Kings Highway and Nostrand Avenue, the scene of the hit-and-run. (Source: Google Maps)

Kings Highway and Nostrand Avenue, the scene of the hit-and-run. (Source: Google Maps)

Police are looking for any information regarding a hit-and-run incident last week at Kings Highway and Nostrand Avenue.

Two pedestrians were crossing the street at that intersection on September 17 at approximately 4:15pm when a blue SUV barreled through a red light. After hitting them both, the driver fled the scene.

The victims were taken to Kings County Hospital, where they were listed in stable condition.

Cops have little other information to go on, although they said one witness believed the vehicle was an Infiniti.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) and then entering TIP577.

Passengers prepare to board the Q35 at Riis Park Beach en route to Flatbush Avenue. Source: Ryan Janek Wolowski | Flickr

Passengers prepare to board the Q35 at Riis Park Beach en route to Flatbush Avenue. Source: Ryan Janek Wolowski | Flickr

THE COMMUTE: Regular readers of The Commute know that my favorite topic is the need for better bus routes. I have written about this on numerous occasions. We also often hear about reliability issues, a subject we have also addressed.

The big push now by the MTA, the mayor, and New York City administrators is to greatly expand Select Bus Service (SBS), conceived more than 10 years ago, and first arriving in Brooklyn last year on the B44. The MTA recently sponsored a discussion at the Transit Museum about their plans to greatly expand SBS. I did not attend because I heard their spiel many times before. That SBS makes service better for everyone. Buses travel faster and everyone benefits. Ninety-nine percent of the SBS riders love it. We can’t afford to build any more subway lines (except in Manhattan, of course), so this is the answer for the next generation. I knew there would be no opportunity to challenge these claims.

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conaming

Elected officials, the NYPD, family and friends attended to honor the late Community Board chair.

Family, friends and community leaders gathered Wednesday to honor John E. Nikas, a longtime chairperson of Community Board 15 and former assistant to Governor Mario Cuomo.

The intersection of East 12th Street and Sheepshead Bay Road, behind the 61st Precinct, received a new sign reading John E. Nikas Way in recognition of his community activism on what would have been his 81st birthday.

In addition to his work on the Community Board and for the governor, Nikas, who passed away in 2011 at age 78, was remembered as a tireless community advocate who sought to help the less fortunate.

Daily News writes:

He served three decades on the board of New York Community Hospital and co-founded a charity called Youth DARES, which helps at-risk kids and now annually serves more than 400 youngsters.

“He wanted to make a difference for his children and grandchildren and for the community we live in,” said his wife, Rose Nikas.

 

This is a paid announcement from Accord Physicians Urology:

The benefits of seeking professional treatment for erectile dysfunction may seem obvious to both the patient and his partner. But what many men don’t realize is that a thorough evaluation of this condition can uncover serious threats to their health.

Dr. Vitaly Raykhman, Director of Sheepshead Bay’s Accord Physicians Urology, also known as the New York Urological Institute, says that millions of men in the United States suffer from erectile dysfunction. Typically, he said, the man can’t perform at all or is not satisfied with his sexual performance. Although the dysfunction can surface at any age, it is more common in men 50 years old or older.

The problem can be psychological or the impotence may be caused by physiological abnormalities. In such cases, he said, the dysfunction may be related to diabetes or an indication of even more serious conditions. Clinical tests done at Accord Physicians Urology can help doctors determine the reason of impotence.

“Sexual dysfunction is not just an embarrassment or inconvenience,” said Dr. Raykhman. “It is important that men who are experiencing this problem be promptly and properly evaluated by a urologist.”

Erectile dysfunction, he stressed, can be an early indicator of “metabolic syndrome,” a name given to a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health threats, including heart attack and stroke.

“The fact that they are bringing this problem into their consciousness can give a physician several years of lead time in heading off these far more serious medical problems,” said Dr. Raykhman. “Could a visit to a urologist indirectly save a patient’s life? Absolutely.”

At this time, the doctor explained, there is no cure for organic impotence. However, a skilled urologist can slow the progress of the dysfunction and with the proper treatment most patients can regain a more satisfying sexual experience.

Although surgery is sometimes necessary, “it’s the last resort.” Changes in lifestyle can often reverse the effects of erectile dysfunction. These include exercise, improvements in diet, and a reduction in smoking and alcohol intake. Erectile dysfunction can often be treated with medications such as Cialis, Viagra, Levitra or hormone therapy.

Dr. Raykhman stressed that because an erection is a vascular event, erectile dysfunction needs cannot be ignored. Fortunately, he said, for many reasons, men are no longer as reluctant to discuss this condition with a doctor as they once were.

Accord Physicians Urology is equipped to give patients a thorough evaluation and offers a wide range of treatment options. All visits are strictly confidential.

