Ferry Service in Sheepshead Bay - EDC Hearing

Why can’t Sheepshead Bay have a commuter ferry to Manhattan? It’s the parking, stupid.

That was the message Sheepshead Bay residents sent the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC) during last night’s hearing on increasing Brooklyn ferry service to several locations including Sheepshead Bay.

The hearing, hosted by the EDC, the Department of Transportation (DOT), and Councilman Michael C. Nelson’s office, brought out local leaders including Community Board Chairperson Theresa Scavo, Bay Improvement Group president Steve Barrison, and several members of the Sheepshead Bay/Plumb Beach Civic Association and the Manhattan Beach Community Group. All opposed the plans.

“It’s romantic. It’s beautiful. It’s wonderful. But practically speaking, it’s not practical,” said Barrison.

Concerns by local leaders revolve around costs, demand, infrastructure needs, and the time it would take to reach Manhattan. But at the heart of it all is parking.

“Parking in the area is already at a premium. To bring more people in would be a nightmare,” said SB/PB Civic’s attorney, Gene Berardelli.

The ferry proposal, officially known as the Comprehensive Citywide Ferry Study, is still in its early stages, with landing profiles yet to be created. The EDC was unable to provide implementation or operating costs for the service, but noted that the ferry ride from Sheepshead Bay is estimated to take about 40 minutes and cost $6.

CB 15 Chairperson Scavo said she is against adding any ferry service to the area. Sheepshead Bay, she said, already has a wealth of mass transportation options, and adding another would be costly and redundant.

“Why would I pay $6 to ride in the cold during the winter when I could walk a few blocks to Sheepshead Bay train station and pay $2.25 for the train?”

Though there were a few Sheepshead Bay residents at the meeting who supported adding ferry service in the area, they were frequently drowned out by opponents. One resident who suggested turning the lot at Brigham Street and Emmons Avenue – the proposed site of Brigham Street Park – into a parking deck elicited jeers from SB/PB members.

Another resident said that some community members don’t like the crowded trains and might prefer a ferry, which she said are heated, enclosed, and more spacious. BIG President Barrison argued that those people would never generate sufficient demand to warrant the costs of a ferry.

Dr. Saul Katz, Director of Community Relations for Kingsborough Community College, said that a waterway system in the area “has an educational benefit.” He said that many of KCC’s students live in areas inaccessible to the school, forcing them to travel upwards of two and a half hours each way to attend.

“[KCC] graduates are not only given a degree of graduation, but also a certificate of survival,” he said.

Adding ferry service to Sheepshead Bay – with a student-only drop-off and pick-up point at KCC – would alleviate a lot of their problems and aid in recruitment.

Katz’s proposal for an additional landing at KCC, though, was instantly opposed by members of MBCG.

“Manhattan Beach has a major problem with parking around the college,” said Judy Baron, a member of the transportation committee of MBCG. “A ferry anywhere near Manhattan Beach would be unacceptable, including at Kingsborough.”

KCC previously had a ferry shuttle for Rockaway service, but the program closed years ago because of rising costs.

Barrison said those same high costs make this program a waste in Sheepshead Bay. From development issues, parking, and the fishing industry, he said, “Our tax dollars can be put to better use in Sheepshead Bay in more ways that we can agree on.” He and representatives from SB/PB agreed that funds should be allocated to dredging the bay to remove the pileup of sand and debris that currently causes many of the boats to bottom out during low tide.

After the meeting, Councilman Nelson expressed his continued support for the project, despite the night’s vocal opposition.

“It sounds like a good idea to me, but I know anything you do, in Brooklyn or the city, there will be people against it,” he said. “You never get a positive consensus on anything … [but the opposition] doesn’t really bother me that much.

He added that ferry service in general should be adopted as an emergency alternative to other means of transportation.

“In the age of terrorism … it would be nice to know a waterway system was in place. It’s almost like a backup system,” he said.

EDC’s Senior Vice President of Maritime, Venetia Lannon, who moderated the hearing, said that she appreciated the feedback she received. In response to parking concerns, she noted that she experienced the problem on her way to the meeting, and said the dredging issue will also make service to Sheepshead a more challenging prospect than in other areas. The study will continue to consider the area, but the information gathered at the hearing weighs heavily against it.

