A DOT speed-enforcement camera sits at this location, fining people who fail to slow down after exiting the highway. (Source: Google Maps)

A DOT speed-enforcement camera sits at this location, fining people who fail to slow down after exiting the highway. (Source: Google Maps)

While opponents of a camera-enforced speed trap on a Belt Parkway exit ramp cry foul, the Department of Transportation says “tough luck.”

The agency said it has no plans to move the speed enforcement camera placed on Shore Parkway at the end of the highway’s Ocean Parkway exit ramp, despite complaints from neighbors and a local City Council member that it’s unfair and undermines the program’s credibility.

A spokesperson for DOT would not confirm the placement of the camera, saying it’s the agency’s policy not to disclose camera locations. However, the spokesperson added that there are no plans to relocate any cameras in Southern Brooklyn.

Moreover, the spokesperson disputed the assertion that it’s a “gotcha” location, noting that the ramp is approximately 400 feet long, enough distance to slow down from highway speeds, and that a sign has been placed indicating that the speed limit is 30 miles per hour.

Violations are not issued to motorists going 10 miles or less over the speed limit, the spokesperson added.

That answer isn’t good enough, said Councilman Mark Treyger. The pol’s office has been flooded with complaints from ticket recipients and yesterday he called on the agency to move the camera closer to Ocean Parkway.

“I don’t think that [the DOT] even addressed my concern. No residents asked them to measure the length of the exit ramp,” said Treyger. “We didn’t ask them to measure how long it is. We asked them, in the interest of public safety, to move it where pedestrians are actually using [a crosswalk].”

Treyger said he’s going to appeal to the agency to reconsider the location. His office will also begin notifying residents to be aware of the camera.

The councilman, a former school teacher, said the placement of the camera does little to protect students at nearby Lincoln High School or other pedestrians, since it’s not placed near a pedestrian crosswalk.

“To my knowledge I don’t believe any pedestrians are crossing near exit ramps for highways,” Treyger said. There is no sidewalk on the highway side of Shore Parkway where the camera is placed.

By moving it just a few hundred feet up the block to the Ocean Parkway intersection, they can catch motorists who are speeding through crosswalks. The current placement instead has the appearance of enforcement for revenue-generating purposes, the pol suggested.

“The goal of the speed cameras is to protect public safety and make sure people are abiding by laws. But when you place them in these ‘gotcha’ locations it really threatens to undermine the credibility of this program. We want to save lives, but ‘gotcha’ locations in my opinion don’t accomplish that goal,” he said.

Clarification (3:00 p.m.): The camera itself is in Councilman Chaim Deutsch’s district, not Treyger’s – although many affected by it are in Treyger’s district. We are reaching out to Deutsch’s office as well.

Related posts

  • Pingback: Sheepshead Bites » Blog Archive Locals Say Speed Camera Placed At Belt Parkway Exit Ramp Is Unfair » Sheepshead Bay News Blog

  • Criminals_Cops_Law_Makers

    People observe cars who drive with plate covers in order to obstruct view from cameras…..99% are the people off duty criminals like cops and city officials. Its easy to tell. You just need to be liile bit observant…..I hate when these criminals and their supporters preach moral to me

    • JoCKy

      you should also observe how they bastards use their “official” orange EZ passes and put them on their personal cars. (for those that dont know, Orange colored EZ-passes are paid by city agencies.

      • Criminals_Cops_Law_Makers

        Jocky
        thank you very much yes I know that and thank you for speaking out……average day people not stupid it just we are willing to blame each other for non sense meanwhile savages who benefit the most and steal the most are people who also harass and extort from us…..but crowd on this blog will preach morals to me…..problem
        with all these observation its time consuming and money needs to be spend in order to report this abuse and self entitlement….I dont have time for it nor money to start this project….If someone wants to start this project I am willing to assist…

        Thank you for speaking out….I wish there were more people like you…

      • Horatio Caine, CSI

        I wonder how many moving violations you have racked up, and still think each time that you did nothing wrong, that you are the Victim? Ha Ha. I bet you think that nutty kid-murderer Franklin Reyes Jr (aka Dumbo Ears) is misunderstood and a victim of a corrupt political system. You should change your name to “JOKER”

