The living room at the showroom apartment at Z Tower. (Photos by Ray Johnson)

Early this month, we told you that the newest luxury condo at 1702 Avenue Z had lost some of its major players.

A short while before that, when there was still snow on roofs, signs posted invited everyone to come on up to the fourth floor for an open house. Knowing that readers were interested in seeing the design of the apartments, I followed the instructions and headed up to take a look.

There were boxes of appliances stacked in the front entrance and much of the building had an unfinished look to it. The elevator emptied out directly into the apartment, a rare thing around our neck of the woods.

I was expecting a crowd of visitors and a real estate agent there to greet me, but instead I was the only one in the apartment with no one else in sight. Thinking it to be a “show yourself around” type of open house, I toured the narrow rooms.

The building had a modern feel, but closets seemed too small to handle the width of a man’s suit coat. Numerous windows and a few small terraces overlooked Avenue Z. I don’t recall if there was a tub in any of the bathrooms, because I was so overwhelmed at seeing the huge stand up shower in one of them.

The place was decorated with modern furniture and the place was a bit drafty, possibly due to the fact that since no one was living there, there was no need to put on the heat.

I made my way down to the lobby, where there was still no one in sight. I pushed the door to exit and found it locked! For the next scary moment, the only thing I could hear was this phrase repeated in my head over and over again, “Oh no, I’m locked into Z Tower.” For some reason, though, it was in a Count Dracula accent.

As if he would know what to do, I called my editor. That was a waste of some precious cell phone minutes.

As I took deep, calming breaths, some workers came out of the elevator. They looked right through me as I tried to communicate to them about my dilemma. After some chitchat amongst themselves in some other language, they disappeared upstairs again. I was left behind in the locked lobby.

I called the agent’s number on the open house sign. She told me to call someone else. Three or so calls later, a man told me that he would send someone over in a few minutes to unlock the door. Before that happened, though, the workers came back down, this time with a key. I thanked them and quietly slipped out as the others made their way through the door. Once again, no one even acknowledged me and my red face.

The lesson to be learned here is: don’t believe all signs posted for open houses. Unless the sign has a time and a date, do not enter. Sometimes, an open house on the way in means a locked house on the way out.

Take a look at the pictures I snapped of apartment 4A and a few more on the realtor.com website before making a visit. If  you happen upon $778.5K and you decide to take a look at the apartment, make sure there is another means of egress, in case the lobby door locks behind you.

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  • sheepsbay_resident

    The price is a total joke, so is the quality of the building.
    They recently put up the “indoor parking” sign; I am wondering where that “indoor parking” is?

  • hepcat

    You're only helping these low-lifes who represent the building by posting photos of the apartments. You should have helped them by going back upstairs, and grabbing a piece a furniture to hurdle through the window to free yourself – then helped yourself to that flat-screen TV for your troubles. – peace

  • tj

    looks good for 400k

  • Local Broker

    lol that tv is cardboard

  • frankiev

    I watched this building go up for the last 2 or 3 years. I have no idea what the quality of the finishing touches are but I can tell you that if there is a nuclear attack, the basement of this building is where you want to be. It amazes me that there is any room in the apts. themselves since they poured the biggest, fattest cement supporting beams I've ever seen. The view from the balcony of the car wash is awesome. Worth every penny of the asking price.

  • http://www.nedberke.com Ned Berke

    I agree – I kept a close eye as this thing was put up, and I have to say that it was done well in terms of support. Some of the newer constructions that have gone up appear to be made of cardboard and popsicle sticks, but this one looks sturdy. That, by the way, is not at all a statement about the quality of the individual apartments or anything else. Just sayin' it ain't about to blow over.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=839675042 Holly Renee Reinhardt

    Wow, not that nice at all. For an extra 10k or so, you could get a condo at the William Beaver house, which is 10 times more fantastic.
    Also, how bad does it look that Ray had to call four people before she got help? If I were the agent, I would be the one doing the calling!!

  • http://www.nedberke.com Ned Berke

    When she called me, I just laughed at her. Laughed and laughed and laughed. When she told me they had food and drinks laid out, I stopped laughing and wondered how I could get locked in zee towah…

  • Ray Johnson

    I never said they had food and drinks laid out. There was a table with coffee cups and a setup for what must have been a long gone open house, but no nothing like what Ned imagined.
    A building with a door that will not open? That's a definite fire hazard.

  • Ray Johnson

    Well, at least the space heater was real. Not 'on', but real.

  • bkgirl

    I watched this building go up too, I never thought it looked well made at all. Concrete walls mean nothing without the results of the slump test and test cyclinders, assuming they did those tests to begin with.

  • etherealglimpse

    I agree more with this assessment. Having civil engineer friends has shown me quite a few things about the effects of forces of nature on giant structures that have nothing to do with how giant something looks. Hopefully though they spent money on blocking the noise from the trains and traffic near by. Although at night I don't notice much noise there. i.e. b36 is twice or once an hour after 11 pm. Trains keep chugging along but its probably the only noise source after 11pm.

  • sheepsbay_resident

    Judging by their job on E 18th and M, I would stay far away from this one. I know some people that have bought on E 18th, and the ceiling fell down because of the water leak on the roof a few months after moving in.

  • etherealglimpse

    I agree more with this assessment. Having civil engineer friends has shown me quite a few things about the effects of forces of nature on giant structures that have nothing to do with how giant something looks. Hopefully though they spent money on blocking the noise from the trains and traffic near by. Although at night I don't notice much noise there. i.e. b36 is twice or once an hour after 11 pm. Trains keep chugging along but its probably the only noise source after 11pm.

  • sheepsbay_resident

    Judging by their job on E 18th and M, I would stay far away from this one. I know some people that have bought on E 18th, and the ceiling fell down because of the water leak on the roof a few months after moving in.

  • http://www.colonialfloorcare.com Polished Concrete

    The elevator emptied out directly into the apartment, a rare thing around our neck of the woods.

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