“I heard more negative than positive. Nevertheless, we will do our due diligence,” she said. “But if I were to take a poll tonight, I think it’s against.”

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  • http://www.gene-2009.com/ Gene B.

    as far as for SB goes, I think it doesn’t fit. Parking is one critical issue. Dredging the bay and making it passable is another. Infrastructure is another – costs of refitting docks to accommodate commuters is one concern not really discussed. But how would you like to be standing on the Bay at 7 AM in the middle of winter with that wind whipping around you waiting to board a ferry?

    SB also carries a jurisdictional issue – who would be in charge? You already have the Parks Dept. and EDC sharing jurisdictions… now you’d bring in another agency into the mix. I see finger-pointing and burden shifting on the horizon the minute any repair or other concern pops up.

    As far as for Brooklyn in general, I’m not totally sold. Anytime you have to induce demand and bring people to an are to use anything, you run the risk of the product not sustaining itself. EDC even said that when you talk ferries, you’re talking subsidies – your tax dollars going towards project that can’t make money on its own. This has the potential to be a good service, or a serious cash drain on the city. We’re talking hundreds of millions of dollars per year.

    I think if combined with the right commercial option, it may work… but I’m not optimistic that a passenger-only ferry will be cost-effective.

    Ferries cost the most in terms of “fuel per passenger” of any kind of alternative public transportation, and it’s not exactly environmentally friendly – you’re trading one kind of emission for another.

    However, I do recognize that communities in Brooklyn and all over the city would benefit from ferry service, and would not begrudge a neighborhood from advocating for one. I just don’t think that the benefit to South Brooklyn is worth the burden.

  • http://www.gene-2009.com Gene B.

    as far as for SB goes, I think it doesn’t fit. Parking is one critical issue. Dredging the bay and making it passable is another. Infrastructure is another – costs of refitting docks to accommodate commuters is one concern not really discussed. But how would you like to be standing on the Bay at 7 AM in the middle of winter with that wind whipping around you waiting to board a ferry?

    SB also carries a jurisdictional issue – who would be in charge? You already have the Parks Dept. and EDC sharing jurisdictions… now you’d bring in another agency into the mix. I see finger-pointing and burden shifting on the horizon the minute any repair or other concern pops up.

    As far as for Brooklyn in general, I’m not totally sold. Anytime you have to induce demand and bring people to an are to use anything, you run the risk of the product not sustaining itself. EDC even said that when you talk ferries, you’re talking subsidies – your tax dollars going towards project that can’t make money on its own. This has the potential to be a good service, or a serious cash drain on the city. We’re talking hundreds of millions of dollars per year.

    I think if combined with the right commercial option, it may work… but I’m not optimistic that a passenger-only ferry will be cost-effective.

    Ferries cost the most in terms of “fuel per passenger” of any kind of alternative public transportation, and it’s not exactly environmentally friendly – you’re trading one kind of emission for another.

    However, I do recognize that communities in Brooklyn and all over the city would benefit from ferry service, and would not begrudge a neighborhood from advocating for one. I just don’t think that the benefit to South Brooklyn is worth the burden.

  • Mat vanGuilder

    Why not just have a ferry for the Summer? New York Waterways stops at Fulton Landing and takes people to Governor’s Island for free when there is an event. You surely don’t have a lot of parking space at Fulton Landing! There are events scheduled this Fall at Battery Park where there is a well established ferry terminal. What a gorgeous day to go from Sheepshead Bay to Battery Park and back. But many people over 50 don’t want the hassle of taking the bus and the subway over and over again.

  • Mat vanGuilder

    Why not just have a ferry for the Summer? New York Waterways stops at Fulton Landing and takes people to Governor’s Island for free when there is an event. You surely don’t have a lot of parking space at Fulton Landing! There are events scheduled this Fall at Battery Park where there is a well established ferry terminal. What a gorgeous day to go from Sheepshead Bay to Battery Park and back. But many people over 50 don’t want the hassle of taking the bus and the subway over and over again.