        • Criminals_Cops_Law_Makers

          that was a very shallow response….because of people like you every year its get worse regarding corruption and harassment….are we all willing to give these people a free pass because they are above the law…I really don’t understand logic here, but lets make average people suffer from financial burden and unnecessary stress

          • Horatio Caine, CSI

            Criminal guy, actually I just read that nearly 40 state legislators have been either indicted or convicted in recent years, so nobody is denying rampant corruption.We all know there is a problem, but hey Gov.Cuomo will still get reelected, won’t he?

  • BrooklynBus

    School speed zone limits are 20 mph when school is in session or at arrival and dismissal times. That was the purpose of the cameras. Not to have them in effect at all times to catch people coming off a highway ramp in the back of a school where no one is crossing the street anyway. So at what speed is the camera avtivated? 10 mph above the school zone speed or 10 mph above th exit speed of 30 mph.

    I said all along once they get approval for the school cameras they will use them anyway they can to raise revenue and not to improve safety.

    • Arty

      This is not a school speed zone of 20mph, it’s the side/back of the school and there is no 20 sign posted near or anywhere before the camera. It is/should currently be catching people St 41+. Where they are playing games is that the recently passed law says for cameras to be in effect near schools (within 1/4 mile which covers almost all the streets of BK.) It’s not tied to 20mph school zones only proximity and times. Though people are saying they’re getting tickets off school times ( and presumably the hour before and after them)

    • Helen Smith

      It’s not even near the school though. I saw a pic and it’s in the middle of one of the REALLY long exit ramps. So you’re just starting to slow down at that point.

      • Andrew

        Actually, it’s on Shore Parkway, which is a city street with explicit 30 mph regulatory signage. If you’re just starting to slow down at that point, the cameras are there to let you know that you’re doing it wrong (and breaking the law).

        • Michael T

          I’m wondering if you even drive a car or is it possible you’re a DOT worker? Who do you think you are talking to people like that? Who made you the judge and jury on this subject? Where did you get your knowledge on these ” explicit regulations “? Thanks for all your input Mr. know it all…..

          • BrooklynBus

            Andrew is actually correct for the time being. The problem is that the speed limit on service roads should be 35 mph since there is no parking on one side of the road. Where there is a long stretch between intersections on both sides of the street like in this case, 40 mph would also be an acceptable speed limit which is why 85% of the drivers are probably going between 35 and 40 mph anyway.

            The problem is that instead of raising the speed limit to something reasonable, they will be lowering it to 25 mph as soon as they get around to install new signs. That means anyone going 36 mph (which is the current average speed) will be ticketed. Everyone will be forced to slow down at a point where no one is crossing the street anyway, between an exit ramp and an entrance ramp.

            Think how unfair this whole thing is when city officials promised that these cameras would only be installed in front of schools and would be in effect only during school hours to protect our precious little ones, then went ahead and quietly wrote language that permits these cameras to be in effect outside of school hours in about 25% of the city.

            When you drive notice next time how about every fourth intersection has a school crossing sign on the pavement. That is how many school zones there are.

          • Michael T

            Understood! At least you’re being fair and respectful about this. There’s 2 sides to every story. No one is perfect. The camera’s should be moved closer to the school with additional signs posted for a school zone before the exit or entrance ramp. Some will say this is a public street, but if you go by that area where the camera is ( it’s basically a highway), you won’t see 1 person crossing. No stores or buildings, just a highway! If it’s about safety for the school kids, put the camera’s where it will protect them. Scenario for someone that speeds: I just got by the ramp going 30 mph(passed the camera), now I can go back up to 40 or more when I’m getting closer to the school. This makes no sense. If it’s not about the money, and it’s not a speed trap, then they’ll make these changes and show us all that they really care! Furthermore, if you speed in a school zone that’s clearly depicted, then by all means issue a summons to that driver. Lets see what happens.

          • Andrew

            If the point is to persuade motorists to observe the speed limit at a small handful of locations and to drive as fast as they’d like everywhere else, then your idea is a good one.