Accord Physicians Urology, 2632 East 14th Street, between Avenue Z and Shore Parkway. (347) 706-1743, . Open Monday through Friday, 9am—6pm, Saturday and Sunday 9am–3pm.

The above is a paid announcement by Accord Physicians Urology. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

Photo by Bob De Thomas

Photo by Bob De Thomas

Today’s beautiful submission is from a friend, former colleague and all-around nice guy.

Photo by Bob De Thomas

Morning Mug is our daily showcase of photographs from our readers. If you have a photograph that you’d like to see featured, send it to photos@sheepsheadbites.com.

Source: Gregory Maizous

This is a paid announcement from Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) and the NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation:

The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will host a free public workshop at Coney Island Hospital (2601 Ocean Parkway) to help residents get the most out of their benefits in advance of the new enrollment period.

Health insurance specialists from CMS will conduct a learning session at Coney Island Hospital on October 1 to prepare residents to enroll when Medicare and the Affordable Care Act reopen for enrollment on October 15 and November 15, respectively.

The sessions will offer information about health care reform, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and how to select and purchase on the online New York State of Health, an exchange set up under the ACA last year to provide subsidized health insurance. Open enrollment for New York State of Health takes place November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015.

“HHC wants to help people make the most of their health coverage options,” said HHC President Dr. Ram Raju. “The Affordable Care Act and the State’s health insurance exchange offer many people subsidies to make health coverage affordable. Our partnership with CMS will help City residents understand the ACA and maximize their Medicare benefits.”

Workshop participants will learn about:

  • The benefits of the Medicare program and how to apply;
  • The parts of Medicare – Part A: hospital insurance; Part B: medical insurance – outpatient visits, lab work, preventive services; Part C: health plans; and Part D: prescription drug coverage;
  • The Medicare appeals process;
  • The Medicare programs in place for people with limited income and resources;
  • Medicare information and resources now available online;
  • Updates on the New York State of Health;
  • Enrollment resources for the uninsured.

CMS is the federal agency that provides health coverage for 100 million people through Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Medicare is a health insurance program for people age 65 or older, people younger than 65 with disabilities, and people with end stage renal disease who require dialysis or a transplant.

“Close to a million New Yorkers have signed up for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act and over three million are enrolled in Medicare, yet most are not aware of how to get the most of their health benefits,” said Frank M. Winter, Partnership Manager, CMS New York Regional Office. “Many others need help obtaining coverage. Our Health Insurance Workshops at HHC facilities throughout New York City provide us a unique opportunity to provide our partners and community members information they can use to sign up for health insurance and to use their new benefits. Our goal this year is to help our partners connect those who are insured from coverage to care.”

Workshops take place from 8:30am to 1:00pm. Participants may register by calling (212) 788-3450, or by clicking here to register at Coney Island Hospital.

In addition to Coney Island Hospital, two more workshops are planned at the following dates and locations (click the links to register online):

The above is a paid announcement by Coney Island Hospital and the NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

Source: pamhule/Flickr

B LINE

From 9:45am to 3pm, Wednesday to Friday, Brighton Beach-bound B trains run local from Prospect Park to Kings Hwy.

Q LINE

From 9:45am to 3pm, Wednesday to Friday, Manhattan-bound Q trains run express from Kings Hwy to Prospect Park.

F LINE

From 11:45pm to 5am, Monday to Friday, 179 St-bound F trains skip Van Wyck Blvd and Sutphin Blvd.

From 12:01am to 5am, Tuesday to Friday, Coney Island-bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to 21 St-Queensbridge.

From 12:30am to 5am, Tuesday to Friday, 179 St-bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to 71 Av.

A DOT speed-enforcement camera sits at this location, fining people who fail to slow down after exiting the highway. (Source: Google Maps)

DOT speed-enforcement camera sits at this location, fining people who fail to slow down after exiting the highway. (Source: Google Maps)

That’s some fast money.

The speed enforcement camera stationed at the base of a Belt Parkway exit ramp near Ocean Parkway issued approximately 6,000 violations in just one day, earning the city about $300,000 in revenue, according to Councilman Chaim Deutsch.

The camera earned notoriety earlier this month when Sheepshead Bites revealed its location on Shore Parkway between Ocean Parkway and West Avenue, at the very end of a 400-foot-long exit ramp from the Belt Parkway. Locals and Councilman Mark Treyger expressed outrage at the placement, calling it a trap. But the numbers have led Councilman Chaim Deutsch, in whose district the camera is located, to hail it as a success.

“There were 6,000 summonses issued in one day coming off the Belt Parkway. Now it is almost to zero, so the camera is helping,” Deutsch told members of the Manhattan Beach Community Group at a public meeting last week. “But we still want to make sure that people slow down, [that they] have enough time to slow down carefully when they come off the ramp.”