  • Ray Johnson

    How do Staten Islanders feel about the wind whipping around them when they are waiting for their morning ferry? Probably beats the circuitous trek by bus over the Verrazano.

    If a key concern is adding mass transit options for Kingsborough students, why not build a specific ferry terminal at the college?

    As for parking problems, this exists everywhere in the city and is dependent on factors not related to ferry service. Such a variety of creative people live in this great city — can we not find ways to encourage less dependency on individuals in cars who need to drive when they might be able to walk? (Not talking about tickets, fines, and ridiculous metering.)

    It’s hard to be for or against anything at this point, but easy to see that the subway system and the express buses are not serving the needs of the commuter as well as they could be. Maybe the solution lies in trying to figure out how to better utilize the existing service.

    Environmentally friendly transportation options are most definitely needed, and ought not be thrown to the wayside once the ferry controversy dies down.

    Sheepshead Bay may not be the most ideal spot for such a ferry, for many reasons — let’s see the research. Exploring options for transportation, keeping in mind all factors while conducting true fact-finding studies, before shutting down a discussion — is what intelligent people do.

    Why isn’t someone at the top calling together a special consortium for a serious exchange of ideas instead of these “we’ll fight to the death” meetings?

  • Ray Johnson

    How do Staten Islanders feel about the wind whipping around them when they are waiting for their morning ferry? Probably beats the circuitous trek by bus over the Verrazano.

    If a key concern is adding mass transit options for Kingsborough students, why not build a specific ferry terminal at the college?

    As for parking problems, this exists everywhere in the city and is dependent on factors not related to ferry service. Such a variety of creative people live in this great city — can we not find ways to encourage less dependency on individuals in cars who need to drive when they might be able to walk? (Not talking about tickets, fines, and ridiculous metering.)

    It’s hard to be for or against anything at this point, but easy to see that the subway system and the express buses are not serving the needs of the commuter as well as they could be. Maybe the solution lies in trying to figure out how to better utilize the existing service.

    Environmentally friendly transportation options are most definitely needed, and ought not be thrown to the wayside once the ferry controversy dies down.

    Sheepshead Bay may not be the most ideal spot for such a ferry, for many reasons — let’s see the research. Exploring options for transportation, keeping in mind all factors while conducting true fact-finding studies, before shutting down a discussion — is what intelligent people do.

    Why isn’t someone at the top calling together a special consortium for a serious exchange of ideas instead of these “we’ll fight to the death” meetings?

  • http://www.njluxurymotors.com Arthur Borko

    I think the two biggest reasons why this wont work is The Parking and the Time.

    I’ve made the trip to Lower Manhattan by boat before, on the 4th of July for the fireworks. It took between 40 minutes and an hour just to reach the harbor south of the Brooklyn Bridge. Could the Ferry Terminal in Manhattan even handle more traffic?

    As for Parking there is int any! This wont be a popular opinion here but they would have to scrap the Brigham Street Park project and put an elevated Parking lot in its place. Frankly I think a Parking lot would better serve the community there but thats just me.

    Actually a multi-story parking structure with a park on the roof would work for everyone!

    Here is an Idea. How about commuter helicopters. Buy some surplus troop transport helicopters from the military, retrofit them to carry regular people safely and voila! I’d pay 10$ for a helicopter ride to the city :-D

  • http://www.njluxurymotors.com Arthur B

    I think the two biggest reasons why this wont work is The Parking and the Time.

    I’ve made the trip to Lower Manhattan by boat before, on the 4th of July for the fireworks. It took between 40 minutes and an hour just to reach the harbor south of the Brooklyn Bridge. Could the Ferry Terminal in Manhattan even handle more traffic?

    As for Parking there is int any! This wont be a popular opinion here but they would have to scrap the Brigham Street Park project and put an elevated Parking lot in its place. Frankly I think a Parking lot would better serve the community there but thats just me.

    Actually a multi-story parking structure with a park on the roof would work for everyone!