            If the point is to persuade motorists to observe the speed limit everywhere, then the cameras should be deployed in as many locations as possible, and moved around periodically if fiscal or legislative constraints limit the number of cameras in use, to encourage motorists to treat every location as a potential camera site.

            Posting signs encourages motorists to slow down HERE as opposed to everywhere else. That’s not very helpful. There’s a strong culture of lawlessness among motorists, and one of the best ways to break that culture is to make motorists realize that there are real penalties for breaking the law.

            “No one is perfect” is exactly right. Our streets should not be set up so that a simple mistake on somebody’s part – the pedestrian’s or the motorist’s – results in the pedestrian’s death.

          • Michael T

            Hi Andrew, If you remember, these speeding tickets are given specifically because it’s supposedly a school zone. I didn’t make that up! So slowing down HERE will protect the children, school teachers and other staff! Isn’t that what we want in this situation? Your arguement of the ramp at this location being part of the street with intersections and lights is a questionable one. Sure the ramp is technically part of the streets, but 1200 feet away from the ramp ( in your own words) is the next intersection and lights! You’re showing yourself to be someone who is very biased towards drivers. Am I wrong?

          • Andrew

            Actually, these speeding tickets are being given because driver speed has been a primary factor in far too many pedestrian deaths, and the city is finally beginning to take the issue seriously. Unfortunately, the state has imposed some absurd restrictions on where and when automated speed enforcement can take place, but the goal was never to protect only students, teachers, and school staff.

            The ramp, which is about 450 feet long, is NOT a city street. It is a ramp. It connects the main Belt Parkway roadway to the service road, which IS a city street and which even has an explicitly posted 30 mph speed limit sign.
            I’m biased toward preserving the lives of pedestrians. I’m sorry if you find the speed limits too onerous to follow.

          • Andrew

            The 85th percentile guideline is a guideline for highways, where the objective is to reduce the likelihood of motor vehicles bumping into other motor vehicles. It simply does not apply in the context of city streets if the objective is to reduce the likelihood of motor vehicles bumping into pedestrians and to reduce the damage when they do so. Which is quite explicitly the objective of Vision Zero.

            You are throwing out exact numbers as recommendations as if you had any quantitative basis for them. Somebody might mistakenly think they’re based on something.

            I have no idea if this street in particular will be subject to the new default 25 mph limit, which goes into effect in November. If the current 30 mph signs remain posted, it will take precedence over the default limit.

            The point of lowering speeds is not only to protect pedestrians in a crosswalk. The point is to reduce the likelihood of serious injury or death when something goes wrong – when either the pedestrian or the driver makes a mistake. Too many pedestrians have been struck by drivers who have veered onto the sidewalk – reducing speeds will both lower the likelihood of that happening in the first place and lower the likelihood of death when it does.

          • Andrew

            I’m wondering if you even drive a car or is it possible you’re a DOT worker?

            I’ve driven hundreds of thousands of miles. I have up the car after I realized that I’d save considerable money (and time) without one, renting as needed. It’s one of the best decisions I ever made. (It’s obviously not the best decision for everyone – we all have different personal situations – but it’s something worth thinking about periodically.) So now I am a member of that elite group of non-car-owning households – all 50%+ of us.

            Sorry, not a DOT worker.

            Who do you think you are talking to people like that?

            Talking to people like what? Correcting them when they’re in error? Welcome to the Internet. I hope you will do the same for me when you realize that I’m in error.

            Who made you the judge and jury on this subject?

            Where am I being judge and jury? I’m simply explaining the facts.

            Where did you get your knowledge on these ” explicit regulations “?

            This is a pretty important issue to me, so I’ve been following its progress closely. Excuse me for trying to stay informed!

            Thanks for all your input Mr. know it all…..

            And thank you for the ad hominem! It really contributes to the discussion.

          • Michael T

            You’re in error!

          • BrooklynBus

            He will never admit an error or any bias, but will argue endlessly going around in circles. I have had plenty of experience.

          • Andrew

            Did you have a particular error in mind?

          • BrooklynBus

            I have pointed out several in the past. I will not repeat them again for fear of starting another three month conversation with you.

