Archive for the 'Arts & Culture' Category

Photo by Roman Kruglov / Roman.K Photography

Photo by Roman Kruglov / Roman.K Photography

Photo by Roman Kruglov / Roman.K Photography

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Photo by Randy Contello | RandyCPhotography

Photo by Randy Contello | RandyCPhotography

Photo by Randy Contello | RandyCPhotography

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Photo by Lisa

Photo by Lisa

Photo by Lisa

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Photo by Mary Bakija

Photo by Mary Bakija

Sea glass found on Brighton Beach.

Photo by Mary Bakija

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Photo by Randy Contello | RandyCPhotography

Photo by Randy Contello | RandyCPhotography

Photo by Randy Contello | RandyCPhotography

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

 
Maybe not today or tomorrow, but it’s definitely on its way.

Photo by Roman Kruglov / Roman.K Photography

Photo by JoAnn Russo

Photo by JoAnn Russo

It really does kind of look like one.

Photo by JoAnn Russo

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Photo by Robin Michals

Photo by Robin Michals

Photo by Robin Michals

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

AndrewDiceClayOfficial.com

AndrewDiceClayOfficial.com

On the eve of the release of his new memoir, Sheepshead Bay native Andrew Dice Clay sat down with the Village Voice and recounted how he got his start in comedy.

The foul-mouthed comedian never intended to be a funnyman; he was a theater geek aiming to be an actor. But to warm up to the stage, he decided to tackle what he called “the toughest club in the country” – Sheepshead Bay’s Pips Comedy Club, formerly on Emmons Avenue.

Here’s what he said about the 1978 experience, and how it led Andrew Silverstein to become the Diceman:

That night would change my life. September 13, 1978. When I went on for the first time at Pips, that became my home until I came out to L.A. But I was very prepared to go on at Pips because I came up as a musician, as a drummer, and singer and entertainer. I was more into theater, so when I was thinking about getting on a comedy stage, it was more about having an act already. I didn’t want to “go up there and see what happens,” and I prepared a certain kind of act. I would come onstage as Jerry Lewis’s character from The Nutty Professor and take my magic formula, and turn into the John Travolta character from Grease.

At the time, Travolta was just the biggest star in the world. I mean, he was coming off the heels of [Saturday Night] Fever. We’d resembled each other since he was in Welcome Back, Kotter. We really looked similar; I could do a dead-on Travolta. But when I saw Grease at the Brighton theater in Brighton Beach and I saw him sing and dance, I said, “I have the act. I know what I can do.”

To perfect the act, Dice rehearsed at Kings Highway’s Fly Studios, then watched Grease and Fever over and over again, jotting down notes on the dance cues. He continues:

And that night when I went on at Pips, I came onstage as Jerry Lewis. My whole family was there: my parents, my sister, my grandmother, my friend Johnny. It was amateur night, and when I went on as the Nutty Professor, they’re booing me because I’m this nerd: “Get the fuck off the stage!”

But the club owner knew when to shut the light when I was doing my transition, took my magic formula. When I turned around as Travolta, they went ballistic, like it was Travolta. They were throwing tables over. You talk about a 90-seat club, with the air conditioning right in the ceiling: the toughest club in the country to play. When that would click on it was like a tractor going on. And I got hired to headline that weekend. The owners come over and they go, “Who’s your manager?” I look over at my father and go, “He is.” And that was it. I never came offstage for 10 years, until I made it.

Apparently, the comedian, who will also play a ’70s radio-station magnate in an upcoming Martin Scorsese series for HBO, feels Brooklyn is even worse than the bad, old days of the 1970s.

Brooklyn was a different world back then, and today it’s even worse. ‘Cause today it’s more bullies. That’s all you read about. And I always hated bullies. I wasn’t a bully in any way. I was tough, I could fight, but I wasn’t with the 15 guys coming over to one guy to terrorize him and kick him in the face. I hate that attitude.

Anyone remember Dice from the old ‘hood? Tell us about his performances at Pips!

Source: Youtube/Global Ambassador NYC

Source: Youtube/Global Ambassador NYC

Oh, Taylor. First you released that terrible, terrible single about our beloved city. Then we learned that it was just a publicity stunt for your new role as the “Global Welcome Ambassador” for New York City’s tourism department.

Well, some folks are not impressed with Taylor Swift’s shiny informational videos (such as this Tribeca-centric NYC vocabulary lesson). In a hilarious parody site (with a perfect domain: www.globalambassador.nyc), three native New Yorkers give the singer some pointers about what New York is really about.

“Brooklyn is not a bunch of bearded hipsters eating kale salad. It’s just good, working-class people in a lot of places,” Paul Bomba, 35, the writer and producer behind the site, told us. “I think Taylor Swift was chosen as a symbol of gentrification.”

Bomba, who grew up in Gravesend, was shocked when he learned that Swift was selected as Welcome Ambassador. So he decided to do something about it. He registered the NYC domain name and put out a casting call for native-born New York actors.

Queens-born Tommy Ray and Inwood-native Brianne Berkson responded, and last week the trio shot three videos on the rooftop of a Bushwick apartment building. Within days, Bomba had edited the footage and loaded them onto the site.

Bomba says his goal is to make people laugh and highlight the ridiculousness of the city’s choice of Swift.

“I just don’t think she gets it yet,” said Bomba. “Yes, New York City has more millionaires than any other city in the U.S. At the same time, there are eight million other people who don’t just show up in New York and can buy whatever apartment they want.”

“I’ve been here my entire life and I still have a lot to learn about the city,” he added.

Bomba has no hard feelings towards Swift, though.

“If she reaches out to me, I’d love to meet her and take her out for a slice of pizza at L&B Spumoni Gardens,” he said.

h/t Village Voice

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