    Here is an Idea. How about commuter helicopters. Buy some surplus troop transport helicopters from the military, retrofit them to carry regular people safely and voila! I’d pay 10$ for a helicopter ride to the city :-D

  • http://www.nedberke.com Ned Berke

    First of all, I totally support the idea of a helicopter commute. I bet it would also be cheaper and faster to implement and operate than a boat. But I’m sure the insurance costs to the city would sink (no pun intended) the whole thing.

    Ray: There certainly have been a lot of “we’ll fight to the death” meetings in Sheepshead – and all of Brooklyn for that matter. But I wouldn’t say that this was one. Except for a few occasional sneers and jeers, it seemed like there was a genuine debate about concerns and proposals of ferry implementation. And EDC was clear about one thing – this was a feedback session that would GUIDE their research, not DECIDE the outcome. They haven’t yet gotten deep into the research, and when it’s done we’ll definitely be reporting on it.

    But, as I noted at the end of the article, the EDC representative listened to many of these claims and will be studying them to see their basis in reality – but from the looks of it Sheepshead may be a non-starter.

  • http://www.NedBerke.com Ned Berke

    First of all, I totally support the idea of a helicopter commute. I bet it would also be cheaper and faster to implement and operate than a boat. But I’m sure the insurance costs to the city would sink (no pun intended) the whole thing.

    Ray: There certainly have been a lot of “we’ll fight to the death” meetings in Sheepshead – and all of Brooklyn for that matter. But I wouldn’t say that this was one. Except for a few occasional sneers and jeers, it seemed like there was a genuine debate about concerns and proposals of ferry implementation. And EDC was clear about one thing – this was a feedback session that would GUIDE their research, not DECIDE the outcome. They haven’t yet gotten deep into the research, and when it’s done we’ll definitely be reporting on it.

    But, as I noted at the end of the article, the EDC representative listened to many of these claims and will be studying them to see their basis in reality – but from the looks of it Sheepshead may be a non-starter.

  • Ray Johnson

    Thanks for the clarification…I was kind of anticipating that somewhere, somehow, there will be “a fight to the death”, just was hoping that it would be done without any bloodshed…good to here that’s avoided, for now.

  • Ray Johnson

    Thanks for the clarification…I was kind of anticipating that somewhere, somehow, there will be “a fight to the death”, just was hoping that it would be done without any bloodshed…good to here that’s avoided, for now.

  • http://www.njluxurymotors.com Arthur Borko

    You know for parking I bet the Movie Theater could close off the top two levels of their garage to sell/rent spaces for commuters. That parking lot was originally one level anyway and is only really full at night, weekends and holidays.

    Of course then the Ferry would have to load at the Marina at the intersection of Harkness and Plumb 3, which means that part of the creek would need dredging (no way something as heavy as a Ferry could currently get in there) and would add 15 minutes to the trip to get back around to open water.

  • http://www.njluxurymotors.com Arthur B

    You know for parking I bet the Movie Theater could close off the top two levels of their garage to sell/rent spaces for commuters. That parking lot was originally one level anyway and is only really full at night, weekends and holidays.

    Of course then the Ferry would have to load at the Marina at the intersection of Harkness and Plumb 3, which means that part of the creek would need dredging (no way something as heavy as a Ferry could currently get in there) and would add 15 minutes to the trip to get back around to open water.

  • SK

    I am all for the Ferry. I hate taking the train to work. The people in Manhattan Beach should want the Ferry Service for the students attending Kingsborough Community College, heres why; the students live far away, they would rather drive bet. 20 min to an hour from either Queens or The Bronx rather than take a two hour train and bus commute. However, if there was a ferry that went from Queens and The Bronx that took less than an hour, that would be preferable to the two hour commute, and as a result, there would be less students needing to park in Manhattan Beach.

    As far as parking goes for those who want to drive to the Ferry to commute to work, there is plenty of places to consider putting a parking lot. The price of parking a car could be in addition to the cost of the ferry and cost can be according to the value of the land the lot is on to deter as many people as possible. In addition, there can be a compensation program for people who take the bus to the Ferry rather than drive.

    I also think it would be great for our small businesses. Tourists who come to visit NYC are not likely to come and explore Sheepshead Bay because of the train commute and all the transfers they would have to do (depending on where they are coming from.) However, if its just a quick ferry ride, it would be a lovely trip for them to come and explore Historic Sheepshead Bay. In addition, maybe tourists would come and stay in Sheepshead Bay rather than pay Manhattan hotel prices, if Manhattan was easily accessible.