            You either sideswipe the issue or try to change the subject. It’s okay we all know you are infallible and extremely argumentative as evidenced by the question you asked since you can’t believe you ever made a single error in the past three years we have been conversing. It is always the other person who in your mind is always wrong.

            Now you will look up all our conversations and report back I was wrong because the first conversation was two years and nine months ago, not three years. I am a little tired of your pettiness.

          • Andrew

            I have pointed out several in the past. I will not repeat them again for fear of starting another three month conversation with you.

            So the answer is “no.”

            You either sideswipe the issue or try to change the subject. It’s okay we all know you are infallible and extremely argumentative as evidenced by the question you asked since you can’t believe you ever made a single error in the past three years we have been conversing. It is always the other person who in your mind is always wrong.

            I’m sorry? I make mistakes all the time. I’m human, and I’ve never claimed otherwise. I do, however, try to avoid them, for instance by verifying my claims before posting them.

            I suppose that people who prefer to rely on gut feeling and speculation alone may get nervous when I try to verify my claims. So be it.

            Now you will look up all our conversations and report back I was wrong because the first conversation was two years and nine months ago, not three years. I am a little tired of your pettiness.

            You’re not worth the time or trouble.

          • Matt

            Actually,when the whole 25 mph speed limit vision zero proposal came out there was an article in one of the papers that pointed out that according to the DOT stats vehicle speed was 10th on a list of factors for vehicle related pedestrian injuries and fatalities..

          • Andrew

            Did you have something specific in mind?

          • BrooklynBus

            You are forgetting one thing. Approval for these cameras was given with the understanding they woud be placed near schools where children are crossing during arrival and dismissal periods. That’s why we have school zones that are in effect 7 to 9 AM and 2 to 4 PM with a clear school zone sign and flashing yellow lights when the school zone is in effect. An example is Avenue Z near Coney Island Avenue. That’s where people in favor of these cameras expected these cameras to be placed.

            I have no problem with that. I was opposed to the cameras because I knew the city woud not keep their promise. They structured the law so tat cameras could be placed in 25 % of the city where no school children are crossing and would be in effect 24 hours a day. I didn’t think however they would stoop to place one between an exit and entrance ramp? Why there and not a mile away at Avenue Z school zone? Because they placed it where it could generate the highest amount of revenue, because safety is not their prime concern. Increased revenue is.

          • Andrew

            I’m afraid I’m not responsible if you made an incorrect assumption regarding where and when speed cameras could legally be used for enforcement. If this is not a legal placement, then if course the tickets should be dismissed on that technicality, but as a matter of fact I’m pretty sure this is a legal placement. The law is what it is, not what you assumed it to be.

            Pedestrians are killed by motorists at all times of day and in all sorts of locations. A disproportionate number are killed at night (when state law does not allow the use of speed cameras) and on arterial streets (including those with no school nearby). The restrictions imposed by state law cost lives, but the city has every obligation to its citizens to take maximum advantage of the cameras to protect as many lives as possible.

            The point of speed cameras is to persuade motorists to slow down and obey the speed limit. They are most useful at locations where a lot of motorists speed. That “speed limit 30″ sign isn’t just decoration.

          • Michael T

            The tickets list school speed zone ( New York City Dept. Of Finance School Zone Camera Unit), did you know that? No signs posted for a school zone. Is the ramp part of the school zone when the school is approximately 1200 feet away? Why not just issue the tickets for speeding, why mention that it’s a school zone? This is what is annoying everyone and leaving open this debate.

          • Andrew

            The state legislation authorizing the use of speed cameras limits their use to areas near schools. The exact definition of “areas near schools” is defined in the legislation. As I understand it, the city street that’s home to this camera meets the requirements of the law. (If you disagree, feel free to challenge any tickets you’ve gotten on those grounds.)

            What’s “annoying everyone” is that they’re suddenly bring asked to abide by traffic laws.

  • The_Bork_Man

    This headline is wrong – it should have read “DOT confirms that it views NYC Drivers as their own personal ATM”.

