The following flier was sent to us from the Brooklyn Streetcar Artists Group and the Independent Committee at Coney Island Hospital:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Got a housing problem, either as a homeowner or as a renter? Brooklyn Housing and Family Services is the borough’s largest organization to help those in need to protect their property, their rights, their quality of life, and their finances.

Check out this one-on-one housing clinic at Coney Island Hospital at 2601 Ocean Parkway, at 3:30 p.m. and get informed!

Steven Cymbrowitz (l.) and Ben Akselrod (r.)

Conservative Democrat Ben Akselrod appears to be launching his second attempt to unseat incumbent Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, recently filing papers with the state to form a campaign committee.

Akselrod mounted his first challenge to Cymbrowitz in 2012, rising from relative obscurity to a credible candidate with the assistance of his close friend Ari Kagan. Akselrod came close to defeating Cymbrowitz in the Democratic primary, coming less than 300 votes shy of victory. He continued on to the general election on the Independence line, making it a three-way race with Republican Russ Gallo. Cymbrowitz won the general with a wide margin.

Akselrod and his supporters led a hard-knuckled campaign, in which the incumbent was criticized for not opposing a mosque just outside of his district, voting for a bill that encouraged tolerance education in schools including tolerance of homosexuals, and, just days before the primary election, marrying a woman who is not Jewish.

The race brought citywide media attention after Akselrod’s campaign released a flier with a typo claiming that the assemblyman “allowed crime to go up over 50% in the negrohood,” a claim that was factually incorrect regardless of the typo.

Cymbrowitz stayed mum for most of the campaign, leading one outlet to say he was running a “gentleman’s campaign,” but eventually spoke out against “vicious” tactics two weeks after the primary.

Although it’s widely expected, it’s still not fully clear whether Akselrod will run this year. Because of illness, he did not attend last night’s meeting of the Bay Democrats, the club where he serves as president and where he is likely to announce.

District Leader Ari Kagan, a close friend and adviser to Akselrod, told Sheepshead Bites that the papers were simply the first steps to forming an “exploratory committee” to determine whether Akselrod will run.

“He told me it’s an exploratory committee. When he decides 100 percent, he’ll have a big kickoff. Like in May, when the weather is nice,” said Kagan.

Akselrod, however, sounded very much like a candidate in an interview yesterday with Politicker, which first reported on the campaign filings.

“I certainly hope to win. Look, the status quo can’t continue forever. I think I have more energy, more desire to do the job,” Akselrod told Politicker. “There are still many problems with Hurricane Sandy recovery … It’s a year and a half later and we’re still talking about things that should have been done 15 days after the storm hit.”

Akselrod did not return a request to comment in time for publication. We’ll update this post if we here back from him.

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Need a beach home for your family? And your brother’s family? A couple of cousins, maybe a neighbor and an old college buddy? And still have a room to spare for the help?

Fortunately, there’s a home in Seagate on the market that’s got you covered. A 7,989-square-foot two-story mansion hit the market last week, sporting 11 bedrooms, 11 full bathrooms and a “south facing beach exposure [that] provides unparalleled experience from sunrise to sunset where every moment is different and unique.” Uhuh. And here I thought once you’ve seen one sunrise, you’ve seen ‘em all.

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Anyway, the property is at 4050 Atlantic Avenue – the ocean facing street that saw several homes obliterated during Superstorm Sandy. But according to the broker, the “outdoor living season is long and mild.” Nevermind the superstorms. We can’t imagine why the current owners are heading for the hills.

Some of the neater amenities include three wood-burning fireplaces, an ocean-facing deck, a penthouse master suite, and a “library/music room with Philippines Mohagany wood paneling.” Also: rooftop gardens.

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There’s no mention of Superstorm Sandy or flood damage at all – and, really, who would put that in a real estate post. In fact, they even omit the tell-tale “newly renovated” boast that pervades every Zone A listing we’ve seen. Oh, but wait, there is a hint: “This property is equipped with massive new mechanicals: Two Weil McLain furnaces, one with hot water circulating system and one with steam, two huge Smith boilers and a new electric system.”

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Still, pretty property and a relatively low asking price. Would you buy a home this close to the water in the post-Sandy age?