    I love Sheepshead Bay and I think its a wonderful place. I would walk to the ferry everyday and take it to work, and I know others would, too. This is a great opportunity to share our wonderful bay with the world, to invite great people and culture to our community, and to watch our small businesses grow from the influx of our guests.

  • SK

    I am all for the Ferry. I hate taking the train to work. The people in Manhattan Beach should want the Ferry Service for the students attending Kingsborough Community College, heres why; the students live far away, they would rather drive bet. 20 min to an hour from either Queens or The Bronx rather than take a two hour train and bus commute. However, if there was a ferry that went from Queens and The Bronx that took less than an hour, that would be preferable to the two hour commute, and as a result, there would be less students needing to park in Manhattan Beach.

    As far as parking goes for those who want to drive to the Ferry to commute to work, there is plenty of places to consider putting a parking lot. The price of parking a car could be in addition to the cost of the ferry and cost can be according to the value of the land the lot is on to deter as many people as possible. In addition, there can be a compensation program for people who take the bus to the Ferry rather than drive.

    I also think it would be great for our small businesses. Tourists who come to visit NYC are not likely to come and explore Sheepshead Bay because of the train commute and all the transfers they would have to do (depending on where they are coming from.) However, if its just a quick ferry ride, it would be a lovely trip for them to come and explore Historic Sheepshead Bay. In addition, maybe tourists would come and stay in Sheepshead Bay rather than pay Manhattan hotel prices, if Manhattan was easily accessible.

    I love Sheepshead Bay and I think its a wonderful place. I would walk to the ferry everyday and take it to work, and I know others would, too. This is a great opportunity to share our wonderful bay with the world, to invite great people and culture to our community, and to watch our small businesses grow from the influx of our guests.

  • local broker

    why do some still think that SB is a tourist destination its not. this is a dumb idea . you cant compare staten island to this either they have no trains if they had a subway system like brooklyn no one would take the ferry. its true there is no parking in this area i dont live in SB but i am a few blocks away and i rent a parking space so i can get in my car and go where i need to go and dont have to come back to the place i live and look for parking for an hour like most of the people who live here. if you want to take a boat ride im sure you can rent one or go on a fishing trip from the bay.

  • local broker

    why do some still think that SB is a tourist destination its not. this is a dumb idea . you cant compare staten island to this either they have no trains if they had a subway system like brooklyn no one would take the ferry. its true there is no parking in this area i dont live in SB but i am a few blocks away and i rent a parking space so i can get in my car and go where i need to go and dont have to come back to the place i live and look for parking for an hour like most of the people who live here. if you want to take a boat ride im sure you can rent one or go on a fishing trip from the bay.

  • http://www.njluxurymotors.com Arthur Borko

    Speaking of which, the ferry probably would make Sheepshead more of a tourist destination. The Best Western and Comfort Inn could certainly use the business.

    Anywho. I think a ferry would be very very awesome, however, sadly I don’t think for a second that all the local groups and interested parties could actually work together and compromise long enough to make it all work.

    Sheepshead may not be a tourist destination now, but it used to be. There is so much history here! The Indians used to farm oysters in Jamaica Bay, the fishing industry, the old race tracks, Jordons Lobster Dock, Randazzos, the Lundy Building.

  • http://www.njluxurymotors.com Arthur B

    Speaking of which, the ferry probably would make Sheepshead more of a tourist destination. The Best Western and Comfort Inn could certainly use the business.

    Anywho. I think a ferry would be very very awesome, however, sadly I don’t think for a second that all the local groups and interested parties could actually work together and compromise long enough to make it all work.

    Sheepshead may not be a tourist destination now, but it used to be. There is so much history here! The Indians used to farm oysters in Jamaica Bay, the fishing industry, the old race tracks, Jordons Lobster Dock, Randazzos, the Lundy Building.