    • Andrew

      Only the ones who can’t figure out what the words “speed limit” mean. Nobody will object if you opt out.

    • slowdown

      Once again, we hear the motorist crowd demanding the right to speed…

      • guest

        Once again we see the clueless transportation alternative clowns that no nothing about what they’re talking about.

        • Eric McClure

          It’s “know.” Clueless.

  • SadButTrue

    The fact is, there will probably be some overshoot here as far as speed limits, cameras, etc. But don’t blame the politicians. You motorists who insist on the right to speed, who demand it, you who drive so incredibly recklessly, are to blame. You who yell at me as I assert my right to cross the street with the walk sign showing. I feel bad for those of you motorists who are responsible drivers , but from what I see, you now constitute well under 50% of the road.

    • Guest

      They will find a way to come for you soon enough.

    • guest

      You obviously didn’t read the article.

  • Brooklyn

    A-holes and sociopaths. Slow down when you get off the highway. Don’t drive like a schmuck in the neighborhood. And if you do, get your ticket and deal with it. You deserve it.

    • WellDoneAndYouWillBe

      Succinct and direct. But you said it all in just a few words.

  • Pingback: Brooklyn News Roundup | Fort Greene Focus

  • Guest

    I’m with the motorists! Everyone is still decelerating (is that the right word?), the camera should be just outside of the exit ramp. When I got off at my exit at Jericho Tpke which is about 400 feet long and off of the Cross Island, I am going pretty fast until the very end where I totally slow down to look for oncoming traffic to my right. It gives me enough time to slow down gradually. This SHOUTS money trap! As a parent, I don’t appreciate you taking my money in the name of protecting my kids. No kid belongs near the exit ramp!

    • Andrew

      The camera is outside of the exit ramp! It’s on a city street (one with a sidewalk and with intersections and with traffic signals), just past an explicit 30 mph speed limit sign. And it doesn’t issue tickets to anyone driving at 40 mph or less!

      • BrooklynBus

        But soon you will get tickets for driving at 36 mph on a road where that speed is perfectly safe since the intersections are far away and there is no reason to cross the street between the exit and entrance ramp anyway because there is only the highway on that side of the street and tennis courts and a fence on the other side. So this is not at all about pedestrians.

      • Michael T

        Since you know so much about the area, how close in feet are the next intersections and traffic signals? So it’s alright in your book to go 40 mph, but not 41 mph ?

        • Andrew

          Since you know so much about the area, how close in feet are the next intersections and traffic signals?

          Does Google Maps not work for you? (It’s about 1200 feet from the end of the exit ramp to the intersection with Ocean Parkway.)

          So it’s alright in your book to go 40 mph, but not 41 mph ?

          Sorry, I’m not a state legislature, and I didn’t write the law. I personally think it would be best for all parties for the speed limit to be enforced as posted – so if the speed limit is 30, anybody driving over 30 (subject to the tolerances of the speed sensors) would be ticketed.

          But state law requires a 10 mph buffer, so we have a 10 mph buffer. I don’t think it’s perfect – it’s not the only flaw in the legislation – but it’s a lot better than nothing. I’ll take what I can get.

          In any case, the line has to be drawn somewhere. Unless you’re arguing that there should be no line at all, and that motorists should be entitled to drive as fast as they like, which I think is what you’re probably arguing.

          • guest

            It’s very simple. If you drove like you claim to, you would understand that a buffer is needed to slow down. People are not arguing that they should have the right to speed. People are arguing that this is a trap. When you are coming off of the belt which has a speed limit that is higher then the street, you should not be penalized within the first 1000 feet if you are going 50 mph and decelerating for example.

            These cameras belong on dangerous intersections. Where this camera is located, is NOT repeat NOT even an intersection. If it were located down at Ocean Parkway, it would make much more sense and I am pretty sure this discussion would not be taking place.

            You claim all us drivers are whining. Yes people are angry because WE are being taken advantage of. Perhaps an example you could understand is if you received a $50 ticket for walking on the white line in a crosswalk with the light in your favor.

            This is nothing more then an unfair money grabbing tactic.

