Source: Wikimedia Commons

Reader Mike N. wrote to point out what he believes is a waste of NYPD resources: catching fare-beaters on the Voorhies Avenue side of the Sheepshead Bay subway station.

Do you know that since the token booth, which became a non-selling booth, was removed from the Shore Parkway entrance, police stand at the other entrance watching the TV monitors, and when someone jumps a turnstile (no high gates here) they then walk up to the platform and surprise them with a ticket.

Often there are two to three officers watching at one time. Yes, it’s a violation to avoid a fare, but wouldn’t it be more prudent to put gate-style turnstiles that can’t be jumped at all unattended stations?

This would 100% solve the fare avoidance problem…however, it would stop the sweet flow of $105 tickets into the MTA coffers. And why are there no policemen ever stationed at the unattended turnstiles? Wouldn’t it make more sense for public safety to have officers where the ‘eyes and ears’ of the booth clerks are absent? (I know…the booth clerks aren’t much help).

Briefly, rather than the practical use of officers to guard an unwatched, potentially dangerous entry (I do understand that they technically are watching, but nobody sees them, so they do not deter crime), the officers are used to generate revenue.

It doesn’t sound like Mike believes the problem is going after fare beaters – who should be caught for stealing from all taxpayers. But he thinks the problem can be solved more easily and those NYPD resources redeployed for something more useful. What do you think?

Is there an issue you’d like to sound off about, or a problem you want to shed light on? E-mail editor [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com and we’ll consider publishing it!

Sea Park Apartments (Source: Google Maps)

Sea Park Apartments (Source: Google Maps)

Cops are investigating an apparent homicide in Coney Island, in which a 23-year-old man was found shot once in the head.

The grisly scene unfolded at the Sea Park Apartments at 2980 West 28th Street just after 8:00pm. Cops arrived to find the victim’s body in the hallway of the 17th floor.

The NYPD is not releasing the victim’s name, pending family notification.

They are still investigating, and no arrests have been made.

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, a member of the Assembly's Health Committee, greets participants during his annual health fair. Source: Cymbrowitz's Office

Source: Cymbrowitz’s Office

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz is hosting a free Cholesterol, Glucose, and Blood Pressure Screening at his district office, 1800 Sheepshead Bay Road between Emmons Avenue and Shore Parkway, this Friday, September 5 from 10:00am to 1:00pm

Appointments are required.

Cymbrowitz, a member of the Assembly’s Health Committee, is co-sponsoring the event with Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn Medical Center.

For more information, or to make an appointment, call Cymbrowitz’ office at (718) 743-4078.

Photo by Albert Dashevsky (a.k.a. Albert718)

Photo by Albert Dashevsky (a.k.a. Albert718)

Our venerable publisher said it was perfectly fine to publish this photo as is. If it’s alright for David, then it’s alright for Biggie.

Photo by Albert Dashevsky (a.k.a. Albert718)

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send them to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

school classroom by Dan Nguyen

Source: Dan Nguyen/Flickr

Sure, public schools open tomorrow. But maybe you’re a last minute kind of person – or one of any number of things got in the way – and you still need to get your kid registered for school, pre-k or free lunch.

Fortunately, the Department of Education is making things a little easier with new temporary registration centers spread across the five boroughs to make it easier to enroll students or get questions answered. And they’ve launched online tools to apply for free lunch (deadline tomorrow) and pre-k.

As for the temporary registration centers, not everybody needs to head to one. New elementary and middle school students who have zoned schools, including those with an Individualized Education Program, should register at their zoned school beginning tomorrow, September 4. You can find your zoned school here or by calling 311.

Registration centers are for those who live in a neighborhood without a zoned school, as well as all new high school students (including those with an IEP).

There are three Brooklyn registration centers:

  • Edward R. Murrow High School, 1600 Avenue L
  • Clara Barton High School, 901 Classon Avenue
  • Brooklyn Technical High School, 29 Fort Green Place

The centers are open from now through Friday, September 12, 2014 from 8:00am to 3:00pm.

Here’s the information from the DOE on what to bring:

Parents must bring their child(ren) with them to register. The following documents are required:

  • Child’s birth certificate or passport
  • Child’s immunization records
  • Child’s latest report card/transcript (if available)
  • Child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) and/or 504 Accommodation Plan (if applicable)

In addition, parents must demonstrate proof of residency by bringing any of the following two documents*:

  • Utility bill in the resident’s name (National Grid, Con Edison, or the Long Island Power Authority); must be dated within the past 60 days
  • Water bill for the residence; must be dated within the past 90 days
  • Original lease agreement, deed, or mortgage statement for the residence
  • Current property tax bill for the residence
  • Official payroll document from an employer [example: payroll receipt]; must be dated within the past 60 days
  • Document or letter from a federal, state, or local government agency indicating the resident’s name and address [example: document from Internal Revenue Service (IRS), City Housing Authority, the Administration for Children’s Services (ACS)]; must be dated within the past 60 days

* If the parent is not the leaseholder of residence, he/she must submit a Residency Affidavit.

