Photo By Erica Sherman

Photo By Erica Sherman

Plumb Beach is considered one of the most vulnerable stretches of coastlines in the city, and the overall sand replenishment and long-term restoration effort undertaken by federal and city officials is being considered as a model for rehabilitating Sandy-devastated areas. NY1 is reporting on the progress and the specifics of Plumb Beach, an effort expected to be finished by the end of the year.

Previously, we reported on the Army Corps of Engineers work on Plumb Beach, noting that the first phase of the operation, which was sand replenishment, had been completed. Phase two involves the construction of two terminal groins and one offshore breakwater and the installation of 1.2 acres of beach grass. Army Corps engineer John Knight described the purpose of the stone groins to NY1.

“The eastern groin right there acts as a catch for sand movement along the beach, keeps the sand and the protection in place on the shoreline itself,” Knight said.

The report also described how, as work continues, the project is laying the foundation for other shore restoration projects needed following Sandy:

Officials say the work here needs to be replicated in Sandy-devastated areas.

“This was a success story. It’s a wonderful model for the type of work that we must do,” [Representative Hakeem] Jeffries said.

“It’s going to allow us to do this very similar work in the Rockaways, which we already started with 4 million cubic yards of sand that will be laid there, and very shortly after that, right here in Brooklyn’s Coney Island,” Jeffrey said.

To see video of the construction effort being undertaken by the Army Corps, click here.

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  • Jim

    FIX THE F*CKING BICYCLE PATH, YOU F*CKING HYPOCRITES!
    Water is still gonna flood Belt Parkway the next storm!!

  • Mat50

    I will say it again. It was wrecked in 2009 and they sat on their hands until after Sandy in 2013 got it more publicity. Videos of water up to the axles of cars on the Belt did nothing to move the city, the feds or anyone to fix it, because…it’s not Manhattan, it’s only a working class area below the “red line”. If this were in Manhattan, it would have been paved smooth in 5 days, not rot for 5+ years. All the talk of greenway and DOT clout with the dreaded pedestrian/bike path doesn’t apply to a non hipster, non-Brownstone neighborhood.