          • Andrew

            It’s very simple. If you drove like you claim to, you would understand that a buffer is needed to slow down. People are not arguing that they should have the right to speed. People are arguing that this is a trap. When you are coming off of the belt which has a speed limit that is higher then the street, you should not be penalized within the first 1000 feet if you are going 50 mph and decelerating for example.

            The exit ramp is about 450 feet long, which is plenty long enough to slow down from 50 mph to 30 mph (and most certainly to 40 mph, which is enough to avoid a speed camera ticket). There are plenty of exit ramps that are even shorter yet end at stop signs or traffic signals!

            If you have any difficulty whatsoever slowing your car from 50 mph to 40 mph over the distance of 450 feet, your brakes are seriously defective.

            These cameras belong on dangerous intersections. Where this camera is located, is NOT repeat NOT even an intersection. If it were located down at Ocea n Parkwa y, it would make much more sense and I am pretty sure this discussion would not be taking place.

            These are speed cameras, not red light cameras. They don’t generally belong at intersections at all. They belong in approach to intersections – e.g., this camera, which is in approach to the intersection you bring up.

            You claim all us drivers are whining. Yes people are angry because WE are being taken advantage of.

            Actually, you’re angry because, after having grown accustomed to having virtually no speed enforcement on city streets, you’re finally being asked to watch your speed. Even an absurdly generous 10 mph buffer isn’t good enough for you.

            Perhaps an example you could understand is if you received a $50 ticket for walking on the white line in a crosswalk with the light in your favor.

            Strange analogy. If people were getting tickets for driving at precisely 30 mph, I could almost understand the analogy to getting a ticket for walking at the very edge of the crosswalk. (Almost, because a pedestrian who walks at the edge of or even outside a crosswalk is unlikely to be endangering anyone’s life aside from perhaps his own.) But I haven’t seen anyone complaining about getting a speeding ticket for driving at 30 mph or 31 mph or 32 mph. No, the tickets don’t kick in until speeds are more than 10 mph over the legal limit!

            This is nothing more then an unfair money grabbing tactic.

            As I’ve said, if you don’t like it, opt out. There’s even a sign telling you how: it says “speed limit 30.” Nobody’s forcing you to get a ticket.

          • Michael T

            ” I’ll take what I can get”( Very interesting comment). Shouldn’t it be: We’ll take what we can get (all New Yorkers that are concerned for safety). You’re sounding like this is only your crusade, and that no one else cares. Hence, your expertise in mapping out the area and defining what consists of a public street. You don’t leave any room for debate, and only see things your way.

          • BrooklynBus

            I am waiting for Andrew to comment on the cyclist who mowed down the pedestrian in Central Park. He only comments when there is a crash involving a motorist and it is always the motorist who is at fault. The cyclist claimed the accident was unavoidable. I asked him if it was possible for a motorist to cause a crash that was “unavoidable”.

          • Andrew

            How nice of you to put words in my mouth. I’ve been away for a few days, somewhat out of contact, so I don’t know if any new information has been released. Last I heard, it wasn’t clear whether the cyclist had run a red light or was traveling in excess of the 25 mph speed limit. In any case, he was clearly cycling too fast for an area of a park with heavy pedestrian activity.

            There may be more information by now. The police have been taking this case pretty seriously. If only they’d take other cases of pedestrian injuries and fatalities with the same seriousness.

            Since the incident in Central Park involving a cyclist, there have been quite a few incidents across the city involving motorists. Here are nine examples. I would like to see each of these incidents receive similar scrutiny to the Central Park incident, yet it doesn’t appear like that’s the plan for any of them. What do you think?

            http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140925/nolita/elderly-woman-struck-killed-by-party-rental-van-police-says http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/09/19/2-dead-14-year-old-boy-injured-in-belt-parkway-crash/ http://nypost.com/2014/09/23/elderly-driver-reversed-car-into-grocery-store/ http://gothamist.com/2014/09/14/williamsburg_hit_run_leaves_woman_i.php http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140923/midtown-south/motorcyclist-hits-pedestrian-by-bryant-park-police-say http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140923/ditmars/three-kids-among-6-seriously-hurt-ditmars-crash-fdny-says http://www.westsiderag.com/2014/09/19/car-hits-woman-pushing-a-stroller-on-west-end-avenue http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140925/east-village/man-seriously-hurt-after-truck-hits-him-east-village-fdny-says http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bronx/man-25-hit-car-bronx-clings-life-article-1.1947226

          • Andrew

            I’m sorry, but I take it quite personally when an irresponsible motorist chooses to threaten my life or the life of a loved one.

