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Neighbors, community leaders and faith leaders gathered on the second anniversary of Superstorm Sandy to honor the lives lost in the storm, and from the service came pleas for unity, patience and action from several speakers.

The annual “Light up the shore” event sees communities along the northeast coast light candles along the shoreline, a regional vigil for those affected by the storm. About 70 people turned out to the local event at the Knights of Columbus – Baron DeKalb (3000 Emmons Avenue) for the event, organized by Bay Improvement Group.

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Click to enlarge

CompStat reports are produced by the New York Police Department on a weekly basis. We summarize the week’s statistics for the 61st Precinct reports every Friday. The 61st Precinct is the police command responsible for Sheepshead Bay, Gravesend, Kings Highway, Homecrest, Madison, Manhattan Beach, and Gerritsen Beach.

A reader submitted photo from Halloween 2011.

Trick or treat. Smell my feet. Give me something good to eat. Just leave the poisoned candy and razor-blade apples in the pantry.

This Halloween, as all Halloweens, we should take extra precautions to be safe. While it’s the biggest, bestest holiday for the kiddos, it’s also open season for creeps, pervs, thieves and vandals. Here are a few tips we’ve cobbled together to ensure you have a safe and happy Halloween.

  • Trick-or-treaters should always have adult supervision, even if they are traveling with a group of friends.
  • Be aware of your surroundings at all times; be familiar with the neighborhood you plan on visiting.
  • Avoid poorly-lit areas and homes of people you do not know.
  • Avoid displaying your valuables or electronic devices.
  • Thieves will use this holiday to hide behind a mask to commit crimes.
  • Do not use your cellphones when crossing streets.
  • Place emergency identification information discreetly inside clothing of small children, in case of accidental separation.
  • Halloween treats should only be consumed if they are packaged appropriately in their original, unopened packages. Avoid homemade or unpackaged treats.
  • Avoid hallways and deserted areas that are dimly lit.
  • Do not enter a stranger’s home or car.
  •  Walk on the sidewalk and not in the street.
  • Do not wear costumes that block your view.
  • Do not wear clothing or accessories that suggest that you are affiliated with a gang.
  • Carry flashlights and wear reflective clothing at night.
  • Explain to children of all ages the difference between tricks and vandalism which could be a criminal offense.

If you feel that you are in any kind of danger, look for houses of worship, stores or places of business where you can go in case of an emergency, and where you can access help and information. Try not to be alone at any time.

As usual, one more: if you’re the parent of a teenager in Gerritsen Beach, lock up the hammers and potatoes this year.

Photo by David Aranov

Photo by David Aranov

Photo by David Aranov

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

photo via tsc nyc marathon

This Sunday, November 2 is the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon–and whether you’re planning to go out and cheer or steer clear of race-related traffic concerns altogether, there’s an extensive list of street closures you might want to get to know. Via the NYPD:

Beginning at midnight on Sunday, November 2, the upper level of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge will be closed to vehicle traffic. At approximately 7 a.m. rolling street closures will commence along the route in preparation for the marathon… Street closures and parking restrictions are expected to cause traffic delays. The use of public transportation is highly recommended.

Below are the Brooklyn roads being affected by closures (see full five borough list here):

  • Dahlgren Place between Verrazano Bridge and 92nd Street (North Bound)
  • 92nd Street between Dahlgren Place and 4th Avenue
  • 4th Avenue between 92nd Street and Flatbush Avenue
  • Flatbush Avenue between 4th Avenue and Lafayette Avenue
  • Brooklyn Queens Expressway (South-bound) between Verrazano Bridge and 79th Street
  • 7th Avenue between 79th Street and 75th Street / Bay Ridge Parkway
  • 7th Avenue between 74th Street and 75th Street
  • 74th Street between 6th Avenue and 7th Avenue
  • 6th Avenue between 74th Street and 75th Street
  • Bay Ridge Parkway between 7th Avenue and 4th Avenue
  • 92nd Street between Gatling Place and Fort Hamilton Parkway
  • Fort Hamilton Parkway between 92nd Street and 94th Street
  • 94th Street between Fort Hamilton Parkway and 4th Avenue (North-bound)
  • 4th Avenue between 94th Street and Flatbush Avenue (South-bound)
  • Bedford Avenue between Lafayette Avenue and Nassau Avenue
  • Nassau Avenue between Bedford Ave / Lorimer St and Manhattan Ave
  • Manhattan Avenue between Nassau Avenue and Greenpoint Avenue
  • Greenpoint Avenue between Manhattan Ave and McGuiness Boulevard
  • McGuiness Boulevard between Greenpoint Avenue and 48th Avenue
  • Pulaski Bridge (South-bound)

Police also note the security measures for this year’s event for both runners and spectators, including how to make the day easier on yourself:

Prior to taking their starting positions on Staten Island, runners will be screened and their bags inspected. The New York Road Runners has provided the participants with clear bags to expedite this process. Individuals who require event credentials and special access to secure areas, such as organizers, volunteers and other personnel, have been pre-screened in addition to the physical screening they will receive on Sunday.

Along the course, bags and backpacks may be subject to search. Bag checks and magnetometer screenings will be conducted in the area of the finish line. Spectators can help expedite, if not alleviate some of the security process, by leaving backpacks at home.

If you’re running in this year’s event, good luck!

