The individual pictured above is wanted in relation to a bank robbery on Avenue U. The robbery took place on September 18 at approximately 8:30 a.m. The suspect as described as a male in his 20s.

Anyone with information regarding this crime is urged to contact Crime Stoppers. All callers to Crime Stoppers remain anonymous. Crime Stoppers can be reached at 1-800-577-TIPS, via the website, or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then entering TIP577.

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  • Tuth

    Ah yes, the ever illusive “male in 20s.”

  • Andrew Kent

    Why can’t a bank, a BANK, afford better, state-of-the-art, surveillance cameras? I’ve seen better pix from disposable film cameras.  Today’s forensic technology has the potential to slam violent crime, and criminals, on the canvas, yet we allow publicly regulated financial institutions, and now even government subsidized community organizations, to buy obsolete equipment and then expect us to identify miscreants from these amateurish photos.  How are we ever going to stop terrorism if we can’t even get a good full frontal view of a bank robber?  This guy should have been caught on video as he entered and left the bank, and we should be seeing the best eye-level freeze frame from that otherwise routine surveillance video instead of an aerial view of his hat brim that appears to have been taken at the teller’s window.

    • Ishast

       im probably paranoid but i think there’s a conspiracy with the banks getting robbed. i think they dont care since the money is insured. but hey what do i know, im just a gecko

      • Andrew Kent

        Most banks these days don’t have much in the way of security, not even armed guards.  They would rather lose the relatively small amount of money than risk a confrontation in a bank full of customers.  Even when the police get there in time in response to a silent alarm, they will often wait for the perps outside rather than risk a hostage situation.  And many perps aren’t even armed, because they know they can get the money simply by passing a threatening note.  Which is all the more reason why surveillance equipment, both video and audio, must be state-of-the-art.  And, BTW, bank robbery is also a Federal offense, so, why doesn’t the FBI (now part of DHS) insist on better surveillance?

    • Arthur Borko

      I’ve got to say that you might be falling onto the romance perpetrated by Police Procedural nowadays that make our technology seem incredible. 

      In order to get good metrics you need HD camera’s from multiple angles. The other issue is one of Focus. If you focus the camera’s on a general area then the faces wont always be in focus. So you need to have an individual on the video feed that knows who to focus on to capture the right visual information.

      Those are not the only options available. Nearly everyone has a smart phone, and most users will have theirs always seeking free wifi. This means the phone is almost always broadcasting and trying to communicate so you can log any incoming connections and save that data to help identify who was in range when the crime was committed.

      Here is what it really boils down to. It’s not in the financial best interest of the bank to overspend on security. If they get robbed the money is insured. The customers get their money back. We already know that camera’s and dye packets and other preventative measures are not enough to scare away crooks. So they spend the bare minimum and let the police deal with the fallout.

    • http://www.flickr.com/knightmare6 Knightmare6

      They need better placement of cameras, like at a lower level. Notice how a good portion of the forehead is well-covered by simple sunglasses and a baseball hat. Also the picture is pretty bad, because its a still from a video camera, and sadly even with an expensive video camera (like the 70k ones at my job), you can still get bad screen grabs.

  • Guest

    which bank?

  • Alex

    Treyvon is that you?