            I’m well aware that I’m not alone, but I’m also well aware that there are still a lot of New Yorkers who believe that they have the right to do whatever they wish behind the wheel of a motor vehicle. For instance, everyone who’s been whining incessantly here about having been penalized for exceeding the speed limit by more than 10 mph.

            Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.

          • fdtutf

            “Car owners are not mortal enemies of pedestrians and vice versa.”

            Sadly, they are, and in a more literal way than you’re willing to acknowledge.

          • guest

            That is one hell of an arrogant and utterly absurd statement. So all of us car owners are your enemy? Here’s a solution…

            I suggest you move to the middle of the ocean. You will have nothing to fear from cars. Sharks perhaps. Maybe the occasional sea vessel. But at least those cars which are your supposed mortal enemy won’t be able to attack you.

          • Andrew

            Not nearly as arrogant as endangering the lives of pedestrians in order to maybe save a few seconds (or even minutes).

            Don’t want a speeding ticket? Then don’t speed.

          • Michael T

            Not to make this drivers against pedestrians(as you want us to be against each other), but do pedestrians ever cross against the light or in the middle of the block to save a few seconds or minutes? Everyone has the capability of making mistakes or using poor judgement. I’m sure you’re not perfect!

          • Andrew

            Not to make this drivers against pedestrians(as you want us to be against each other), but do pedestrians ever cross against the light or in the middle of the block to save a few seconds or minutes?

            Of course, and they have the strongest incentive possible to do so safely – risk of death.

            There’s a huge difference between doing something that potentially puts your own life at risk and doing something that potentially puts somebody else’s life at risk. In fact, crossing against the light or mid-block, when no traffic is approaching, can easily be safer than waiting for the light and crossing in conflict with turning traffic, which may or may not yield.

            As the 2010 New York City Pedestrian Safety Study & Action Plan finds, “Nearly half (47%) of pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries occurred at signalized intersections; surprisingly, most (57%) of these crashes occurred while the pedestrian was crossing with the signal.” Unlike the author of this document, I don’t find it surprising at all.

            Everyone has the capability of making mistakes or using poor judgement. I’m sure you’re not perfect!

            That’s the fundamental principle behind Vision Zero. If drivers are driving at a speed that’s safe as long as nothing goes wrong but costs a life if anybody makes a mistake, then drivers are driving too fast. As it stands, in a pedestrian-motorist collision, regardless of which party made the mistake, the pedestrian bears the brunt of the damage.

          • Michael T

            I see, so you’re advocating for kids etc. to cross in between and not at the green ? Really? Your statistics show it’s safer to walk in between parked cars than at a crosswalk? Do you know it’s against the law to jay walk? If a police officer gave you a summons for that, you would run to court showing your statistics and saying you’re not guilty. News flash: IT’S AGAINST THE LAW! This is while you tell everyone else that they broke the law, and stop whining, and just go pay. Unbelievable!

          • Andrew

            I think I made my point very clearly: pedestrians are killed most often while doing nothing wrong – while crossing the street legally, or even while on the sidewalk – by motorists who selfishly break the law. Given the near-lack of enforcement of traffic laws by the NYPD, this should come as no surprise – plenty of motorists have gotten into the habit of speeding, of failing to yield to pedestrians, of breaking all sorts of other traffic laws without penalty, and over time they fool themselves into thinking that they’re not really doing anything wrong.