The cameras photograph any vehicles traveling faster than 10mph over the speed limit and send a violation in the mail within 30 days. The fine is $50.

Approximate location of the camera, between the exit and entrance ramps. (Source: Google Maps)

Approximate location of the camera, between the exit and entrance ramps. (Source: Google Maps)

Deutsch brushed off concerns that the camera could be a speed trap, saying that the steep reduction in the weeks it has been there shows that drivers are changing their behavior. To make sure it’s not all about revenue, he’s urging the Department of Transportation to add signage on the Belt Parkway just before the ramp indicating that there is a speed camera in the vicinity.

“I support that if anyone is speeding, enormous amount of speeds, they deserve a summons,” Deutsch told Sheepshead Bites. “But I dont want it to be a ‘gotcha’ camera, and people need to be aware there’s a camera and they should exit the ramp safely.”

He also said that while locals have learned the location and adjusted accordingly, the next season of visitors to Coney Island, Brighton Beach and Sheepshead Bay would benefit from the early warning while also achieve the goal of safer driving.

“Coming next summer when people come to visit the waterfront communities you’re going to have new people coming in, fresh faces to the area, so at the end of the day you want to slow traffic down when they come off the ramp,” he said. He also doesn’t want drivers slamming on the brakes when they see the camera at the last moment. “They’ll slam on the brakes. So if you have signage several hundred feet before the ramp it gives the driver a chance to slow down and get off safely.”

He said the DOT is studying his proposal.

The DOT did not return several messages requesting confirmation of Deutsch’s numbers, or whether or not they were considering additional signage.

Previously, the DOT told Sheepshead Bites they were not currently planning to relocate the cameras as Councilman Treyger had requested. They added that, at 400 feet long, the Belt Parkway’s exit ramp provided drivers with sufficient space to safely reduce speed.

loehmanns

A special public hearing originally slated for tonight on the proposed expansion of Loehmann’s Seaport Plaza, whose owners seek to add a new floor of office space, has been postponed to allow further scrutiny of the plans. However, the zoning committee of Community Board 15 is still moving forward with a special meeting to consider nine other projects in the community.

The meeting will kick off at 6pm in the faculty dining room (U112) of Kingsborough Community College (2001 Oriental Boulevard).

The plans for Loehmann’s Seaport Plaza (2027 Emmons Avenue), as first reported by Sheepshead Bites, call for an additional 10,000 square feet of commercial offices on an entirely new floor of the building. The owner said he needs the additional revenue it would create to offset losses from Superstorm Sandy.

Already built far outside of zoning allowances, the building’s developer needs to obtain approval from the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals, which asks for a recommendation from the Community Board before deciding for itself.

A hearing was added at the last minute to Community Board 15′s agenda for its final meeting before summer recess. With cooperation from the developer, the Board voted to table the matter so it could gather more public input.

With many boardmembers and local community group leaders on vacation, the Board struggled to coordinate an on-site visit with stakeholders.

“[Councilman Chaim Deutsch] and the Community Board want to have the opportunity to really examine this. Over the summer, it was difficult to get the zoning people together and set up meetings,” explained CB15 Chairperson Theresa Scavo. “We want to get all the community groups together and on-site before any decisions are made … and determine any possible downside.”

The developer agreed to postpone his plans again.

Still, the Board is moving forward with a long list of hearings on other projects tonight to make next week’s regularly scheduled meeting more manageable.

Tonight’s agenda will review the following projects:

  • 1601 Gravesend Neck Road – An application to legalize an existing physical culture establishment. This project, for FG Fitness Gallery, was previously denied by the Board after owners failed to send representation in June 2013. The Board at that time also voted to refuse to consider the matter again in the future.
  • 2442 East 14th Street – An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 2137 East 12th Street - An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 4167 Ocean Avenue - An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 325 Avenue Y – An application for a special permit to allow a school within a M1-1 Zoning District
  • 1937 East 14th Street - An application for a special permit to allow the conversion of a two family dwelling into a single family dwelling.
  • 1981 East 9th Street - An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 1977 Homecrest Avenue - An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement of a single family dwelling.
  • 2268 West 1st Street – An application for a special permit to allow the enlargement and conversion of an existing two family residence to a single family residence.

At least this low-life is making it easy for the cops.

Moments before slugging a 73-year-old man in the face and robbing him of his wallet, a perp gave authorities a clear view of his face when he stared into a surveillance camera that captured both suspect and victim.

The thug was filmed entering the elevator of an apartment building on East 13th Street between Avenue O and Avenue P on Wednesday, September 17, at noon. Both he and the victim got on at the same time. As they arrived on the fourth floor, the suspect punched the septuagenarian in the face, rifled through his pants and made off with his wallet.

The victim suffered a laceration when he fell to the ground. He was taken to a local hospital, and was treated and released.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) and then entering TIP577.