Photo via TSC New York City Marathon

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Galina Basova, left, and Roza Murdokhayeva, right. (Source: Be Proud Foundation)

Another year, another two talented beauties crowned Your Highness Grandmother.

The 12th year of the event took place October 19 at National Restaurant, where Roza Mordukhayeva, 80, was crowned Queen Grandmother and Galina Basova, 68, won the Grandmother title for the younger batch of beauts.

Murdokhayeva was born in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. She worked as a nurse for more than 45 years, and adores children. Dancing and singing are her true passion, and Murdokhayeva has performed in the pageant, organized by the Be Proud Foundation, multiple times. She has four grandchildren, and one great grandson.

The other lovely lady, Basova, is from Russia. She’s seen her family grow tremendously stateside, and is now the proud grandmother of five. She studied communications at the institute of Leningrad, and has just one hobby: travel.

The event celebrates the lives of grandmothers across Southern Brooklyn. It’s a good-natured competition, based on dancing, singing, talents, costume design and more. It’s judged by a panel of those who love grandmothers best: grandfathers.

Congratulations to Basova and Mordukhayeva!

Engine where he worked. (Source: Google Maps)

Engine 329 in Queens, where Schreiner worked. (Source: Google Maps)

An FDNY firefighter arrested in 2013 for assaulting a black postal worker while yelling racist slurs was ordered to attend diversity classes and complete an anger management course on Wednesday.

The New York Post reports:

Luke Schreiner, 49, was convicted on misdemeanor attempted assault and harassment raps for his ugly attack on mild-mannered Rene Isidore, 57, in a September bench trial in Brooklyn Supreme Court.

“A fireman is supposed to save lives. Mr. Schreiner almost ended my life instead,” Isidore said in his victim impact statement.

“He grabbed me by my chest and pulled as if I was an animal.”

Schreiner originally faced a hate crime charge for the assault, which stems from a November 13, 2013 incident, but was acquitted on that charge last month because it was not the motivation for the assault, the judge determined.

“The defendant was upset and he struck [the mailman] because he believed the postal truck grazed his vehicle,” the judge said.

He was suspended for a month after the incident, in which he allegedly smacked Isiidore in the face, broke his sunglasses, and shouted racial slurs at him and a black woman passing by – all in front of his own Gerritsen Beach home.

A previous report from the Post likened the court transcriptions to Django Unchained screenplay, with the N-word repeated numerous times.

“You’re nothing but a f—— n—–! That’s why you work for the Postal Service,” testified postal worker Rene Isidore…

“You’re a n—-r​,​ too!” Schreiner yelled at a black passerby, prosecutor Damani Sims said in his opening statement. “You’re all n—–rs! You’re the color of my s–t!”

Schreiner was ultimately convicted of misdemeanor attempted assault and harassment charges.

The Daily News reports that he has two previous assault arrests, including one for road rage.

suspect

Knock, knock. Who’s there? Thief.

A man and a woman wormed their way into a Coney Island Avenue apartment building, knocked on someone’s door, and ripped an iPhone right out of the tenant’s hand when he answered, police say.

The 29-year-old man was robbed at 4:45pm on September 19, sparking a hunt for the two perps now wanted for grand larceny.

The male thief is described as white, between 30 and 35 years old, approximately 6’0″ and between 220lbs and 240lbs. He was wearing a white tank top and tan pants.

The woman is described as light-skinned, between 25 and 30 years old, also 6’0″ and was wearing jeans and a hat.

The two were caught on surveillance camera fleeing the lobby of the building.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477).  The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

Photo by Knightmare6

Photo by Knightmare6

A Brooklyn court ruled that the city was not responsible for the drowning of a 10-year-old girl in 2008, saying that the city is “not an insurer” of the safety of parkgoers.

The case stems from the July 2008 drowning of Akira Johnson, who was swimming with her cousin, also 10, on Coney Island. They became distressed and a nearby lifeguard came to their aid, only saving Johnson’s cousin. The girl, lost to the water, washed ashore days later.

Brooklyn Eagle reports:

The family filed a wrongful death suit against the city with claims of negligence. A lower court judge found merit in the family’s suit and allowed the case to proceed. The higher appeals court, however, acknowledged the city’s responsibility to its park users, but held that the city’s lifeguards did not deviate from its public safety obligations.

Evidence showed that the city “had furnished a sufficient number of lifeguards, that those lifeguards were experienced and competent…that they were adequately trained and properly certified… and that they reacted to the situation in accordance with proper procedure,” the appeals court noted

The victim’s family argued that the training was inadequate as it takes place in a swimming pool.

New York Law Journal reports:

Plaintiff’s attorney Arnold E. DiJoseph argued that the lifeguards were not properly trained to handle rescues in rip currents. “Basically, they are trained in swimming pool rescues,” he said in an interview.

But a unanimous panel of Justices Ruth Balkin, John Leventhal, Joseph Maltese and Betsy Barros held the city had met its duty to maintain the beach in “reasonably safe condition,” citing the lifeguards’ prompt mobilization and the fact that they rescued Akira’s 10-year-old cousin in the same incident. At least six lifeguards responded when they observed the two children in distress.

“[The] city is not an insurer of the safety of the users of its parks, including its beaches,” the court ruled.

Photo by Arthur Borko

Photo by Arthur Borko

I think this is one of those titles that made sense in my head and no one else’s.

Photo by Arthur Borko

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.