Families can still register for universal pre-k and can find more information at nyc.gov/prek or by texting “prek” to 877877.

Aside from getting registered, the Department of Education is also making it easier to get enrolled in the free meals program.

Breakfast is at no charge to all students, while lunch normally costs $1.75. Some students qualify for free meals - but the application must be in before tomorrow, September 4, the start of school. You can apply online here. If you have any questions, please contact The Office of SchoolFood at (877) 363-6325.

belot

The Department of Transportation announced this morning that the Belt Parkway lane closures set to begin last night have been postponed indefinitely.

Two lanes of the eastbound Belt Parkway at Gerritsen Inlet Bridge were set to be closed for road repairs beginning last night and continuing through the weekend. A representative for the agency could not say what caused the postponement or when would would occur.

These closures are being done to facilitate the replacement of the bridge, which is part of the city’s Seven Bridges project, a large-scale renovation of seven spans on the Belt Parkway that began in 2009.

camera-1

Neighbors are crying foul over what appears to be a high-tech speed trap, after learning that the Department of Transportation placed a speed enforcement camera where they say speeding is unavoidable.

The camera is placed adjacent to Lincoln High School on Shore Parkway, between West Avenue and Ocean Parkway. It’s perched just above where the Belt Parkway exit ramp leads into the service road – catching drivers while they’re still decelerating from highway speeds.

“This camera seems to be conveniently placed so close to the exit ramp that you are almost guaranteed to set off this speed trap,” said neighbor Connie C., who was shocked to find a $50 ticket in the mail for a July 22 drive past the location. “[It's] positioned right in between the exit ramp and the entrance ramp, so basically they have you either way. As you are accelerating to get onto the ramp to enter the highway or coming off the highway at 50mph. I thought is seemed quite fishy.”

(UPDATE [September 4, 2014]: The DOT will not relocate the camera. Read that story here.)

Approximate location of the camera, between the exit and entrance ramps. (Source: Google Maps)

Approximate location of the camera, between the exit and entrance ramps. (Source: Google Maps)

Connie, who said she generally supports the use of speed cameras, isn’t the only neighbor to notice. Councilman Mark Treyger’s office said they’ve received numerous complaints and the pol is outraged at the apparent money grab.

“The role of speed cameras is to reduce speeding and increase safety in appropriate locations around our neighborhood. They should not be placed in locations like the start of an exit ramp because this ‘gotcha’ location plays into fears of many that these cameras are solely revenue generating machines,” said Treyger.

The pol is urging the DOT to move the camera closer to Ocean Parkway, where they’ll have more time to slow down after exiting the highway.

“Speed cameras can have an important role to play in our efforts to eliminate fatalities on city streets, but placing them in highly questionable locations threatens to undermine this program’s credibility,” he said.

Per a report this week, there are 23 active speed cameras operating near school intersections. They’ve issued 183,000 tickets since the first cameras came online in January. That number is about to skyrocket to 140 total speed cameras after Albany approved the expansion earlier this year.

The Department of Transportation did not return a request for comment on this article. The DOT said they will not move the camera, as the 400-foot-long ramp provides enough room to slow down safely.

Photo by Allan Rosen

Photo by Allan Rosen

THE COMMUTE: Street signage is as old as New York, first appearing on the sides of buildings, usually in white letters on a dark blue background. It also appeared early on in rural areas at intersections atop a small pole in a crisscross fashion in white on blue or with black lettering on a white background. All signs were in uppercase block letters and were meant to be easily read by pedestrians and by drivers and passengers in slow-moving or stopped vehicles.

The signs affixed to the buildings were gradually replaced by signs on poles, placed at right angles in heavily populated areas. (That probably explains how the Gravesend sign in the lead picture escaped DOT’s eye in 1970.) As more vehicles used the roadways, more signs were affixed to the taller street lights to be more easily seen from larger vehicles such as trucks and buses.

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, some street signs also displayed the street name you were on in a little oval above the name of the intersecting street. Some cities also showed the address numbers on the block under the street name. That never really caught on in New York City.

Continue Reading »

robbery

Cops say the man in the photo above attacked and robbed an 80-year-old woman and left her injured in the streets.

The man approached his victim from behind in Coney Island and violently grabbed at her purse, authorities say. She was knocked to the ground and left with minor injuries, while he fled.

The suspect was last seen wearing a grey tank top, dark pants, black du-rag and carrying a dark colored backpack.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) and then entering TIP577.

Update (1:22 p.m.): We’ve learned that this incident actually happened on Bay 46th Street in Bath Beach – not Coney Island as we previously reported. The story has been amended.

Photo by Gabriel Gelman

Photo by Gabriel Gelman

Photo by Gabriel Gelman (on Instagram: @Gx2NY)

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send them to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.