            It is impossible to significantly reduce the pedestrian fatality and injury rate without breaking this dangerous lawless culture of driving. Motorists aren’t going to stop speeding or to start yielding out of the goodness of their hearts (if there was any doubt about that, just read the comments to any of these posts). Do you know what will convince motorists to drive safely? Regular, consistent, pervasive enforcement. Everywhere. All the time. Or as close to “everywhere” and “all the time” as possible. The idea isn’t to surprise or trap drivers – it’s to remind drivers that, if they choose to ignore the law and drive unsafely, they will be penalized, period. (Unfortunately, state law doesn’t permit “everywhere” or “all the time” enforcement.)

            Crossing mid-block, or against the light, when no traffic is approaching is safer than waiting for the light and hoping that a driver making a turn will yield. Yes, in some cases it is illegal (although at most locations, it’s perfectly legal to cross mid-block – only if there is a traffic signal at each end of the block is it illegal), and of course the NYPD has the right to issue summonses. But given that pedestrians crossing illegally don’t typically threaten anyone else’s lives, and that pedestrians already have an extremely strong incentive to not kill themselves, it would be an unproductive, perhaps counterproductive, use of limited resources.

            Maybe to you this is a game. To me it’s a matter of life and death. So you’ll have to pardon me for taking it seriously.

          • BrooklynBus

            As usual you are blowing everything out of proportion by trying to falsely give the impression that most drivers are lawless and reckless who just live to mow down pedestrians every chance they get. The fact is that the overwhelming number of drivers are safe drivers. It’s the few nuts who give all drivers a bad name. If drivers were as reckless as you claim, given the millions of auto trips everyday, we would have hundreds of fatalities everyday which we don’t.

            Enough people have posted that this camera is poorly placed and is just a money grab which it is. However, you chose to just ignore all those comments to post your point of view.

            That’s not to say we do not have a problem. We do and it’s with the law. Why did the police officer who killed someone in Long Island receive only 18 months to four years in prison and will be eligible for parole in 15 months, while a gentleman in Florida who shoots a hole in te wall

          • BrooklynBus

            in the wall protecting his family gets 20 years in prison? That police officer ran over someone.

          • Andrew

            Actually, you’re missing the point entirely. Drivers who kill and injure pedestrians do not fall into the narrow category of “a few nuts.” They’re normal people who have been lulled into the mistaken belief that driving at high speeds on streets with pedestrians is safe, that making turns without first making absolutely certain that no pedestrians or cyclists are approaching is safe, that passing a fresh red light is safe.

            You nearly killed a cyclist while making a turn, without first making absolutely certain that no cyclists were approaching. You could have treated that as a wake up call that your style of driving is not, in fact, as safe as you had previously thought. Instead, you proclaimed that you had done nothing wrong and that it was all the cyclist’s fault.

            There were 44-45 pedestrian/cyclist injuries and fatalities in traffic per day in 2013. That is a massive health crisis. It is in no way remotely acceptable.

            That a bunch of motorists who have grown accustomed to ignoring the law are complaining that, for a change, the law is being enforced does not a trap make.

          • Michael T

            Car owners and drivers are pedestrians as well ! I know I have to cross the streets after dropping my car off. I take the train to the city and believe it or not, I become a pedestrian! So how are we mortal enemies?

  • Helen Smith

    I’m with the motorists! Everyone is still decelerating (is that the right word?), the camera should be just outside of the exit ramp. When I got off at my exit at Jericho Tpke which is about 400 feet long and off of the Cross Island, I am going pretty fast until the very end where I totally slow down to look for oncoming traffic to my right. It gives me enough time to slow down gradually. This SHOUTS money trap! As a parent, I don’t appreciate you taking my money in the name of protecting my kids. No kid belongs near the exit ramp!

  • Pingback: Sheepshead Bites » Blog Archive Speed Camera Issued 6,000 Tickets In One Day At Belt Parkway Exit Ramp » Sheepshead Bay News Blog

  • Pingback: Sheepshead Bites » Blog Archive DOT Says Deutsch Is Wrong On Speed Camera Numbers, But Refuses To Back Up Claim (Updated) » Sheepshead Bay News Blog

  • agilecyborg

    Chaim needs your cash, suckas. Some people are very good at exploiting governmental power for their own greedy goals. And they usually get voted in quite easily by the average ninny American.

  • Pingback: Brooklyn News Roundup