  • http://sanzay-humor.blogspot.com/ Alex

    Parking issue can be solved by several radical measures: dynamic driveway sharing, elevated parking, parking warehouses in place of the abandoned/dilapidated residential lots (may be a legal challenge). Brigham Street park is not a necessity in the area since there is Plum Beach venue right besides it. No construction necessary. I vote for automated parking warehouse @ Brigham Street whether there is the ferry or not.

    Weather challenge can be solved by the peer shelters where passengers will wait for the ferry.

    PS: Municipal parking by the Brighton boardwalk is better than nothing but the space can be utilized more efficiently.

  • http://sanzay-humor.blogspot.com Alex

    Parking issue can be solved by several radical measures: dynamic driveway sharing, elevated parking, parking warehouses in place of the abandoned/dilapidated residential lots (may be a legal challenge). Brigham Street park is not a necessity in the area since there is Plum Beach venue right besides it. No construction necessary. I vote for automated parking warehouse @ Brigham Street whether there is the ferry or not.

    Weather challenge can be solved by the peer shelters where passengers will wait for the ferry.

    PS: Municipal parking by the Brighton boardwalk is better than nothing but the space can be utilized more efficiently.

  • Bill w

    I hope those thinking about a ferry from SHB look at the Rockaway service running now. It’s nothing like a mass transit service with mulitple deaprtures and multiple destinations. Two departures in the morning which only go to Wall St. does not make mass transit. Better to look at a BRT system. On the other hand, boat excusions to Riis Park, Jamaica Bay Wild Life refuge, links to fishing and dinner boats linking Manhattan during the summer, and making SHB a tourist destination again is probably too much for our 15 minute attention span.

  • Bill w

    I hope those thinking about a ferry from SHB look at the Rockaway service running now. It’s nothing like a mass transit service with mulitple deaprtures and multiple destinations. Two departures in the morning which only go to Wall St. does not make mass transit. Better to look at a BRT system. On the other hand, boat excusions to Riis Park, Jamaica Bay Wild Life refuge, links to fishing and dinner boats linking Manhattan during the summer, and making SHB a tourist destination again is probably too much for our 15 minute attention span.

  • http://www.gene-2009.com/ Gene B.

    A little refresher on the Brigham Park site. Since the ’90s there have been RFPs(Requests for Proposals) that included concessions and various parking configurations. All failed.

    In the most recent RFP, not one viable bid was proposed. Also, multi-tiered parking was vehemently opposed by neighbors (mainly because of the influx of traffic near the on-ramp of the Belt would cause many more accidents and delays) who packed CB15 demanding a park.

    The site of Brigham Park is the last undeveloped parcel of land on Sheepshead Bay’s waterfront. It is owned by Parks Department. The surrounding neighbors fought for 3 years to prevent development on that site – and won. Over 100 people put in a lot of hard work and effort into designing an innovative and realistic conceptual design. This year, we’re now seeing the funding coming in – it’s becoming a reality. Let’s not get short-sighted now.

    I think EDC recognizes, as Ned said, that Sheepshead Bay is a “non-starter” for a ferry. There are too many obstacles to overcome, and more importantly, other communities in Brooklynwith less alternative transportation options than we have that need a ferry.

    (Hey Ned, anything you can do about spacing between paragraphs – besides telling me not to talk so much?!? :-) )

  • http://www.gene-2009.com Gene B.

    A little refresher on the Brigham Park site. Since the ’90s there have been RFPs(Requests for Proposals) that included concessions and various parking configurations. All failed.

    In the most recent RFP, not one viable bid was proposed. Also, multi-tiered parking was vehemently opposed by neighbors (mainly because of the influx of traffic near the on-ramp of the Belt would cause many more accidents and delays) who packed CB15 demanding a park.

    The site of Brigham Park is the last undeveloped parcel of land on Sheepshead Bay’s waterfront. It is owned by Parks Department. The surrounding neighbors fought for 3 years to prevent development on that site – and won. Over 100 people put in a lot of hard work and effort into designing an innovative and realistic conceptual design. This year, we’re now seeing the funding coming in – it’s becoming a reality. Let’s not get short-sighted now.