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[via Curbed]

Photo by Vlad Slobodkin

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send them to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Chase Bank at 1500 Coney Island Ave (Source: Google Maps)

Chase Bank at 2500 Coney Island Ave (Source: Google Maps)

A 7,200-square-foot retail property, currently home to a Chase Bank and cellphone repair store, has sold to new owners for $5.425 million.

The property sits at 2500 Coney Island Avenue, on the corner of Avenue V. It’s a two-story building with a 12,000 square foot parking lot.

The owners could choose to redevelop the site, building taller while staying within zoning laws, but the Observer, which reported on the deal, notes that it is “unlikely.”

The new owner is Francman Realty LLC, a New Jersey-based company.

Carmine Carro Community Center

The next meeting of the Madison-Marine-Homecrest Civic Association will be this Thursday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m. inside the Carmine Carro Community Center in Marine Park, Fillmore Avenue at Marine Parkway.

The meeting will feature a presentation by Lt. Anthony Mancuso, director of Fire Safety Education for the Fire Department of New York (FDNY). He will also introduce a special program for seniors.

Local elected officials and representatives from the 61st Precinct will be on hand to give updates on what is happening in the community.

To learn more, call (718) 375-9158 or email coachedj@aol.com.

A 2012 collision on Bedford Avenue and Emmons Avenue, which neighbors say is a common occurrence. (Photo: Tom Paolillo)

The New York Police Department has been busy this year. In February, the number of tickets issued across the city for traffic violations have gone up. But things look different in our local 61st Precinct, which covers Sheepshead Bay, Gravesend, Kings Highway, Homecrest, Madison, Manhattan Beach and Gerritsen Beach.

In this area there has been no increase or decrease in the number of tickets drivers received in February 2014 when compared to the number issued in February 2013, according to an analysis of the NYPD’s data by WNYC. It has stayed a consistent 65, while most precincts in the city have seen drastic increases during the first month of Vision Zero policy implementation.

Bay Ridge’s 68th Precinct, for example, shot up 169 percent. Bed-Stuy’s 79th Precinct increased a whopping 322 percent.

According to a WNYC analysis, the increase is due to the fact that “most precincts stepped up enforcement of speeding, failure to yield to pedestrians, and failure to stop at traffic signals.” The ramped up enforcement is part of the policy implementation of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Vision Zero plan, which aims to reduce traffic-related fatalities. As part of the plan, officers are called on to increase enforcement against the most dangerous kinds of violations.

In February 2014, the NYPD reported 220 collisions in the 61st Precinct. There was only one fatality, a man who was struck and killed by a private plow in front of the Oceana complex in Brighton Beach.

In a new community newsletter to be produced monthly by the 61st Precinct, the local command announced that traffic enforcement would ramp up in the neighborhood, with a particular focus on locations with a history of pedestrian-related accidents.

They wrote:

In accordance with Mayor De Blasio’s “Vision Zero” campaign, one of the top priorities of the New York City Police Department is to reduce injuries and deaths resulting from motor vehicle collisions. Officers on patrol will focus enforcement related to keeping pedestrians and motorists safe by issuing summonses that include the failure to stop at stop signs and red lights, as well as the failure to yield to pedestrians.

Our current top pedestrian related collision location is the intersection of Coney Island Avenue and Avenue Z. Our partnership with the community includes sharing vital information so that our friends, family and neighbors will remain safe.

randazzos

THE BITE: Here on Sheepshead Bites, we’ve covered some of the recovery of Randazzo’s Clam Bar (2017 Emmons Avenue) after Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc on the long-standing waterfront spot in October 2012. Despite heavy damage, they managed to reopen within months, which was a great source of comfort for a lot of Sheepshead businesses and locals. They are fully up and running, and serving up the seafood and Italian dishes they’ve been known for over the past several decades.

As we’ve mentioned in a previous article, Randazzo’s wasn’t always the only game in town. Joe’s Clam Bar and Rubino’s Crab House each occupied a plot on Emmons Avenue, and Lundy’s was an imposing presence in it’s heyday. But Randazzo’s is the last man standing when it comes to Italian seafood, with many of its competitors replaced by Greek, Turkish and Eastern European takes on the ocean’s catch.

