Source: Cymbrowitz’s office

The NYC Community EMS Volunteer Ambulance Corp. (CEMSVAC) picked a heck of a time to get rolling. The Midwood-based volunteer group was founded in June of 2012, a few months before Superstorm Sandy created unprecedented emergency conditions.

Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz awarded the new volunteer group a special citation, commending them for performing an amazing service in the worst of circumstances.

“The group dispatched between 40 and 50 volunteers all over southern Brooklyn to rescue residents and fellow first responders whose lives were in danger,” Cymbrowitz said in presenting the corps with an Assembly citation. “Our community needed all the help it could get during Superstorm Sandy, and CEMSVAC selflessly put the needs of others above their own and served as a reassuring presence during a difficult time.”

In accepting the citation, CEMSVAC Chief Operating Officer Ezra Max stressed the importance of volunteering in the world of EMS.

“We not only want to save lives,” said Max, “but also encourage people to get involved in careers in EMS. During a time when people are very ‘me me me’, we are trying to do the opposite — we are trying to bring people together to be selfless and help other human beings.”

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  • GoodPeople

    GOD BLESS THESE VOLUNTEERS. WE NEED MORE PEOPLE LIKE THEM, WHO CARE ABOUT HELPING PEOPLE IN NEED. HOWEVER, YOU DIDN’T POST THEIR PHONE NUMBER. I HOPE THAT WAS AN OVERSIGHT.

    • ES

      They have two phone numbers:

      1- For a medical emergency: (718) 301-9888.

      2- For a non-medical emergency: (718) 758-5030.

    • Duke

      These Jews will only help other Jews.

  • guest

    Let me tell you, EMS might just be the most difficult job in the world besides being a front-line soldier. Someone pay these guys already.

  • Subway Stinker

    Our neighborhood has not had good luck with volunteer ambulance corps. Does anyone rembmer the Shorerfront VAC, I guess in the 1980s? With their limited funds and good intentions they bought a used rig that frequently broke down and after a while their enthuiastic young volunteers found other outlets for their energy and the whole corps unraveled. Basically, the southern end of Bklyn is too cheap to fund these programs and we’d rather rely on the paid service from what is now FDNY/EMS. I wish these folks the best but not optomistic.