    I think EDC recognizes, as Ned said, that Sheepshead Bay is a “non-starter” for a ferry. There are too many obstacles to overcome, and more importantly, other communities in Brooklynwith less alternative transportation options than we have that need a ferry.

    (Hey Ned, anything you can do about spacing between paragraphs – besides telling me not to talk so much?!? :-) )

  • http://www.nedberke.com Ned Berke

    Well, you can start by not talking so much ;)

    I kid, talk all you want – it’s why Sheepshead Bites exists.

    As for the line breaks, I’m sure you’ve noticed it’s now fixed. Sorry for the delay in making that happen.

    Anyway, here’s a question: how come the municipal parking on Z and 17th is not tiered? How come the municipal parking on East 16th Street, between Voorhies Avenue and Shore Parkway, is not tiered? Yes, creative solutions are needed to find new locations, but shouldn’t the government first maximize the space it already owns? These hold a combined 139 spaces, where in reality their capacity could probably be quadrupled – without being too much of an eyesore. Shoot – they could probably offset the construction costs by putting retail into the first floor of the one on 17th.

  • http://www.NedBerke.com Ned Berke

    Well, you can start by not talking so much ;)

    I kid, talk all you want – it’s why Sheepshead Bites exists.

    As for the line breaks, I’m sure you’ve noticed it’s now fixed. Sorry for the delay in making that happen.

    Anyway, here’s a question: how come the municipal parking on Z and 17th is not tiered? How come the municipal parking on East 16th Street, between Voorhies Avenue and Shore Parkway, is not tiered? Yes, creative solutions are needed to find new locations, but shouldn’t the government first maximize the space it already owns? These hold a combined 139 spaces, where in reality their capacity could probably be quadrupled – without being too much of an eyesore. Shoot – they could probably offset the construction costs by putting retail into the first floor of the one on 17th.

  • local broker

    there is one privately owned peice of land that is on the water nothing but grass there but he will never make it into a parking lot. most of NYC has a lot of history but not all are tourist attractions i think there is enough traffic in this area especially in the summer between the beaches the college and shopping there is plenty going on here. this is something that this area does not need. if you want to take a ferry go to sunset park or move to staten island.

  • local broker

    there is one privately owned peice of land that is on the water nothing but grass there but he will never make it into a parking lot. most of NYC has a lot of history but not all are tourist attractions i think there is enough traffic in this area especially in the summer between the beaches the college and shopping there is plenty going on here. this is something that this area does not need. if you want to take a ferry go to sunset park or move to staten island.

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  • giGi

    it's rediculous to even think about doing this – first of all, there is no parking available – whatever we have is metered. To bring all these strangers from neighboring communities into the bay during the early morning hours is uncalled for and just not safe

  • giGi

    PLUS –
    $6.00 EACH WAY TO AND FROM WORK???? I HAVE AN ISSUE EVERY TIME I HAVE TO PAY $2.25!!!!!

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  • Backagain

    Screw parking. I’m sick of every piece of development being held hostage by people with cars. Why the heck do they get top consideration? If parking is at such a premium, start building vertical lots. Otherwise, don’t bring Sheepshead Bay to a standstill every year because of “parking”. According to the “parking” complaint, nothing can ever ever ever be built in the Bay henceforth.
    Personally, I’d love to see a ferry. However, there was one years ago from Wall Street. I took it. Exactly three people got off the ferry by Lundy’s with me. Not exactly a money-maker. I guess it closed soon afterwards.
    On the other hand, perhaps a real valid attempt wasn’t made. Maybe in attempt to cut down the evil of the automobile, there should be a real attempt to promote ferry transportation throughout New York. It’s a shame. New York is made of so much water, and we don’t take advantage of it. Typical of New York: squandering opportunities. I’ll avoid my usual political take on the situation.

  • Backagain

    Sorry, didnt realize this article was two years old!

  • http://www.injury-compensation-zone.co.uk/boat-injury-compensation/ boat injury compensation

    Sheepshead Bay may not be the most ideal spot for such a ferry, for many
    reasons — let’s see the research. Exploring options for
    transportation, keeping in mind all factors while conducting true
    fact-finding studies, before shutting down a discussion — is what
    intelligent people do.

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