Randazzo’s began in 1916 as a fish market with a small counter for quick and easy food. In the 1960s, a clam bar was added and Helen Randazzo, daughter of the fisherman founder, began making her famous red sauce in medium or hot. A larger cafeteria opened next, and pastas and more robust Italian dishes were put on the menu. Ultimately, the fish market closed and the cafeteria and clam bar consolidated, evolving into the restaurant we know today. Still a family-owned operation, Helen’s grand- and great-grandchildren now run the place.

Feeling the need to order clams and sauce to properly pay my respects to this long history, I got the red Zuppa di Clams for $18.95.

The soup arrived in an enormous round white plate, steam curling off the bright red sauce that shimmered golden with olive oil. About a dozen clams lay open at odd angles in the dish, and with just a little coercing I pulled the meat out of the shells with my fork. They were soft, slightly chewy, and very fresh, going great with spoonfuls of that oregano-spiked sauce. I asked for the hot, which wasn’t extremely spicy, but did have a little kick. A hunk of hard, white Italian bread was served alongside with butter. But with a plateful of sauce like that, who needs butter?

If you’ve come to Randazzo’s, I’d venture to say you either came for the fresh seafood, or for the famous red sauce. If you can’t decide which you’ve come for, then get both – you have plenty of options that combine the two at “The Pride of Sheepshead Bay.”

Randazzo’s Clam Bar, 2017 Emmons Avenue, (718) 615-0010.

– Sonia Rapaport

The Bite is Sheepshead Bites’ weekly column where we explore the foodstuffs of Sheepshead Bay. Each week we check out a different offering from one of the many restaurants, delis, food carts, bakeries, butchers, fish mongers, or grocers in our neighborhood. If it’s edible, we’ll take a bite.

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Early morning Q train commuters received an unexpected jolt after a driver lost control of an SUV, crashed through a fence and landed on top of a Q train between Church Avenue and Beverley Road, causing delays along the Brighton line.

DNAinfo reports:

The south-bound Q train had just left the Church Avenue station about 5 a.m. when the woman plowed through a fence near Albemarle Road and East 16th Street, creating a kind of ramp that allowed her to settle her front tires atop the train, according to an NYPD spokesman and a witness.

The woman who was behind the wheel walked away from the incident and still hasn’t been found, the police spokesman said.

A Twitter user, BKSHOSHANNAH, captured the aftermath on camera,which we posted above.

No injuries were reported, and a rescue train was dispatched to transfer approximately 50 commuters back to the Church Avenue train station. The SUV was removed by approximately 9:30 a.m. Fencing was being pulled from the track until just before noon.

As a result of the accident, southbound Q trains ran express from Prospect Park to Kings Highway, with the MTA notifications crediting it to a “stalled train.”

Minutes before noon, the MTA website and Twitter feed announced that local service has resumed with delays.

Here are a few more photos from the MTA’s NYCTSubwayScoop feed:

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Atlas on NY1

Atlas on NY1

At this point, just about every resident of Southern Brooklyn’s boardwalk communities knows Gary Atlas – if not by name, then by sight.

He’s the guy you see out there every morning, regardless of the weather, running shirtless and in thin shorts before taking a plunge in the ocean.

He’s done this every day for 2,369 consecutive days – or six years and counting.

NY1 caught up with him earlier this month, spotlighting his continuous effort to hit 4,000 consecutive runs even throughout this particularly nasty winter.

As workers with the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation spreaded salt on the latest dusting of snow Monday, Gary Atlas emerged from his building shirtless and ready to run. About his only acknowledgment of the cold was the socks that he wears on his hands.

“The fingers tend to freeze up, so socks work better than gloves,” he said. “Gloves, after a while, my fingers will get cold. Socks has a mitten effect. The hands stay warmer.”

The cold itself hasn’t been bothering Atlas, it’s the snow, which makes the six-mile treck a particularly difficult slog. But he handled the worst of the days by detouring to the streets and running in the plow’s wake – the second time in seven years he’s had to leave the boardwalk.

Atlas began the routine in 2007 to clear his mind while his mother struggled with health issues. He continues to do it to honor his mother.

“While I’m running, it keeps the memory of my mother alive,” he says. “She was here when I started, and she’s still with me on every run.”

Check out the full profile here.

And, of course, we’ve had our own little Atlas sighting on Sheepshead Bites. On the morning of October 29, 2012, as Superstorm Sandy lapped at our coastline, a reader snapped this shot of him emerging from the rough waters: