check out the website.

You can learn about the specific plans being drawn up for the Southeast Brooklyn area, including the presentation and minutes from past meetings, here.

brass-rail

The Log Cabin, one of Sheepshead Bay’s oldest bars, has slashed its storefront in half and is now going by the name The Brass Rail.

Established in 1987, the local staple at 2123 Avenue Z took up two storefronts on the corner of East 22nd Street for decades. But the owners reduced its footprint some time after Superstorm Sandy. That part, 2121 Avenue Z, is now leased by dentist Paul Markel.

The bar launched several new beer options on tap as well after years of being known to locals as the place with “several taps, all Bud.” They’ve also been doing a lot of themed events, including a pajama party, 80s party and, as seen in the photo above, a Thanksgiving Eve Party coming up in two weeks. Unfortunately, it was also one of the last bars in Sheepshead Bay with a pool table – and that is now, sadly, gone. The karaoke will go on, however, as indicated by the new line on their awning: “The Karaoke Spot”.

Best of luck to the new Brass Rail, as well as to Dr. Merkel!

suspects

Two men are wanted by the police for allegedly mugging an elderly man on Avenue U and Batchelder Street on Monday.

Cops say the men came up behind their 83-year-old victim at approximately 5:10pm on November 10. One grabbed the victim and placed his hand over his mouth. The other rifled through his pockets, snatching $400. The two then ran off.

Thankfully, the victim was not harmed during the incident.

Cops are turning to the public in their search for the suspects, sharing photos from a surveillance camera that filmed them entering a building. They’re described as two black men in their late teens or early twenties.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477).  The public can also submit tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

Photo by Albert Dashevsky

Photo by Albert Dashevsky

Photo by Albert Dashevsky

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.