The Thunderboltin 1995. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The Thunderbolt site, once home to the famed Coney Island roller coaster built in 1920, is now up for grabs.

Thunderbolt owner Horace Bullard has put it up for sale, following a failed attempt to cash in on the property last year. The former roller coaster was torn down in 2000 after being decommissioned in 1982.

Keep reading about the deal, and what it means for the amusement district.

The Manhattan Beach Neighborhood Association will hold a meeting tonight at 8 p.m. at P.S. 195, located on 131 Irwin Street.

THE COMMUTE: Bus service is the MTA’s job, but Kingsborough can assist the MTA in improving bus service by taking the following measures.

  1. Provide security officers to assist MTA dispatchers and bus drivers
  2. Inform the MTA every time there is a deviation in the school schedule
  3. Move the bus terminal from Mackenzie Street to inside college property

The MTA cannot do the job by itself. Here is why.

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Allan Rosen sent over the following suggestion over the weekend:

Gas prices are on the minds of a lot of people.   How about asking people what they think is behind the dramatic rise in gasoline and home heating oil prices.  Gas companies are making record profits. Are prices being manipulated?  Are gas companies in collusion with one another? Can and should government step in and what can they do?  Is there a shortage? Will gas prices reach $5 a gallon by this summer or sooner?  Will prices drop again and if so why?

Rosen is right – people are concerned about rising gas prices. But I’m not so interested in hearing conspiracy theories about the cause of the inflation, or speculation about what happens next. My question is simpler and closer to home: how has the rising cost of oil affected you? How are you coping with it? Are you finding ways to keep costs down? Care to share, and help your neighbors out?

Source: NYC Mayor's Office

Even the luck of the Irish couldn’t help Mayor Bloomberg.

Mayor Bloomberg visited Rockaway, Queens, on Saturday to march in their annual St. Patrick’s Day parade, but hizzonah was not welcomed warmly. According to the New York Post, the crowd shouted “Go back to Manhattan!” and “Take the A train home!” as he marched the 30-block route.

Residents were more than a little ticked off at the mayor’s recent spate of initiatives that aren’t holding much water outside of Manhattan, especially in middle-class residential strongholds. And, in true old-school New York fashion, the folks in the Rockaways gave Bloomberg their unvarnished opinions on everything from teacher and FDNY layoffs (they chanted “Union buster” as he marched) to the latest anti-smoking bill.

“What he’s doing to our teachers and our Fire Department – it’s shameful,” said one parade attendee. “Who cares about bike lanes? He’s an idiot.”

According to the Post, Bloomberg didn’t stick around to play nice with the revelers. He and his entourage drove off as soon as he finished the parade route.

As a Brooklynite, it can be a little hard to praise Queens on a job well done. But on this one, the enemy of our enemy is our friend. Kudos to you, Queenies, for keepin’ it real and giving Bloomberg the kind of welcome he’s earned.

[via Gothamist]

Photo by Laura Fernandez.

Brighton Beach in 1901, when people were wearing too much. That’s the direct opposite of what you see today on the beach, where people are wearing too little.

And did you know that the beach once included a sign that read, “Neither indecent bathing suits nor immodest deportment will be tolerated.” (You can see this sign better when clicking the link and then clicking on ‘view hi-def image.’)

Imagine if that sign still stood today?

This one's for Kon. (Source: Gary Wong/Flickr)

If you don’t remember, a reader previously suggested that the B train remain local after construction is completed. As expected, since we now have two trains running local on the same track, most of us didn’t agree and were not afraid to voice our opinions against it.

So, the reader, named Auxil, turned to Transit Sam for his thoughts on the manner.

Basically, he told Transit Sam the way he saw it – that there were now two trains making making the same stops, therefore picking up more people as a result of the more frequent service.

Transit Sam politely responded, making some important points why Auxil’s idea was a bad one. One point Transit Sam made was that the riders south of Prospect Park (such as us), sit through more dreadful stops on a local B than the express B that we all know and loved (Well, that MOST of us loved, right Auxil?).

According to Transit Sam, “running the B as a local adds about 12 minutes to the commute from Brighton Beach to Prospect Park and according to NYC Transit, it would also cost more to operate.”

As for Auxil’s belief that there’s more frequent service if there’s two trains running local, well that’s practically a myth. Transit Sam says that waiting for Q after a local B is only a minute less than when the B ran express.

Transit Sam ended his response with an interesting statement- “The Brighton Line is more attractive to customers because it has four tracks and enough riders to fill express trains — a combination enjoyed nowhere else in the country.”

Yet one of the many reasons we need our express B train back. Oh, how it’s been so long…

Click to enlarge

CompStat reports are produced by the New York Police Department on a weekly basis. We summarize the week’s statistics for the 61st Precinct reports every Friday. The 61st Precinct is the police command responsible for Sheepshead Bay, Gravesend, Kings Highway, Homecrest, Madison, Manhattan Beach, and Gerritsen Beach.

Source: Jhawk/Flickr

 

The poor state of our economy doesn’t discriminate – it could hurt our senior citizens next.

Seven local senior centers are in danger of closing as part of system-wide cuts that’ll see 105 centers shuttered across all five boroughs, and 31 in Brooklyn.

Find out which local centers, and why the cuts are likely to go through.